Spare wheels - do we really need them anymore?

When we bought my wife's Honda Jazz it came with a tyre repair kit but we could buy a spare, and this came in handy when she hit a kerbstone and ruptured a tyre.

I'm about to get a Lexus UX. I could not get one with the 18-inch wheels and run-flats (none were available) and have had to settle for the 17-inch wheel version which comes with a can of repair gunk

I don't think there is a designated space for a spare wheel. So it looks like I have no alternative. Am I being foolish in worrying about driving long distance with just a repair kit, or have things moved on since I last bought a car?

Asked on 19 January 2022 by

Answered by Andrew Brady
While it's comforting to have a spare wheel, it's certainly becoming less and less common. This is partly due to strict CO2 emission targets – every kilogram needs to be accounted for, and a spare wheel adds unnecessary weight (and therefore CO2 emissions).

In hybrid vehicles, like the Lexus UX, it's often the case that there simply isn't the space for a spare wheel – the hybrid batteries are positioned underneath the boot floor. In our experience, the tyre repair kits aren't particularly reliable but breakdown service providers are now very well prepared for dealing with punctures (they carry multi-fit spare wheels to allow you to continue to a garage).
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