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Honest John's Motoring Agony Column 22-02-2020 Part 2

Published 20 February 2020

In Honest John’s Motoring Agony Column 22-2-2020 Part 2 we tot up French speeding tickets, confirm your rights, check out campervan conversions and keep on going to the very end.

Cost, in France

I can confirm that French speeding tickets are now taking just eleven days to arrive on the doormat from the time of the offence. Concealed cameras on RN roads in the area of Tours/Orleans on the Loire. Drivers beware.

TJ, Romsey

Don’t go there. Richard Madeley tells us it’s a vital revenue earner for French 'Departments' starved of Government funding: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/news/legal-motoring-advice/2019-08/french-police-pursuing-thousands-of-uk-motorists-over-driving-offences/ In the period February to June 2019, the French requested 246,138 UK keeper details. The Dutch requested 96. We have also learned that limits are being reduced in French towns and villages, but the limit signs are not being changed to the lower limits.

LR Range Rover Autobiography F34 66 Reg 

Chequered past

I purchased a 30k mile 2015 Range Rover Vogue from a 4x4 dealer on Sept 3rd, 2018 for £46,000. At the time of viewing I was told verbally by the sales person that the car had a full service history. I had to ask this question at the time of viewing because the dealer website does not advertise this information as part of the sale details for its cars. As the car was to my specification (Black exterior, ebony interior, black alloys, privacy glass and panoramic roof). I placed the order. When I went to pick up the car, I requested the service books to accompany it. I was told by the salesman that LandRover no longer supply service stamp books and that all the service information is held centrally and on line by LandRover. No issues were experienced with car until it came to the first 12-month service under my ownership (a 4yr, 64k service). My service agent informed me that when they updated the LandRover database with the current service they noticed that there were no previous service updates other than the original PDI by the original LandRover dealer at 7 miles. I have contacted the supplying dealer both by e-mail and phone on multiple occasions over the last 6 weeks and, whilst being promised by that the situation would be resolved, nothing has happened and my latest contact attempts are now being ignored. I am based in North Wales and the dealership is in Chelmsford. My issue is that, without this service history, the re-sale value of my vehicle is impacted by approximately 20-30% (depending on which Internet source you read) and I do not believe that the original sale price of the vehicle was anywhere reflective of a car that did not have full and up to date service history. Please can you provide any advice on guidance on what my options are going forward.

AE, via email

If you can prove you were told the car had a full service history this is very serious. You were significantly misled under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 and subsequent case law and statutes including the Consumer Rights Act 2015. The dealer has no excuse. He misled you into believing the car had a centrally recorded service history when it did not. Your options are to demand that the supplying dealer buys the car back as current market value for the model, age, trim and mileage. (Check here: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/used-prices/Land--Rover/Range--Rover/2015/ ; fill in the reg and the mileage.) Or he pays you the difference in value between the car with a full service history and one without. See: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/faq/consumer-rights/ If you want me to recommend a good lawyer, I can, but I need to remind you that his fees are £300 an hour + VAT.

Toyota Alphard 2013 F34 

Alphard beater

We are looking for a camper van and very much like conversions done on Toyota Alphards which have been imported from Japan. The prices are very reasonable (particularly compared to similarly sized VWs) but are there any down-sides to buying a model that is a) not well known in this country, and b) imported independently from Japan?

JW, via email

We have covered three generations of Alphard here: first two here: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/toyota/alphard-2002/ newest here: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/toyota/alphard-2015/ Your best source is probably Algys Autos, near Bristol: https://www.algysautos.com/stock / A big advantage is being able to get a hybrid. Another is because it’s originally built as a car there are no van speed restrictions, A disadvantage is not knowing the state of the fairly expensive hybrid battery. Another is its looks.

VW Golf VII Blue Side Moving

Secrets Seven 

I am looking at a 2013 Volkswagen Golf 1.4TSI 6-speed with 26,100 miles. It’s had 2 owners; the first Motability. It has a turbo, which puts me off a bit. Do you know of any complications with this model of car? What type of year-round winter tyres would you put on it? 

CS, Cellardyke

I don't wish to scare you. The Golf VII is an extremely popular car selling, I think, upwards of 70,000 a year in the UK, and owners expect too much, but I get a lot of complaints: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/volkswagen/golf-vii-2013/good/ I would go for Continental AllSeason Contact or Michelin Cross Climate tyres.

Suzuki Vitara 2019 R34 Descending Hill

A bit of rough

I have a 40,000 mile 2015 Skoda Yeti Black 4x4 2litre automatic. I’m
I’m thinking of changing the car and am looking for a replacement. I need to go up and down a rough farm track a couple of times a week that is why I have a 4x4. I have up to £20,000 in cash plus trade in. Could you give me your suggestions for a replacement vehicle.

BW, via email

A Suzuki Vitara 1.4T Boosterjet Allgrip is a good choice: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/road-tests/suzuki/suzuki-vitara-10t-allgrip-2019-road-test/ and https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/road-tests/suzuki/suzuki-vitara-s-boosterjet-2015-road-test/ There is now a new Dacia Duster 1,342cc with 4WD from £18,900 new and I had good experience of one of its predecessors: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/road-tests/dacia/dacia-duster-laureate-tce-125-2016-road-test/ Or stick with Skoda and go for a Karoq 4WD (car tested isn't 4WD): https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/road-tests/skoda/skoda-karoq-suv-15-tsi-petrol-2017-road-test/ Or the very similar SEAT Ateca: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/road-tests/seat/seat-ateca-20-tdi-4drive-2016-road-test/

Skoda DQ200 DSG Production At Vrchlai

Fraughtomatics?

You warn against cars with dry clutch DSG autoboxes, but how would I know if a car had the wet clutch type? Is there a date by when the dry clutch version on Fords & VAG cars had been superseded? Are PSA cars with EAT6 or EAT8 OK?

JB, via email

DQ200 7-speed dry clutch DSGs are fitted to VAG cars with engines up to 1.8 litres, though now they are starting to substitute DQ381 7-speed wet clutch DSGs in 1.5TSIs with larger bodies, such as the VW Tiguan, Skoda Kodiaq, Audi Q3, etc. Ford started to abandon its wet clutch 6-speed Powershift in Mondeos, S-Max and Galaxys from the 2015 facelift, but the 1.5TDCIs and 2.0TDCIs retained it until 2018. Petrols switched to 6-speed torque converter in 2015, then all went to 8-speed torque converter in late 2018. Fiestas switched from 6-speed dry clutch Powershift to 6-speed torque converter in the new model in 2017. Focus switched to 8-speed torque converter in the new model in 2018. PSA's EAT6 and EAT8 torque converter boxes are excellent. So is the 9-speed torque converter auto in the new Astra 1.5 diesel. Suzuki 6-speed torque converter in the Swift, Baleno and Vitara are also good. Mazda 6-speed torque converter autos have been fault-free.

KIA Sorento 2015 Side Mountains

Unconditional Sorento

I am considering buying an EU6 KIA Sorento diesel and want advice regarding age and mileage. I need a car with an automatic gearbox, 7 seats, high driving position and like decent acceleration. I live in rural Yorkshire, only travel 20 miles each way to work on B-roads, but average 15,000 miles per year. I usually buy nearly new cars outright and keep them to about 100,000 miles, so the Kia warranty is very attractive. My dilemma is; Am I better buying a nearly new Sorento (6 to 12 months old) run it for the remainder of the warranty and have greater confidence the DPF has not been/should not be clogged prematurely, or an older Sorento (about 3 years old) where the depreciation hit has been taken by someone else but taking a greater risk on the type of journeys and condition of the DPF before I get it? To help with my decision, what sort of annual mileage should I be looking for on a used Euro6 diesel Sorento of any age to minimise DPF worries? Or should I forget diesel altogether and buy a nearly new Skoda Kodiaq 2.0 petrol? 

SL, via email

They switched the automatic transmission in the Sorento from 6-speed to 8-speed in 2018 and the 8-speed is vastly better, eliminating the slurring of the torque converter between gears because there is now always a suitable ratio. Test of the 2015 here: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/road-tests/kia/kia-sorento-2015-road-test/ Test of the 2018 here: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/road-tests/kia/kia-sorento-22-crdi-gt-line-s-2018-road-test/ If you must have an auto and can afford it, definitely go for the 8-speed. I'm not a big fan of Kodiaqs, at least, not of any I've driven, all of which were on stupid low profile tyres. Others on the team like them, but they leave me cold. And just a 3 year warranty.

Peugeot 208 5dr Horizon

Rights and wrongs 

I purchased a 38,000-mile 2015 Peugeot 208 Style two weeks ago and within a few days we had identified two faults with the car. The driver’s window goes up and down in stages, rather than one continuous action. Apparently, this is a setting you can choose, but we have been unable to re-set it using the instructions. A warning message came on after a few days saying: "engine fault: have the vehicle repaired". This has now been diagnosed by a local garage who have said that the catalytic converter needs to be replaced. We have a 30-day warranty on the car but they have said they will not cover the catalytic converter and we are waiting to hear about the window. The AA-approved dealer we bought the car from has offered to arrange the repairs for us, but we would like your opinion on whether these faults are to be expected on a vehicle of this age and mileage - or whether this should be sounding alarm bells for us?  Because the dealer is AA-approved, we are within our rights to reject the vehicle within the first 30 days after purchase. I look forward to hearing from you and thank you very much in anticipation of your help and guidance.

JC, via email

The dealer who sold you the car is directly liable for both faults (and this does not say much for being AA Approved). The Consumer Rights Act of 2015 gives you the ‘right’ to reject a faulty car after 30 days and case law gives you rights against the dealer for 6 months from date of purchase. Your rights are here: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/faq/consumer-rights/

Audi A1 Spoertback 2019 F34

Hesitant to write

I recently exchanged my 2015 Audi A1 for a 2019 model, having been very pleased with the first one. However, after reading your column about a hesitation problem in a VW that was rectified by a software tweak I wondered if my A1 was suffering something similar. I live at the bottom of a steep lane that joins the main road on a bend, so often have to completely stop and do a hill start. My A1 has let me down carrying out this manoeuvre on numerous occasions. At first I thought the fault was down to my poor clutch control, but I have driven an A1 for the last 4 years without difficulty so I am beginning to  doubt this. I have tried significantly raising the revs whilst bringing my foot off the clutch but as I get into the middle of the road, the revs die, despite further pressure on the accelerator the car inches along and sometimes the engine cuts out altogether. I am losing any confidence at pulling out at garages and junctions as it keeps on happening, although intermittently. The Audi salesman who sold me the car says it is because it is new,  and needs to loosen up a bit (it has covered 5,000 miles) so give it more welly. Is it me or are you aware of any faults in this model? An inability to permanently turn off the lane assist function is also driving me mad.  Interested in your thoughts. 

HC, via email

Seems to me that the Audi salesman is being economical with the truth. But which engine is this? Is it the '35' TSI? If it is, that's the one with the problem and for which the software fix should be available, though now we're finding that the fix is not for all ECUs. It helps to run these engines on decent petrol, which means 99RON Shell V-Power, not low grade 95RON cheap petrol. Another reason for hesitation emerging at junctions is the fact that VAG connects the brake light switch to the ECU and the car will not give decent power at low revs if the ECU thinks the brakes are on.

VW Up Take Up White Side

Connective issue 

I noticed you printed a cambelt query and I wondered if you could advise me. I have a five-year old VW UP that has done 7,500 miles, has been serviced regularly, with a major one three weeks ago. After the service I was contacted by the garage to say as my car was 5 years old it was flagged up as being due for a cambelt replacement, no mention of the very low mileage.  I was very surprised at this as I assumed that I needed to have driven many more miles than this before I needed this done. The caller mentioned the special offer of £150 off the full price before the 31-12-19. I felt he was pushing me towards the offer, which at the moment I would find hard to afford. I would be grateful for any advice that you could give me regarding this matter.

LW, via email

VW has been routinely advising owners that the timing belt of its 1.0TSI engines needs replacing at 5 years old. Readers have reported mileage of 65,000 with no trouble, and Ford gives a much longer life for its belt in oil 1.0 EcoBoost. but I would be inclined to have the belt changed. Hopefully £150 off brings the price down to around £350, which isn't much compared to the cost of a new engine.

Honda Jazz 2020 2 Side

Current thinking

I have a Honda Jazz coming up to 4 years old with 25,000 miles. It’s mainly used for going to the Golf Club (a 10 mile round trip) and  around town, with the odd 150 mile journey now and again. We have a Mazda CX-5 for the long trips. I think it would be good to be environmentally friendly, so thought I might go electric. But don't know where to start looking. I like the Jazz because the golf clubs can stand in the rear footwell as the seat swab folds up. Where would you recommend I start?

CM, via email

There will be a new Jazz hybrid this Spring and they have kept the ‘magic’ seats. Fully electric, the choice  is rapidly increasing. New Honda e, Peugeot e-208, new e-Corsa, new SEAT Mii electric, new VW Up electric, Renault Zoe, Renault Captur mild hybrid, FIAT 500 mild hybrid, Various Suzuki mild hybrids. VW Golf e. The list goes on

Nissan Qashqai 2014 T Side Long 

Incurable 

My father purchased a 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.2 DIG-T Acenta, X-Tronic CVT from a Nissan dealer in late January 2018. It has now done 30,000 miles. After a few months it was losing power and making increasingly suspicious noises at low speed. The dealer said it needed a new engine, which was fitted promptly, efficiently and without charge - so no complaint there, although such a serious failure was disappointing. However, since the new engine was fitted about 4 weeks ago at 29,000 miles, there has been a potentially serious and dangerous, but intermittent, fault. On 6 occasions the car has juddered severely at about 10mph and refused to accelerate. The juddering ceases when the engine is turned off for at least 30 seconds before re-starting. On re-starting the car the behaves perfectly normally. The fault usually occurs about 1 mile or so after a cold start. In town traffic this could be a dangerous fault, for example when accelerating at a junction or roundabout. Unfortunately the fault is intermittent. After the first time it appeared, the car was left with the Nissan dealer but they could not get the fault to occur again. Although willing to deal with the fault, the dealer is refusing further involvement because they cannot recreate the fault for diagnostic purposes. I notice from the review on your website that this model, engine and gearbox, does not have a particularly good track record, which is worrying. In every other respect it is a pleasant and comfortable car. I would be grateful for your advice and comments. Can you offer any suggestions re the nature of the gearbox fault? What is the correct approach to take with the dealer given the problems of diagnosing an intermittent fault? Would it be sensible (even if costly) to trade in this car before its 1 year warranty expires at the end of January? I look forward to hearing from you.

JE, via email

Two different but significant problems. They replaced the engine. But now you're having trouble either with the CVT or with the engine and, though it's worth asking, Nissan probably won't replace the CVT FoC.  I would put a complaint in to the dealer describing the problem. Send it by Royal Mail Special Delivery, keep a copy and the certificate of posting, use the reference code to check it was delivered and print out the certificate of delivery, then staple them all together in case you need them in the future to prove you attempted to reasonably resolve the matter without going to law. In the meantime, switch to 99RON Super, such as Shell V-Power, and if the problem is engine rather than X-tronic related, that might cure it. If you can't cure it, p/x the car.

Click back to Honest John’s Motoring Agonies 22-2-2020 Part 1

Comments

GingerTom    on 22 February 2020

Re online service history: When I bought my used Mazda (who also store it all online) my non-Mazda dealer logged in and printed off the service history for me. I then bought a generic service book off Ebay for subsequent services. When I come to sell and I can present all this info as evidence of service history. My advice is don't buy the car unless the dealer is willing to print off the service history first.

Scot5    on 22 February 2020

Contradiction in advice between Little Better and Connective Issue.

HJ - I asked this before but perhaps I missed your reply. You've stated not so long ago that cambelt changes on VW engines are now 40K miles ( you may also have said or every 4yrs whichever comes first ). This is something I wasn't aware of.

In your answer to Little Better in part 1, you said 1.0TSI requires a change every 40K. In answer to Connective Issue above, you say the 1.0TSI is every 5yr.

I'm confused.

Is it not the case the 4yr interval applies only to pre-2009 cars? The VW UP wasn't introduced until 2011.

Honestjohn    on 23 February 2020

Lot of confusion among VW dealers and specialists here and I've probably reflected that. The short timing belt change intervals are for the 3 cylinder belt in oil 1.0MPI and 1.0TSI. VW dealers are advising 4 or 5 years and 40,000 miles. The longer timing belt intervals are for the 1.4/1.5TSI of 5 years or 60,000 miles.

HJ

Scot5    on 27 February 2020

Confusion throughout VW Group always an issue, especially when it comes to servicing. Appreciate taking the time to reply, thanks.

stojom    on 22 February 2020

Quite right, surely all dealers have printers. As mr. Gorbachev said, trust, but verify!

hissingsid    on 22 February 2020

At every annual service by the supplying Mazda dealership, I am provided with a full printout without having to ask for it. When the time comes to sell, the car will have a full written service history.

Too many people listen to bad advice to "go paperless". It is just a ruse by the supplier to save money.

Marcus T.    on 24 February 2020

Agree. Every Mazda we have had ( 6,3,5 and a 2) when serviced, has had a full print out of the service done. I have kept these in a folder and given them to the new owner when i have sold them.

jaraab67    on 22 February 2020

French speed limits are clearly shown in all towns and villages. The regulations allow you to exceed limits by 5% (10% if checked by a mobile radar) (5 kph & 10 kph up to 100kph) within which you will not be prosecuted.
Exceed these limits and expect to be prosecuted whatever your nationality.
Simples.

Patrickbzh    on 23 February 2020

French speed limits are clearly shown in all towns and villages. The regulations allow you to exceed limits by 5% (10% if checked by a mobile radar) (5 kph & 10 kph up to 100kph) within which you will not be prosecuted. Exceed these limits and expect to be prosecuted whatever your nationality. Simples.

Speed limits in towns and villages were reduced many years ago from 60 kmh to 50 kmh. Ratherthan replacing all the "60" signs with "50", the pragmatic decision was to change the law so that the sign showing the name of the town or village also signified the start of the 50 limit; the sign with a bar through, meaning leaving the town or village, signifies the end of the 50 limit. Consequently, there is generally no sign showing a 50 limit in a town or village. Ignorance of the law is not considered a valid defence.

Honestjohn    on 23 February 2020

Colleague on The Telegraph Richard Madeley got done for 41kmh in a 40kmh zone in Nice.

HJ

General de Goole    on 2 March 2020

No, he wouldn’t have been done for 41km/h on a 40 road. The French system is to take your measured speed (in this instance 46km/h) then deduct 5km/h as a margin of error. This becomes your official recorded speed, and is the basis on which the fine is calculated. The letter from the French police will show both numbers. The back of the ticket explains, in simple French, how the margin of error (“Marge technique*”) is calculated.

stojom    on 22 February 2020

Toyota do the same with their services plus You can verify all work done by registering with the my TOYOTA website.

glidermania    on 22 February 2020

People, especially women, continue to buy what I call these fashion accessory cars such as Audi A1s, purely on brand association. There are plenty of better competitor cars for the A1 that offer greater reliability, dealer maintenance and do not cost anover inflated amount..

sammy1    on 22 February 2020

I cannot work out what part of the column your reply refers to? As for the A1 there has been nothing wrong with our A1, it is in my opinion a Quality car compared with most on offer and if reflected in the after sales prices. It also has the DSG auto with drive select and the box is a pleasure to use has have other DSGs I have had in golfs including GTI. Dealer servicing is no different from any other. As regards the comments in other parts of the column regarding stamped records I always keep and file the dealer INVOICE which gives a comprehensive record of exactly what has been done including the parts and fluids used.

misar    on 22 February 2020

I think the A1 comment was really about Audi value for money. Out of curiosity I looked at the two most recent A1 road tests on this website. Dan Powell's concluding remarks were:

But as a value proposition, there are much better ways to spend £22,000.

and

But there will be many who feel more than a little short changed by the disappointing cabin quality and high list price.

lordwoody    on 23 February 2020

HJ is anti-VW/Audi and Golfs in particular. He also thinks bullfighting is a great sport, so draw your own conclusions.

David593    on 23 February 2020

Or draw your conclusions from the way the company does business. Obviously you have missed all the issues with VAG? Emissions scandal anyone? Failing engines due to substandard parts?

Honestjohn    on 23 February 2020

Sorry, loodwoody, that is not an accurate comment. It would be fairer to state that I am embarrassed by the number of complaints I receive about VAG products. Part of the reason is the number sold in Britain, of course. The other part is an over expectation of quality from the cars. Check a Golf against a Focus in the carbycar reviews and, though suffering from different problems, they are pretty much neck and neck. Bullfighting is not a "great sport". It is an art. It is and has always been reported in the arts pages of Spanish newspapers.

HJ

daveyjp    on 22 February 2020

Agreed. A quick call to any main dealer and service history and warranty claims can be checked. Never believe what a salesman tells you.

I suspect this was bought from a general dealer and was outside of main dealer network due to the unknown history.

SLO76    on 23 February 2020

The vast bulk of low mileage examples like this are returned to main dealers post lease or PCP or snapped up via ex fleet sales. The only way a smaller non-franchise dealer will have it is if there’s something wrong that excluded it from meeting approved used standards. Often it’s poor paint repairs but missing or ignored service histories are very commonplace.


I know loads of people who run cars on permanent lease or PCP and I’d say as many as half don’t service the things in accordance with the manufacturers guidelines. I used to believe dealers would fine them heavily for missing out servicing but a friend who returned a Ford recently and was initially charged £1,000 for paint damage and never having serviced it had this reduced to £300 after a sob story was given.

Anyone spending £46k on a used Range Rover would be ill advised to buy from anyone other than a main dealer.

Peter Hobbs    on 22 February 2020

With reference to HJ info on Ford powershift transmissions? We have a 2015 Fiesta 1.0 ecoboost, 30000 miles with this transmission, no problems so far. I wonder what percentage of all fiestas sold with the dry clutch powershifts have been recorded with faults. In the USA there appears to be a lot of faulty vehicles, but are the European ones made in Cologne more reliable? I am hoping so, as in every other respect the car is excellent.

Honestjohn    on 23 February 2020

It's always good to hear of the reliable dry clutch Powershifts in Fords, just as it is to hear of reliable DQ200 7-speed dry clutch DSGs/s-tronics in VAG cars. However, the level of complaints about failure of these transmissions remains far higher than for any other automatic transmissions. For example, I have never heard of the failure of a 6-speed torque converter automatic transmission in a Mazda. The complaint level for 6 and 7DCTs in Hyundias and KIAs is very low. As are complaints about Renault's EDC, whether in Renaults, Nissans or Dacias.

HJ

Dag Hammar    on 22 February 2020

Re : chequered past. As soon as I started reading this tale of woe I wondered if the car had come from Chelmsford, sure enough, it had. Now the OP has not said where he bought the car from but if it was Saxton 4 x 4 then he may be aided by the following.

They were successfully taken to court by Trading Standards and fined £27,375 plus costs of £37,375 in Oct/Nov 2019. All of this info is in the public domain and the case was widely reported in Essex newspapers and a Suffolk newspaper.

Edited by Dag Hammar on 22/02/2020 at 16:58

stojom    on 22 February 2020

That’s the trouble buying a car from a dealer miles away especially if it’s non franchised and you can’t even appeal to the manufacturers. Would rather pay a bit more at franchise dealer than a second hand garage for piece of mind, hopefully.
Regarding ford power shifts complaints to hj are all from European owners I believe, still time!

Dorset123    on 23 February 2020

Quite right about buying a car from someone miles away, The best way to buy a car is to buy it from a local dealer who you know is trustworthy. The reason why people search the internet to find the cheapest price is that they can't really afford what they are looking for. A much better way of buying a car is to see what the local dealer has for the money you can afford and buy it from them.

groaver    on 23 February 2020

Quite right about buying a car from someone miles away, The best way to buy a car is to buy it from a local dealer who you know is trustworthy. The reason why people search the internet to find the cheapest price is that they can't really afford what they are looking for. A much better way of buying a car is to see what the local dealer has for the money you can afford and buy it from them.

I'm sorry but that's wrong on many counts.

Still, if you keep buying local, I'll be able to source the most competively priced car of they type I'm looking for and not end up paying over the odds and still have peace of mind.

SLO76    on 23 February 2020

“ have a Honda Jazz coming up to 4 years old with 25,000 miles. It’s mainly used for going to the Golf Club (a 10 mile round trip) and around town, with the odd 150 mile journey now and again. We have a Mazda CX-5 for the long trips. I think it would be good to be environmentally friendly, so thought I might go electric. But don't know where to start looking. I like the Jazz because the golf clubs can stand in the rear footwell as the seat swab folds up. Where would you recommend I start?”

Keep the Jazz. It’s utterly reliable, it fits its brief as a practical second car that covers a low mileage perfectly and will still be delivering reliable service in a decade or more if looked after. Switching to an electric supermini would save less than £500 a year in fuel U to which doesn’t come close to adding up financially.

An electric city car starts at £17k upwards plus the battery packs need replaced at huge cost at 7-8yrs if you want any worthwhile range. This impacts depreciation severely which will more than wipe out the above fuel saving.

For the low mileage use a much more costly hybrid doesn’t add up either. I’m always amazed at the number of Yaris and Jazz hybrids I see for sale with peanut mileages up. Who bought them? They will have cost the first owner substantially more than a much cheaper straightforward petrol model.

Electric cars are much more costly to the environment to built too and generate emissions via the power stations that power it. I’d say that you would better serve the environment by keeping your current car much longer. This save the need for another car being built.

MoDo613    on 24 February 2020

You assume it was either no replacement car or an electric car. But it sounds as if the car will be replaced anyway. Far better to replace it with something that doesn't poison those who live in the vicinity it is driven. Wouldn't worry about the power stations. 50% of our power is already renewable and increasing daily. No fuel car will benefit from this increase in renewable energy. Besides filtration in a static dedicated sealed system is infinitely better than a regularly cold-starting variably efficient engine. Finally please stop peddling the myth about batteries requiring replacement. Find me an engine that has a 100,000 mile, 8 year warranty -that ought to indicate just how reliable and long lasting EV batteries actually are.

stojom    on 23 February 2020

Groaver
If you buy a second hand car which is out of manufacturers warranty from a dealer miles away you will have to deal with them if things go badly wrong and require frequent trips. Who would want that hassle.

groaver    on 23 February 2020

Groaver If you buy a second hand car which is out of manufacturers warranty from a dealer miles away you will have to deal with them if things go badly wrong and require frequent trips. Who would want that hassle.

Mine don't tend to be out of warranty when purchased.

But research goes a long way.

hissingsid    on 25 February 2020

There is always the option of taking out an after market insurance based warranty which enables you to have any necessary repairs carried out by your local trusted garage. I have done this in the past and it worked for me.

galileo    on 27 February 2020

There is always the option of taking out an after market insurance based warranty which enables you to have any necessary repairs carried out by your local trusted garage. I have done this in the past and it worked for me.

May work as long as you have carefully read the small print about exclusions before buying and nothing goes wrong that is on the list of exclusions.

There have been several stories of disappointment and distress when the "warranty" won't cover the problem.

stojom    on 1 March 2020

Sad to say honestjohn.co.uk in administration really hope it can be saved. It’s a public service

stojom    on 1 March 2020

Sad to say honestjohn.co.uk in administration really hope it can be saved. It’s a public service

Apparently it has been bought by Heycar an online car selling company who say it will continue as an independent voice. Hope that’s true seeing who their backers are ( a well known German car company)

Edited by stojom on 01/03/2020 at 11:17

Engineer Andy    on 1 March 2020

Yes, we know and was discussed a while ago on the following Backroom thread:

www.honestjohn.co.uk/forum/post/133996/n-a---futur...f

stojom    on 1 March 2020

removed by poster.

Edited by stojom on 01/03/2020 at 12:47

stojom    on 1 March 2020

Yes I put it here as many might not read the back room. I normally don’t.

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