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Top 20: Cars hit hardest by the 2017 VED changes

The announcement that Vehicle Excise Duty (VED) is to change fundamentally from April 1st 2017 was one of the genuine shocks of the 2015 budget. The good news is that it doesn’t affect your existing car, but if you’re planning on ever buying a new car after 2017, the bad news is that you could face a substantial additional car tax payment.

If you don’t want that to happen, here are 20 cars you should think very carefully about before buying – these are 2017’s biggest VED losers. We’ve looked at the cost over a six-year period because the £310 'premium' supplement for cars over £40,000 applies for the first five years that the standard rate is payable, after the separate first year charge.

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Land Rover Discovery SDV6 SE (£41,600)

CO2: 203g/km

Six-year VED total at 2015 rate: £2090

Six-year VED total at 2017 rate: £3450

Penalty: £1360

The Land Rover Discovery is an extremely good do-it-all 4x4, at once a proper off roader and a luxurious family car. But it’s getting on a little now, and its engines are increasingly looking dirty, which means that even a base model SDV6 will cost a whopping £3450 in tax over six years from 2017. 

Comments

Bill shepherd    on 26 January 2017

Hi I have a 2005 Citroen C3 diesel 1560cc CO (g/km 0.188) can you please tell me what my VED/ road fund licence will be. oldfeller@outlook.com

HJ Editor    on 27 January 2017

Hi Bill. There's no change to existing cars - the new VED rates only apply to cars registered from April 1 2017. So your C3 will stay the same.

John Walkden    on 5 February 2017

Hi Bill,

Your car will stay in the same BAND, as will mine, a 2009 BMW, that is not to say the charges per band may rise in future?

Possibly rises in future in line with RPI, inflation, but no doubt above it and to whatever the Chancellor at the time feels how far it can be raised without it becoming politically harmful.

Edited by John Walkden on 05/02/2017 at 10:48

Starcard    on 12 February 2017

Does this only affect brand new cars? If I buy a used car from April 2017 will that be affected ?

   on 15 February 2017

But surly the Manufacturers can reduce the list price on future modles from £40650 to £39999.

   on 21 February 2017

I am a little confused by the new VED entering in on 1st April 2017 and have two questions.

I have a Rover 75 - 2.0 Diesel current VED £185.00 per annum. Will this change?

However. I am thinking of changing my Rover for a SUV either Nissan X-Trail 2.2 diesel 2006 £275.00 VED or a Kia Sorento 2.0 diesel 2006/7 £295 VED. Will these alter?

Thank s
Peter

HJ Editor    on 21 February 2017

Hi Peter, the new rates only apply to cars registered after April 1 2017.

Existing cars will stay in their current bands - so for now your Rover won't change and neither will the X-Trail or Sorento.

Dave wilson    on 24 February 2017

I have Kia Sedona 2.9 injection how much is my tax going to be

Rich49    on 29 April 2017

I have a 2.5 litre Rover 75 2002 that I had to SORN due to financial difficulties but now want to put back on the road. As it has a rating of 249g CO2 the DVLA website now shows this as £520 when it was below £300 before. Is this a mistake?

   on 23 May 2017

Hi John: Do you think that diesel fuel prices will increase any time soon owing to the latest emissions ratings and will the VED on used diesel cars will increase in future. Thanks: alseasidepal.

Simon Oxley    on 11 June 2017

A point which seems to have been lost in the statement "for older vehicles, there will be no change" is that this legislation means that people with older cars paying historically higher rates of VED are stuck paying that for the duration of the life of the car whilst those with new cars drop back to the new standard rate after 6 years. For example I have a 10 year old Mercedes 500 in which I do around 6000 miles per year for which I have to pay £535 annual VED. Someone who buys a new Ferrari today pays £2000 VED in the first year and then £450 for five years followed by £140 a year. How can this be considered to be even vaguely equitable?

Colin Siddle    on 26 June 2017

A point which seems to have been lost in the statement "for older vehicles, there will be no change" is that this legislation means that people with older cars paying historically higher rates of VED are stuck paying that for the duration of the life of the car whilst those with new cars drop back to the new standard rate after 6 years. For example I have a 10 year old Mercedes 500 in which I do around 6000 miles per year for which I have to pay £535 annual VED. Someone who buys a new Ferrari today pays £2000 VED in the first year and then £450 for five years followed by £140 a year. How can this be considered to be even vaguely equitabl

I wholeheartedly agree with you.I have a similar problem with my 10 Year old Saab Sport Wagon, earlier and later modelsattract a lower VED for the same emissions, 230g/km.I do approximately 4000 miles a year. We do need to do something to try redress this grossly unfair system.

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