We bought a vehicle that isn't fit for purpose. How do we get our money back?

My daughter just bought a horsebox that was converted for her. She took delivery on Friday. She took it for a drive yesterday after she taxed it, but oil is pouring out of the head gasket area and dripping all over the drive. Plus, the indicators don't seem to work, yet she was handed a new MOT with it. Where can we start to recover her money? The dealer said the van is under 6 months warranty and he would send a fitter to look at the problems, but later in the day, he said to take it to a garage. We don't think this is advisable as he may say we have caused the problems with our garage What would your advice be, please? Thank you.

Asked on 2 December 2020 by keith yearsley

Answered by Dan Powell
The 2015 Consumer Rights Act gives you the statutory right to reject a new or used vehicle (or anything else) within 30 days of purchase. This is called the short term 'right to reject'. It covers faults that were present - or developing - when you bought it, or it was received in a condition that does not match what you were told. But it'll be up to you to prove that's the case. After 30 days you lose the short-term right to reject: www.honestjohn.co.uk/problems-with-a-new-or-used-c...#
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