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Honest John’s Motoring Agony Column 06-07-2019 Part 2

Published 05 July 2019

Click back to Honest John’s Motoring Agonies 06-07-2019 Part 1

Batteries included 

I am considering changing my car for a Ford Mondeo hybrid. I read recently that it is only suitable for drivers who do a high mileage, as that is necessary to charge the battery. I would appreciate your view on this matter as I only do about 7,000 miles a year. 

PC, via email

That is a trap that self-charging hybrid drivers can fall into. The 12v combustion engine battery needs charging in the same way as a conventional car or you can get to the point where you can't start the car. The more the hybrid battery loses charge, the less assistance it gives and the miles per gallon drop, but is still keeps running as a conventional car. Test of Mondeo hybrid here: /road-tests/ford/ford-mondeo-vignale-2015-road-test/

Toyota Camry 2019 F34jpg

Sitting comfortably

Some twelve years ago you gave us good advice when our local BMW dealer tried to stitch us up. We went to Lexus and enjoyed our LS430 for ten years without any problems but felt it was getting a bit tired. So we bought a new Auris hybrid in September 2017, but have only done 5,000 miles as it really doesn’t suit us. We currently have a Yaris auto as a shopping trolley, an immaculate 1999 Mercedes SL for fun, and the Auris. Having had the use of 47 cars in the past 57 years (you name it, we’ve driven it) we find the Auris lacks the luxury feel or driving style that we have had with Mercedes, BMW or Lexus. We want a quiet, comfortable car for longer journeys and space for grandchildren when necessary; petrol engine, automatic, with power to get out of trouble in a price range maximum £25,000 including Auris trade in. Any ideas, please?

KC, via email

You will lose a fortune on the Auris hybrid because it has just been superseded by the much better TNGA based Corolla hybrid. If you want a good ride quality and status, go for a Mercedes C-Class with 'Airmatic' suspension. This gives a softer ride on 18-inch wheels with low profile tyres than it does on 16-inch wheels with deep profile tyres: /road-tests/mercedes-benz/mercedes-benz-c200-cdi-16-2014-road-test/ Alternatively, maybe the fine riding and handling new TNGA based Toyota Camry hybrid, that should help with the trade in price for the Auris: /carbycar/toyota/camry-2019/

Dai Sirion 05 F34 700

Extra assistance required

My garage thinks that the problem with the steering of my Daihatsu Sirion will be solved by a new steering rack that they have ordered from Japan that will take 3 weeks to arrive. They have warned us it is a ‘big job’. We have already paid £900 for the electronic control unit which we think was unnecessary. They have had the car since 1st March. It is difficult to know how to proceed and any thoughts you have would be appreciated.

JR, via email

PAS failure on a Sirion is unfamiliar to us. However, the Sirion continued in production as the Perodua MYVI: /carbycar/perodua/myvi-2006/ so the steering components for this are almost bound to be the same and it could be that your garage doesn't know this. A further suggestion is to key <power steering repairs> into Google, then contact the various specialists that come up who may have an answer. I keyed <Perodua MYVI Power Steering Parts> into Google and got a lot of results. Same Googling <Daihatsu Sirion Power Steering Parts>

KIA Touch Screen

Touchy subject 

For some time you have regularly recommended KIA vehicles due to the 7-year warranty. In March 2015 I purchased a KIA Venga, partly influenced by the warranty, but in October last year (at 43 months old) the touch-screen for SatNav, radio and reversing camera appeared to lose its sensitivity to the extent I could not enter addresses, post codes or change between FM and AM and barely see the radio display. I was informed at the dealer that this part only carried a 36-month warranty. In the last week or two it was suggested to me that I may have some redress, but both KIA and the dealer deny this. Even though it appears that it is only the screen at fault, as I can often input information when the car is warm and all works well, a repair is not possible. A new replacement unit would cost £1,733.45 + VAT (more than 10% of the price of a new vehicle) or £791.78 + VAT for a refurbished unit. Do you think I am being unreasonable expecting at least a hefty discount off a replacement, or should I just purchase a portable SatNav and hope the radio continues working ?.

DJ, Blackpool

KIA offers a 7-year warranty. Of course it does not cover every single component, particularly those that can be damaged by a driver. The details of what it covers and does not cover are very  clearly explained in the service and warranty booklet. Touch screens are a wider problem that worries me generally. There is no way that they are all going to last the 7-year average design life of every car. iPads don't. Samsung tablets don't. So why should touch screens in cars? You may be able to get yours repaired by http://www.cartronicx.co.uk ; by http://www.clusterrepairs.co.uk ; or by http://www.ecutesting.com /

CTEK Battery Conditioning Float Charger 

Battery firming 

My wife's 2016 Land Rover Discovery Sport has had persistent battery issues, needing 4 replacement batteries. After a 3-week holiday when the car was unused the battery was totally flat. The JLR dealer can find nothing wrong. My wife makes journeys of up to 5 miles. We occasionally use her car for a 250-mile round trip. If, however, we cease making that trip, JLR has not quite confirmed that the battery would be progressively discharged. No information is forthcoming on the distance driven to re-charge the battery. Is it reasonable that the Discovery Sport is unsuitable for use as a runaround? What car with higher seating position without battery worries would you recommend, eg: BMW X1, Audi Q3, Volvo XC40?

RM, Wilmslow

Most modern cars with stop/start systems and regenerating alternators are unsuitable for repeated short runs because they rely on coasting and braking to recharge their batteries and this requires longer journeys. The other cars on your list are likely to suffer the same problem. If you want to use the car for short runs, get a battery conditioning float charger (Accumate, CTEK, Ring) that you can hook the battery up to in your garage to keep the battery at 13.5 volts. (See: https://kit.honestjohn.co.uk/reviews/review-ctek-battery-charger-mxs-50/) If it's a diesel, a regime of short runs under 5 miles might lead to trouble with the diesel particulate filter as well as with the battery.

Audi TT DSG T F34 700

Just dropping in

I had the bonnet of my Audi TT resprayed in the summer of 2015, costing £450. Over the last year, the lacquer coat is starting to peel off in places. The paint shop tells me that the lacquer has failed due to bird droppings and that I would need to pay again for it to be fixed, although they did offer to do it at a reduced rate. I’m left wondering if this is right and fair. Your advice would be appreciated here. I don’t recall any warnings that birds may be a problem when the job was done. Also, there are a number of spots affected on the bonnet, but I can’t really remember any occasions in the last few years where I’ve found bird droppings on the car. It’s certainly not a common occurrence where we live. The promised quote to repair has now materialised and, before I go back to them, I’d appreciate a better idea of where I stand. Should I contest whether I should be paying again after only three and a half years? 

SD, via email

The paint is more than 3 years old and even a manufacturer paint warranty is only for 3 years. But £450 is top money for just a bonnet. The problem is not so much acid/alkali in the bird droppings as the area the droppings cover, and the effect of UV rays that cannot penetrate it. Standard advice is to clean any bird droppings off with a wet cloth whenever they hit. But obviously a bit difficult if you're on holiday and a flight of geese pass overhead the first day. Obviously never ever park under trees or under the lamp posts at airport carparks. (That's why the last spaces to go are under lamp posts.)

Audi A3 3-dr Fl 06 F34 700 

Dire straits

I'm in dire need of some help. I'm currently just about to finish my time at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and join the British Army. An immensely proud moment in my life. However, this event has become overshadowed by car problems. Last month I bought a 2006 Audi A3 with 97,000 miles on the clock for £2,600. The clutch and flywheel had just been replaced and it came with a 24-month warranty. However, 32 days later the car started making noises so I drove it to the local garage. They tell me that the gear box needs replacing and would cost £1,500 for parts and labour. Furthermore if the gearbox oil has contaminated the clutch, then I would need to replace that too for a further £1,700. The warranty company is refusing to pay out unless it is deemed a mechanical fault. The garage I bought the car from will not repair, replace or refund my money, claiming I must prove that the car had these faults at the time of purchase. I now find myself close to £3,000 out of pocket and feeling as though I have been robbed on any sense of decency and justice. Please could you give me any help or advise me? 

TR, via email

The garage you bought the car from is lying and trying to hoodwink you. You have a clear case on the facts that the car was "not of satisfactory quality" on the date of purchase. See: /faq/consumer-rights/ If the dealer does not respond to a letter sent by Post Office Special Delivery rejecting the car and listing the faults with it that are your reasons for rejection then take the matter to Small Claims. Keep a copy of the letter and staple the copy to the certificate of posting so it becomes a matter of record for the court. Unfortunately, even if you obtain a High Court Sheriff's enforcement order, the type of dealer that sells a 2006 Audi A3 for £2,600 then refuses to take responsibility for it, may have no assets that the sheriffs can seize. Small Claims here: https://www.gov.uk/make-court-claim-for-money and 'Which' advice here: https://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/advice/how-to-use-the-small-claims-court  Unless you can prove the car was clocked you could even lose your case because £2,600 was cheap for a 2006 Audi A3 with 97k miles.

Mercedes -Benz C-Class 18-inch Wheel

Soft option

I must very soon replace the tyres on my Mercedes-Benz 220CDI Estate 2011. It is presently on 225/40R Front and 255/35R Rear. I would like tyres giving a softer ride since I will soon be 83. Your expert advice would be most welcome. 

HG, via email

You don't say C-Class or E-Class. If it had 'Airmatic' suspension you'd be a lot more comfortable. As it is, you need to go down a few wheel sizes from 19-inch (which you should never have bought in the first place) in order to fit more 'comfortable', deeper profile tyres. These are W205 C-Class wheel and tyre sizes:

16-inch with 225/55 R16 tyres

17-inch with 225/50 R17 tyres front and rear

17-inch with 225/50 R17 front; 245/45 R17 rear

18-inch with 225/45 R18 front and rear

18-inch with 225/45 R18 front; 245/40 R19 rear

19-inch with 225/40 R19 front; 255/35 R19 rear

19-inch with 225/40 R19 front; 245/35 R19 rear

 

Feetle decision

I have a VW Polo TDI manual and need an automatic due to left foot problems. Could you recommend a petrol automatic, perhaps smaller? I'm in a hilly rural areas, am 77 years old and have a budget of up to £7,500.

VA, via email

KIA Picanto 1.2 4-speed torque converter auto or Hyundai i10 1.2 4-speed torque converter auto. But though your left foot won't have to press the clutch any more it's best to learn to left foot brake. Then you can stop the car in a much shorter time than it takes to move your right foot from accelerator to brake. Particularly important in pedestrian areas and in multi-story carparks.

Jaguar F Pace Side Ascending Steep

Buy or rent?

You have assisted me over buying a new Jaguar F-Pace to tow abroad with in my latter years. I have bought  'outright'  previously and said "no" to PCP, although the dealerships push it hard. I am buying the V6 diesel to tow and the PCP numbers for 4 years are attractive, but I worry about such a contract and the fact that it's not my car even though I treat all my cars with great care. Is there some logic to follow in deciding which option is best for oneself for given circumstances? Whether outright purchase or PCP, what is your view on ‘gap insurance’, again something that I have always refused to take.

MN, via email

Do the sums. Compare the total of deposit, 48 monthly payments and final payment with the cost of simply buying the car. Yes, with a PCP you do need GAP insurance in case you have a crash, in which case the value of the repaired car will be less than it would otherwise have been. GAP is cheaper bought independently. We work with and recommend ALA. MotorEasy does GAP too.

Renault Megane Sport Tourer R34 Speed

Rogue Renault?

We have a 2017 Renault Megane GT 1.6dCi Sports Tourer. It has all the bells and whistles and option packs and we bought it as an ex-management car from Renault Cannock at 9 months old, with 5,000 miles. It now has 25,000 miles on it and has the 4-year warranty until May 2021. My wife uses it for an 80-mile a day round trip cross country 3 days a week and many trips across the country for work (hence the 20k a year annual mileage) and absolutely loves it. All was fine until January this year, when my wife was caught in heavy traffic. It felt like the clutch was shortening into the footwell. The gear change become shorter and stiffer, the clutch becomes shorter again and it was impossible to change gear. The car then stalled. At this point, all the systems failed, then car shut itself down, applied the electromechanical handbrake and went dead. The first time this happened I wasn't far away and joined my wife. The car spent over a week at Renault Whitchurch (which was where Renault recovery told us to go) and it returned fine. An electronic box next to the battery had blown and had to be replaced. On Thursday this week, the same thing happened again, this time going through the Dartford tunnel and my wife made it to a safe place on the A13 as the car shut down. This time, there was also lots of clutch smell. The recovery man tried to put a new fuse into the electronic box by the battery and it blew a 50 - 70amp fuse. The car was recovered to Renault Romford where it now sits. Renault assist couldn't provide a car for 24 hours, so my wife stayed with family in north London overnight, got the train home and then got a courtesy car from Stafford train station to get home. We are told Renault Cannock has been informed about this and I intend to make contact with them, as the selling dealer. Renault customer service has been truly dreadful. Everyone sounds sympathetic but actually getting something done is an entirely different matter. We bought the Megane because of the 5-star NCAP rating and the safety systems it offers (our other car is a Volvo XC60), balanced with the decent diesel engine you have recommended and a good kit list. We have 2 young children, drive high mileage on each car and therefore the safety and reliability of our vehicles is really important to us. What should we expect Renault to do? Obviously, they will fix the current problem, but what about the damage that will have been caused to the clutch and the gearbox from these 2 instances? Secondly, we don't have confidence in the car any more. I accept cars go wrong, but a vehicle that twice has left my wife in a dangerous situation can't remain with us. Should I expect Renault to buy it back after 13 months or just trade it in? And thirdly, on a budget of about £16k, what should we change it for?  It doesn't have to be an estate, but something of similar size and suitable for the mileage that also scores highly for safety and has good customer service: Volvo V60 or V40 or Honda Civic or KIA Optima are considerations but I appreciate your thoughts or any other suggestions. 

MD, via email

First report of any faults at all with this model Megane, now logged in carbycar. Basically liability rests with the dealer who sold you the car. Renault is only responsible for meeting its warranty obligations. You may be able to negotiate with the supplying dealer. Law here: /faq/consumer-rights/  If you can do a buyback deal with the dealer that doesn't involve having to have another Renault, a Honda Civic 1.6iDTEC is  very economical, but a KIA cee'd (or later Ceed) comes with balance of 7-year warranty.

Click back to Honest John’s Motoring Agonies 06-07-2019 Part 1

Comments

Slow Eddie    on 5 July 2019

A 77-year-old writes: "I have a VW Polo TDI manual and need an automatic due to left foot problems." And the inevitable advice: switch to left-foot braking. Aaaargh.

glidermania    on 5 July 2019

A 77-year-old writes: "I have a VW Polo TDI manual and need an automatic due to left foot problems." And the inevitable advice: switch to left-foot braking. Aaaargh.

That's because it is the best advice! Do you park or reverse your manual car with just your right foot on the accelerater or do you use clutch control using your left foot? Ergo.....

groaver    on 5 July 2019

I use my left foot to dip the clutch to prevent stalling and brake with my right foot. Voila.

Edited by groaver on 05/07/2019 at 21:34

non-stop    on 6 July 2019

A 77-year-old writes: "I have a VW Polo TDI manual and need an automatic due to left foot problems." And the inevitable advice: switch to left-foot braking. Aaaargh.

That's because it is the best advice! Do you park or reverse your manual car with just your right foot on the accelerater or do you use clutch control using your left foot? Ergo.....

The discussion on left for braking is obviously going to run for years, but there must be exceptions to prove the rule. That might include the case of someone who has problems with their left foot....

jchinuk    on 7 July 2019

Is "left foot braking" automatically (excuse the pun) an issue with electric cars?

HandCart    on 10 July 2019

I don't understand this.

Yes, with a manual.

With a TC automatic, I would just brake (probably using my right foot) and use creep (no throttle applied).

Honestjohn    on 6 July 2019

As long as attitudes like Slow Eddie's persists, old people attempting to right foot brake automatics will continue to run over and kill people. That is unless their car has very effective front and rear City Braking to stop the car for them.

HJ

Slow Eddie    on 6 July 2019

why doesn't the same pedal confusion apply to drivers of manual transmissions, HJ? Just continually asserting something doesn't make it so. It's a complex issue, and you seem unable to acknowledge this. Old people, eh.

Silas Marner    on 6 July 2019

why doesn't the same pedal confusion apply to drivers of manual transmissions, HJ? Just continually asserting something doesn't make it so. It's a complex issue, and you seem unable to acknowledge this. Old people, eh.

Perhaps pedal confusion does occur with manuals, but in such a case the car will stall and come to a halt. My old father did exactly this with his auto and ended up embedded in the garage wall, luckily.

groaver    on 6 July 2019

. My old father did exactly this with his auto and ended up embedded in the garage wall, luckily.

Oh, that's a bit harsh! I hope he was okay.

Doris & Boris    on 6 July 2019

My father in law inadvertently depressed the accelerator in his automatic when surprised by a vehicle cutting across the T Junction he was approaching. He launched his car across the junction, up a kerb and into a front garden, missing pedestrians and traffic, and shunted the car on the driveway into the house. He admitted to his rescuers that he had pressed the wrong pedal. Everyone was kind and helpful, but that would not have been the case if had struck and injured (or worse) someone. This was his driving finale, having had a few scrapes and minor shunts in the preceding months. We returned his driving licence to the DVLA. If he had had better control of his car, this may not have happened. In light of this, and subsequent experience with other elderly relatives, there is a case for retesting and not just the self certification of health that is currently required to maintain an individuals licence.

HandCart    on 10 July 2019

Eh? -if you inadvertently press the accelerator on a manual car when intending to press the brake pedal it will stall and come to a halt? Er, will it not accelerate??

Mr Dave    on 6 July 2019

As long as attitudes like Slow Eddie's persists, old people attempting to right foot brake automatics will continue to run over and kill people. That is unless their car has very effective front and rear City Braking to stop the car for them. HJ

Please provide statistical evidence to support this claim or withdraw the comment.

DrTeeth    on 6 July 2019

Unless HJ is giving advice about which car to buy next, his other advice is quite poor. The more he tal;ks about mechanical matters, the more he shows how limited his knowledge is. He really does sound like a broken record, "left-foot braking", "use superfuels", "Mitchelin Cross Climates" etc etc.

CMclean    on 6 July 2019

I’d hate to see the carnage I would potentially cause by trying to left foot brake after near on 50 years of driving almost every type of gearbox under the sun.

IrishNeil    on 6 July 2019

"Left foot braking is an advanced technique, and should only be attempted after lots of practice. When learning to left foot brake, you’ll initially press the pedal far too hard as you’ll be used to the action of pressing a clutch all the way to the floor. It takes time to re-programme the ‘muscle memory’ of your foot and leg, and a bit of empty tarmac is highly recommended."

"Some people find new ideas difficult to accept, the more probable reason is the fear of leaving their comfort zone and treading a new uncertain path. Human being seeks stability and comfort. New ideas are first accepted as unstable. In order to gain from something, we have to forego another which causes discomfort."

While I understand the agitation HJ's advice has on some, not all readers, perhaps walk on by and get on with your lives instead of allowing new safety information infringing on your busy schedules! Just saying!

Keep up the good work HJ, I'm sure someone somwhere will be safer due to your advice.

Edited by IrishNeil on 06/07/2019 at 15:23

groaver    on 6 July 2019

IrishNeil: away you go, you big sook (brown- noser).

Advance techniques, new ideas, etc. Honestly!

IrishNeil    on 6 July 2019

IrishNeil: away you go, you big sook (brown- noser).

Advance techniques, new ideas, etc. Honestly!

well done Groaver,

without prompting, proving by that reply that you find it dififcult to hold a debate like an adult!

Not agreeing with another person does not make them wrong.

Resorting to name calling is a reflection on your social skills.

I meet your type every day at work at our busy NHS emergency department...next!!!

;)

groaver    on 6 July 2019

I'm sorry

You are one of our unsung heroes.

I'll never tease you again and simply agree with you. ;)

IrishNeil    on 7 July 2019

I'm sorry

You are one of our unsung heroes.

I'll never tease you again and simply agree with you. ;)

Aww thanks Groaver, how sweet of you but....

somehow your previous form indicates you simply enjoy pressing buttons and would likely start an argument in an empty room.

You're such a wonderful warrior, the keyboard variety - MWAH ;0

groaver    on 7 July 2019

Your passive aggressive stance is endearing too. :-"

IrishNeil    on 7 July 2019

Your passive aggressive stance is endearing too. :-"

thanks again Groaver, it's how I survive a shift dealing with your type, take care and be good! This thread has wound its way to infinity and beyond!

groaver    on 7 July 2019

Edited by groaver on 07/07/2019 at 19:31

CarolinaStates    on 7 July 2019

Your passive aggressive stance is endearing too. :-"

wind your neck in Groaver, it must be difficult when you get called out for being an argumentative douche.

1 - 0 to the IrishNeil

groaver    on 7 July 2019

You're too kind.

Thanks for all the wise words.

sherwenator    on 7 July 2019

sound advice my father just got a fresh automatic,,,a driver all his life,,,,would be hard to change him to left foot braking,,,,dont think its for everyone,,,but agree with above statement

CarolinaStates    on 7 July 2019

sound advice my father just got a fresh automatic,,,a driver all his life,,,,would be hard to change him to left foot braking,,,,dont think its for everyone,,,but agree with above statement

over here, its a natural way to learn, stick shift is not as popular as over in UK

Edited by CarolinaStates on 07/07/2019 at 18:03

BrendanP    on 6 July 2019

Touchy subject.

Touch screen displays are not intrinsically unreliable, they are used widely on industrial machines and process equipment, but as with anything else in life, you get what you pay for. Cheap screens used on mobile phones will not be as reliable, and will be subjected to more knocks and bangs that a screen fitted into a car. If Kia won't cover it for a full 7 years they they should start looking for a better quality screen. They must have all the statistics on in-service failures. In the interests of good public relations it would be better to replace the few screens that fail under warranty, than to appear to quibble about an otherwise industry-leading warranty

masiv    on 6 July 2019

If I had my left leg amputated and needed an automatic, would HJ still tell me I should learn to left foot brake?

will86    on 7 July 2019

There are a few key issues with left foot braking. First, cars aren't designed for it - it's far more comfortable to operate the accelerator and brake with your right foot and therefore you have more control. Second, we are not taught to drive with left foot braking. Trying to relearn something is possible, but in a panic situation could easily lead to confusion. Frankly, if you can't work out which pedal you should be using, you shouldn't be driving and really that's the crux of the matter. People should be more realistic about their abilities but alas they aren't.

galileo    on 7 July 2019

There are a few key issues with left foot braking. First, cars aren't designed for it - it's far more comfortable to operate the accelerator and brake with your right foot and therefore you have more control.



All the automatics I have driven have a wider brake pedal than the manual ones (especially hire cars in the USA, which are invariably autos).

It therefore seems that cars are designed for left foot braking.

will86    on 7 July 2019

Well yes and no. Yes autos have bigger brake pedals but they are still offset to the right and are designed to be used with the right foot.

Jamesetyefirst    on 7 July 2019

If you don't want to / are incapable of left foot braking, for example amputation, then obviously don't do so. HJ is simply offering advice , if you don't agree with it , then ignore it as you are perfectly entitled to do so, I follow his advice on left foot braking , but not "superfuels ", because there was an examination of fuel types on Fifth Gear and they concluded it made no difference at all. What does make a difference is quality oil and quality antifreeze.

Edited by Jamesetyefirst on 07/07/2019 at 13:19

masiv    on 7 July 2019

If you don't want to / are incapable of left foot braking, for example amputation, then obviously don't do so. HJ is simply offering advice , if you don't agree with it , then ignore it as you are perfectly entitled to do so, I follow his advice on left foot braking , but not "superfuels ", because there was an examination of fuel types on Fifth Gear and they concluded it made no difference at all. What does make a difference is quality oil and quality antifreeze.

" need an automatic due to left foot problems." And the inevitable advice: switch to left-foot braking. Aaaargh."

Why is he giving this advice to this poor reader then? Fair enough giving his opinion, but to totally ignore the question is daft and more to the point rude.

jchinuk    on 7 July 2019

Regarding : Dire straits,
With due respect, buying a 13 year old Audi A3 is folly, you don't have to drive very much to realise that most are trashed, in not from new, certainly from the second owner. No surprise the gearbox is ****ed.

Drivetherevolution    on 8 July 2019

HJ please take note the info you've been given regarding the 12v battery on hybrids is incorrect. The 12v battery powers the electronics but NOT the starter. The starter is intrinsic to the gearbox/drive unit and uses a motor/generator to spin the engine via a clutch system. Thus it is powered by the high voltage battery. It is correct that a flat 12v will brick the car, until it is recharged like any other 12v battery on a regular car. Once the 12v has enough power to run the electronics the high voltage contactor can activate the drive unit to start the engine using the high voltage battery. Indeed the solar panels fitted to electric and hybrid cars thus far are very small panels intended to maintain the 12v battery and nothing at all to do with the high voltage battery. Obviously cars with significantly more solar generation capacity are on the horizon which will charge the high voltage battery.

Edited by Mark Wittler on 08/07/2019 at 13:25

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