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New 2020 Honda Jazz: all you need to know

Published 24 October 2019

The new Honda Jazz will go on sale in 2020 with a petrol-electric hybrid engine as standard and a beefed-up crossover version on offer.

It comes as Honda announces plans to sell electrified versions of all its mainstream models in Europe by 2022, with the new Jazz being the first to feature ‘e:HEV’ branding.

>>Honda to scrap diesels as range goes electric and hybrid

True to Jazz form, the new small hatchback will feature high levels of practicality and versatility. Engineers have incorporated the hybrid drivetrain into the chassis and within the engine bay, ensuring cabin space has been maximised.

Unusually, the fuel tank is located beneath the front seats, allowing the Jazz to keep its trick Magic Seats which can flip and fold as required to increase luggage space. The front and rear seats have been improved to provide more support on long journeys, while narrower windscreen pillars provides a better view of the road ahead and gives the cabin an airy feel. 

Honda Jazz 2

The interior resembles the tech-heavy cabin of the Honda e, with a new LCD touchscreen offering Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, which is available via a wireless connection. There’s also a WiFi hotspot built into the car while a smartphone-style display provides access to a number of apps.

Details of the hybrid powertrain are yet to be confirmed, but it’s expected to be a scaled down version of the system used in the CR-V Hybrid. This scalable technology will save Honda money which means the Jazz is likely to remain a value-for-money small hatchback, although prices are yet to be confirmed.

The crossover model, badged the Crosstar, is intended to appeal to a younger audience who want to convey a more outdoorsy image. It features increased ride height, a bespoke front grille, water-resistant upholstery and integrated roof rails.

We’ll find out more about the new Honda Jazz early next year ahead of it going on sale in the UK later in 2020.

Comments

gavsmit    on 24 October 2019

I was initially shocked at how bland it looked in a leaked brochure picture, but it's modern simplicity, with the right trim level and wheels, is growing on me. Good to see they've resisted the ridiculous 'fashionable' trend of reducing rear visibility with a rear quarter upward tick eating into window space (e.g. the next Toyota Yaris and quite a few other new models).

Shame they aren't offering a full electric version (yet). That would be a much more suitable car for electrification than the somewhat disappointing Honda e in my opinion.

3.0S    on 24 October 2019

I was initially shocked at how bland it looked in a leaked brochure picture, but it's modern simplicity, with the right trim level and wheels, is growing on me. Good to see they've resisted the ridiculous 'fashionable' trend of reducing rear visibility with a rear quarter upward tick eating into window space (e.g. the next Toyota Yaris and quite a few other new models). Shame they aren't offering a full electric version (yet). That would be a much more suitable car for electrification than the somewhat disappointing Honda e in my opinion.

Believe that the only disappointing aspect of the e, are those expressing their disappointment.

VINCENT MILLARD    on 29 October 2019

I think the real shame is that it won't be made in the UK, as Honda are pulling out!

aufdermaur    on 30 October 2019

I'd like a lowered and more sporty version please, to appeal to the yoof

conman    on 1 November 2019

The only reason they will not be built in the UK is that the EU gave them a free trade agreement so they can import them direct from the place they are made and not have to pay an import tax. This EU decision would not have been made so that Honda could close it's factory in the UK!!!!. I wonder if the same decision would have been made by the EU if the factory had been in France or Germany. Also PSA buying Vauxhall !!!.

This country has had it,

Most of the profits from Electric and gas companies, Railway companies, building Nuclear power stations, motor production etc. etc. go abroad, the UK citizen gets a bad deal .

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