Suzuki Vitara (2015) Review

Looking for a Suzuki Vitara (2015 on)?
Register your interest for later or request to be contacted by a dealer to talk through your options now.

Suzuki Vitara (2015) At A Glance

4/5

+Very good to drive and comfortable. Lots of interior space. Five star Euro NCAP rating. Relatively economical. Excellent 1.0 BoosterJet engines.

-Interior not as plush as rivals but was much improved from 2019.

Insurance Groups are between 11–21
On average it achieves 88% of the official MPG figure

On sale for more than a quarter of a century, the Suzuki Vitara is arguably the original crossover SUV. Unlike 25 years ago, the Vitara now sits amongst a raft of similarly small SUVs - the Nissan Juke, Renault Captur and Vauxhall Mokka X to name a few.

Although it's a competitive market, the Vitara is slightly different to its peers. It's marginally bigger and therefore more practical (although not as big as the likes of the Nissan Qashqai). It's also surprisingly good to drive.

Indeed, it matches many more expensive crossovers for comfort and handling capability. Various engines have been available since it was launched, but the 1.0-litre turbocharged BoosterJet petrol, launched when the Vitara was facelifted for 2019, is our choice, thanks to smooth yet strong performance and little noise.

AllGrip four-wheel drive is an option and provides genuine off-road ability (although it stops short of being a serious mud-plugger - the Jimny's got that covered), while on the road it makes the Vitara feel unflappable. Most buyers opt for the two-wheel-drive version, however, which feels like a Swift-on-stilts (in a good way). It will grip and grip, although there's obviously more roll than the hatch due to the higher centre of gravity.

Style-conscious buyers can choose from a selection of two-tone paint options, as well as a selection of customisation options for the cabin. The interior isn't quite as plush as some rivals, but it feels solid and the touchscreen infotainment system (standard on the SZ-T and up) is easy to use.

The Vitara has up-to-date safety equipment including active systems like adaptive cruise control and automatic braking, as well as a high level of passive safety specification thanks to lightweight but strong bodywork. It scored five stars when it was crash tested by Euro NCAP in 2015.

We think the Vitara offers a lot of space and equipment for the money. It may not be as stylish as other small SUVs nor as desirable, but we think the smart money would go on the Vitara every time. For 2019 the car was brought up to date with an improved interior (you can tell the revised models by the chrome slats on the grille) making it more than a match for the competition.

Looking for a Suzuki Vitara (2015 on)?
Register your interest for later or request to be contacted by a dealer to talk through your options now.

Real MPG average for a Suzuki Vitara (2015)

RealMPG

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

88%

Real MPG

30–70 mpg

MPGs submitted

524

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

Satisfaction Index

Satisfaction Index What is your car like to live with?

We need your help with our latest Satisfaction Index, so that we can help others make a smarter car buying decision. What's it like to live with your car? Love it? Loath it? We want to know. Let us know about your car - it will only take a few minutes and you could be helping thousands of others.

Help us with the Honest John Satisfaction Index now

Ask Honest John

Should I get a catalytic converter lock fitted?
"There have been a lot of reports in my area of catalytic convertors stolen, mainly from the Honda Jazz, Toyota Prius, Toyota Auris and Lexus RX. However, the other day, my neighbour told me the catalytic converter was removed from his 18-year-old BMW Z3. He thinks it was because it doesn't weigh much so it's easy to jack up. I have a three-year-old Suzuki Vitara and wondered whether it's a likely target and whether it's worth fitting a lock plate or similar device. Is this something local garages should be able to supply and fit and how much should I expect to pay? Kind regards."
Catalytic converter theft can happen to anyone. The precious metal in the exhaust systems of hybrids and EVs makes them especially vulnerable but thieves are generally opportunistic. If your neighbour has had his nicked, I'd certainly be thinking about upping the security. Older, low-mileage cars are also vulnerable to catalytic converter theft, but we've heard from readers with all sorts of models (and all sorts of age cars) who've had their's stolen. We don't specifically suggest any catlocks as we haven't tested any so we can't genuinely say how reliable they are — however — a quick Google should give you some sites that'll sell the right locking device. I don't believe Suzuki manufacture their own like Toyota do, but there are still devices out there that might work. More info on how to avoid cat. converter theft here (on our parent site, heycar): https://heycar.co.uk/guides/best-ways-to-prevent-catalytic-converter-theft
Answered by Georgia Petrie
Can you advise on the safety of the keyless models?
"From looking online, it appears that the 2017 Suzuki Vitara SZ5 model was available with keyless or key ignition that year judging by the photos I have seen of the car. Can you advise on the safety of the keyless models in terms of security and whether they have been targeted like other makes or are they safe from theft? Kind regards."
We don't have specific figures on which models are targeted, but it tends to depend on a few factors - like where you live/park. I'd have a read of this: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/what-is-keyless-theft-and-how-can-you-prevent-it/
Answered by Georgia Petrie
What's the best small crossover or SUV for a hilly environment?
"I live in rural Wales and need a small-medium car or SUV with decent ground clearance, which can handle potholes, floods and snow. Service and running costs are also a consideration. It'll be my wife's vehicle to work, about 12k miles per year. About £10k available to purchase a suitable vehicle."
Take a look at the Suzuki Vitara. It's a brilliant little crossover SUV that sounds like it'd suit your wife's requirements well. It'll be cheap to run, too. We'd also recommend a Honda HR-V or, if your wife would prefer a hatchback, take a look at the Ford Fiesta Active. It's a Fiesta with an increased ride height which should provide a bit more confidence on rural roads. It might push the budget but there are a few available for less than £10,000.
Answered by Andrew Brady
Should I swap my Vauxhall Corsa for a Kia Rio?
"I currently have a 2010 Vauxhall Corsa. Although it's a really slow car, I've liked it as it's roomy inside and feels solid and safe. It's just passed its MOT but urgently needs 2 new tyres and, at some point, new brake pads. I had to have the timing chain replaced last year, which wasn't cheap and a few other things - so I was looking at a new car. A few people said to get a Kia and I've seen a 2017 Kia Rio for £8999 - but I don't know if that's a good price/good car. The Kia Sportage looks a good car but I don't really need such a big vehicle and would need to get an older model to afford one. What do you think? Thanks."
The Kia Rio's a good little car. It'll be a bit more spacious than your Corsa and, as you've said, will come with a lengthy amount of warranty remaining (provided it's been serviced correctly). Also consider the very similar Hyundai i20 or, if practicality's important, a Honda Jazz is also a good choice. The Kia Sportage is a great car but, as you say, quite a bit bigger than your Corsa or a Kia Rio. If a slightly bigger crossover vehicle appeals, consider a Suzuki Vitara. It's a bit smaller than a Sportage and will be very reliable and cheap to run.
Answered by Andrew Brady

What does a Suzuki Vitara (2015) cost?

Buy new from £16,861 (list price from £22,239)