What kind of chemistry do you have with your car? Love it? Loathe it? Let us know and you could win a £300 John Lewis voucher | No thanks

Hyundai unveils all-new i10 city car

Published 10 September 2019

Hyundai has unveiled the all-new i10. The petrol-powered city car will offer more interior space and get a sporty N-line trim when it goes on sale in early 2020. Prices are expected to start in the region of £9500.

The 2020 i10 will provide better comfort and refinement, say Hyundai, while the new sporty N-line trim level (pictured here) should provide some warm hatch appeal.

From launch, the new Hyundai i10 is sold with a 100PS three-cylinder 1.0-litre T-GDi engine with 172Nm of torque. Buyers can also spec a four-cylinder 1.2-litre MPi engine with 84PS and 118Nm of torque - both are linked to five-speed manual gearbox as standard, while an automated manual will be an optional extra. 

The interior should provide better space for the driver and passengers, with the 2020 i10 being 10mm longer and 20mm wider than the outgoing model. Bootspace is unchanged, however, with the i10 providing 252 litres with the rear seats in place.  

I 10 N Line _interior (1)

Hyundai has only release interior pictures of the warm hatch i10N version. This includes an N-branded steering wheel and gearstick, while the dashboard gets red air vents and ventilation controls. A pair of sports seats for the driver and front passenger complete the N makeover. 

The i10 will be offered with an eight-inch touchscreen infotainment system, with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto compatibility. Wireless phone charging and a rear-view camera will also be available.  

Fuel economy and CO2 ratings are still to be confirmed, but the 1.2-litre MPi engine is expected to return up to 53mpg and 121g/km. The i10 will also retain its nimble city-friendly nature, with a turning radius of just five metres. 

The 2020 Hyundai i10 will go on sale in early 2020 and be backed by a five-year-warranty as standard. The N-line trim level will - in styling at least - put the i10 alongside the i30 N hatcback and Fastback

Comments

21Twinkle    on 10 September 2019

Uh - OOO - The start of PROPER (Torque converter) automatic gearboxes, disappearing from vehicles Hyundai used to fit TC boxes to cars - now I see that the latest i10 is coming with a HORRIBLE automated box - even the "sporty" N-line version .. The start of the loss of proper driving ? Hope not

Edited by 21Twinkle on 10/09/2019 at 14:23

Engineer Andy    on 10 September 2019

Uh - OOO - The start of PROPER (Torque converter) automatic gearboxes, disappearing from vehicles Hyundai used to fit TC boxes to cars - now I see that the latest i10 is coming with a HORRIBLE automated box - even the "sporty" N-line version .. The start of the loss of proper driving ? Hope not

I think that their 'automated manual' is likely to be their dual clutch auto, which from the lack of complaints, appears to be far more reliable than VAG's DSG and Ford's now defunct Powershift equiavelents. They were probably slowly replacing them as new models came through, as they did on the larger cars.

I would still shy away from that system, mainly because they are still designed for use in open-road/performance driving, rather than slo-speed driving (especially crawling along at walking space/start-stop) in heavy traffic. TCs and (decent) CVTs are far more suitable for that sort of usage, even if the former is less efficient.

I would be worried about long term reliability (over 10yo, much more than the DSGs and PSs), mainly because I keep my cars a long time and don't want to have to fork out for an expensive new box.

Slow Eddie    7 days ago

On the subject of boxes, you should get back in yours and not come out until you have something worthy to contribute.

What a nasty response. Try taking your own advice.

Engineer Andy    6 days ago

Uh - OOO - The start of PROPER (Torque converter) automatic gearboxes, disappearing from vehicles Hyundai used to fit TC boxes to cars - now I see that the latest i10 is coming with a HORRIBLE automated box - even the "sporty" N-line version .. The start of the loss of proper driving ? Hope not

I think that their 'automated manual' is likely to be their dual clutch auto, which from the lack of complaints, appears to be far more reliable than VAG's DSG and Ford's now defunct Powershift equiavelents. They were probably slowly replacing them as new models came through, as they did on the larger cars.

I would still shy away from that system, mainly because they are still designed for use in open-road/performance driving, rather than slo-speed driving (especially crawling along at walking space/start-stop) in heavy traffic. TCs and (decent) CVTs are far more suitable for that sort of usage, even if the former is less efficient.

I would be worried about long term reliability (over 10yo, much more than the DSGs and PSs), mainly because I keep my cars a long time and don't want to have to fork out for an expensive new box.

Ah yes, it was just a matter of time...'automated manual' is JUST THAT. It is NOT ANY FORM OR DERIVATIVE of a DCT. So full of yourself and why?. It is noticed that you use the first person singular to excess...look it up if you don't understand. Tell us all what you drive, considering you are the leader in the field wrt automotive affairs?.

If you had worked hard (or even at all) at school, you might have made it to become a 'proper' engineer, earning enough money to change your car more often and not have "to fork out" for costly repairs...or perhaps you simply don't look after your cars.

On the subject of boxes, you should get back in yours and not come out until you have something worthy to contribute. Can't even spell equivalents correctly. I, I, I, I.........:)

But that's just it - I have earned a decent amount, but because I chose wisely, I haven't had to, as you say, fork out for many costly repairs - my car, in it 13+ year life, has never broken down once (touch wood), and has only had maintenance on standard wear and tear items. Nor did I spend a load of money buying the car either, so it has worked out well.

It's sad that you constantly feel the need to make such unwarrented and nasty comments and to constantly troll me, Slow Eddie and others for no apparent reason other then you appear to like doing so and we don't share your viewpoint. Perhaps you would feel more comfortable trolling elsewhere, given you don't appear to have anything useful to contribute to the discussion.

Edited by Engineer Andy on 12/09/2019 at 12:09

gavsmit    7 days ago

I so wanted to like this car. As an owner of the current i10 I've been very impressed with it, so was looking forward to the new model and a possible 'N' sports version to compete with the VW Up GTi.

But I can't help but feel disappointed by the new model and the N-Line version.

For me the styling isn't great, a far cry from the concept sketch (as Hyundai / Kia always end up), with the biggest problem of the current car carried forward (the pointless upward tick of bodywork ruining rear visibility).

Moving onto the N Line model, the front gapping grill looks over the top for a car with just 99bhp, and judging by youtube videos on the interior, doesn't even feature the nice faux-leather seats that the equivalent Kia Picanto GT-Line has (I guess the i10 N-Line will cost more than the equivalent Picanto but offer less equipment). It's also a missed opportunity that Hyundai haven't used the higher output 120 PS 1.0 T-GDi engine for a true N version.

A lot has been made of this car being the most advanced in its class for tech, but I, and others, don't want all that pointless stuff as it's just another load of expensive stuff to go wrong outside of warranty. Especially in what's supposed to be a cheap city car.

So I think I'm going to pop off down to my local Kia dealership to test drive a Picanto GT-Line. With honestjohn's site showing that you can get one in the GT-Line spec with the 1.0 T-GDi engine for just under £11k after discount, and the Hyundai i10 N Line no doubt going to have a HUGE list price with little chance for discount from launch, I'd probably be a bit silly waiting until next year for the i10 N Line.

Sulphur Man    7 days ago

The current i10/Picanto auto 4-spd torque convertor is a car that fits its brief perfectly. Smooth reliable TC auto. Fair economy figures. Painless.
The new 'automated manual' box will need to match it, else they will lose sales, a la Honda i-Shift, VW ADC, etc.

Razor 1955    7 days ago

The current i10 is a very pretty car, well equipped and competitively priced.

The new one is quite ugly, and at least £2000 more expensive. There are better choices out there at this price. The high level of available equipment will also add to the price. No longer a bargain buy and no wonder that the "Vauxhall front" looks so miserable,

Sir Lancelot    7 days ago

The HORRIBLE automated box is enough to put anyone off... No TC box - nor will I buy.

Engineer Andy    6 days ago

I would wait to see if it was an automated manual like the Honda i-Shift or perhaps someone from their PR dept mis-spoke in describing it and it's actually a DCT (like the rest of their newer car line-up), which is in many respect technically an automated manual. I would be surprised if they went with a tehcnology many other makes could get to work.

Edited by Engineer Andy on 12/09/2019 at 12:31

mmmmm    6 days ago

I would wait to see if it was an automated manual like the Honda i-Shift or perhaps someone from their PR dept mis-spoke in describing it and it's actually a DCT (like the rest of their newer car line-up), which is in many respect technically an automated manual. I would be surprised if they went with a tehcnology many other makes could get to work.

In precisely what respects is a DCT, technically an automated manual?.

Engineer Andy    6 days ago

I would wait to see if it was an automated manual like the Honda i-Shift or perhaps someone from their PR dept mis-spoke in describing it and it's actually a DCT (like the rest of their newer car line-up), which is in many respect technically an automated manual. I would be surprised if they went with a tehcnology many other makes could get to work.

In precisely what respects is a DCT, technically an automated manual?.

It has a clutch system, and you can go up or down the gears yourself rather than letting the car decide.

mmmmm    6 days ago

I would wait to see if it was an automated manual like the Honda i-Shift or perhaps someone from their PR dept mis-spoke in describing it and it's actually a DCT (like the rest of their newer car line-up), which is in many respect technically an automated manual. I would be surprised if they went with a tehcnology many other makes could get to work.

In precisely what respects is a DCT, technically an automated manual?.

It has a clutch system, and you can go up or down the gears yourself rather than letting the car decide.

No different to a TC, with paddles. You did not address the question, simply illustrated one common function...so will ask again, in precisely what respects (plural and in detail) is a DCT, technically an automated manual?.

Engineer Andy    5 days ago

https://lmgtfy.com/?q=torque+converter+vs+dual+clutch&p=1

Cheers mate. A shame some other people here seem to think trolling and repeated insults are a useful addition to the debate...

Add a comment

 

Ask Honest John

Value my car