Buyers face confusion three months after Ford Kuga PHEV fire recall

Published 19 October 2020

Three months after Ford halted sales of the Kuga PHEV because overheating batteries led to a small number of vehicles setting on fire, HonestJohn.co.uk has found that multiple dealers are still selling these vehicles.

In August, Ford issued a recall for the new Kuga PHEV (plug-in hybrid) due to a potential fire risk found with the high-voltage battery. Drivers of the plug-in hybrid Ford Kuga are urged not to charge their car for safety.

Ford told HonestJohn.co.uk that a stop sale is currently in place on Kuga PHEV and confirmed that the recall includes all Kuga PHEV models. In addition, a Ford spokesperson said: "The solution to this problem is likely to be measured in months rather than weeks."

However, following an investigation by HonestJohn.co.uk, it has emerged that some Ford dealers are continuing to advertise Kuga PHEVs for sale. What's more, despite saying they couldn't deliver vehicles, the dealers did offer to arrange finance for said vehicles - which are all under a DVSA recall notice.

A Ford spokesperson said: "We advised Ford dealers earlier this month that the stop-sale on Kuga PHEVs included used, in addition to new vehicles. We know there was some Kuga PHEV advertising placed by dealers which could not be stopped after our instruction and this appeared in some media. We were again in contact with dealers last week to remind them of the stop-sale on all new and used Kuga PHEVs and apologise if there has been any confusion for customers."

Ford Kuga Charging

The DVSA told HonestJohn.co.uk: "A second hand dealer who sells a vehicle which can be proven to be unsafe can be liable for prosecution.”

Owners affected by the Ford Kuga PHEV recall have been in touch through Ask HJ, with one reader telling HonestJohn.co.uk he signed up to buy a new Ford Kuga PHEV. He said he was allowed to do an hour-long test drive, too.

The reader said the dealer then asked him to register this car by the end of September as a ‘favour‘ to them, including signing finance papers. But the dealer couldn't confirm a delivery date.

Ford has assured HonestJohn.co.uk that affected vehicles are safe to drive in EV Auto mode only. The carmaker has also released a package of goodwill measures to affected owners, which includes an Extended Warranty/Service Pack and, from Oct 8, a fuel card to the value of £500 - acknowledging that the fuel economy of the cars is higher when the battery can’t be charged.

You can check easily and quickly to see if a vehicle has any outstanding recalls here.

Comments

aethelwulf    on 19 October 2020

Another excellent reason to stick with old technology and leave this new fangled stuff to those with money to burn ( literally). I have a 15 year old Mondeo and 10 year old Piccanto neither of which has ever caught fire. They have depreciated fully now as well so no new cars here until they really wear out.

Tony Maris    on 19 October 2020

Personally, I’d go back to my MGA! the worst that happened was that my floor caught fire at 60mph but at least I could put that out! ??

itdave    on 20 October 2020

I totally agree with aethelwulf, old technology is much more reliable and trustworthy.
I have a 15 year old Nissan Xtrail and have had no trouble at all. It has been treated quite roughly in the things we have loaded into it (rather then driving fast) it is so reliable, why would I change it?

madf    on 27 October 2020

I totally agree with aethelwulf, old technology is much more reliable and trustworthy. I have a 15 year old Nissan Xtrail and have had no trouble at all. It has been treated quite roughly in the things we have loaded into it (rather then driving fast) it is so reliable, why would I change it?

You are JOKING.

Old technology - carburettors for one - was pants. Went out of tune, wasted fuel, starting from cold was often a pia..

You had to grease balljoints.

Drum brakes overheated.

Wipers were pants in heavy rain.

Tyres wore quickly.

Exhausts and cars rotted.

You try driving a mid 1950s car in modern traffic.

Try parking with no power steering.

Nostalgic rubbish

Maltozo    on 20 October 2020

The world is not ready for electric cars, electric cars are not ready for the world...

Edited by Maltozo on 20/10/2020 at 23:04

Austin Matthews    on 21 October 2020

Explore the use of hydrogen - much more eco friendly. AVM

Penumbra    on 27 October 2020

Old tech better eh. What about Ford Focus's catching fire and Vauxhall Zafiras deciding to spontaneously self combust. From 2006 -2010 BMW worldwide have recalled well over 100,000 vehicles for fire related incidents.
Going back further, I had a Triumph 1500 that ignited and burnt out due to a fuel leak in the engine compartment.

Glenn Pawson    on 7 November 2020

I purchased one of these Kuga vehicles in July, it was obvious that Ford new about the issue way before this date. I rejected this vehicle under the "Not fit for purpose" protocol and eventually Ford Credit agreed to take it back. I returned the vehicle to the Stoneacre group over three weeks ago and as yet I still do not have a refund of the monies I paid. Ford have numerous departments dealing with complains and issues are are not efficient at sorting out problems. The MD states that Ford and their customers are one big family but from my experience I seem to be the black sheep.
Any suggestions on how to get my money back without resorting to legal action or will this post lead to a social media storm and embarrass Ford into action?

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