Review: Jaguar XE (2015)

Rating:

Strong alternative to the BMW 3 Series and Mercedes-Benz C-Class. Superb ride comfort and fuel economy. Eight-speed automatic is excellent. Interior is much improved from 2019.

Not a lot of room in the back. Boot is smaller than its rivals.

Recently Added To This Review

2 September 2019

Report of "buzzing or rattling" sound from "passenger side" of engine of 2015 Jaguar XE 163 diesel auto. Once up to speed the noise disappears. It occasionally reappears when the car has been driven... Read more

6 July 2019

Report of 2015 Jaguar XE R Sport getting MoT advisory to replace rear brake discs at 40,000 miles at a cost of £505.52. Read more

13 June 2019

Report of warning light on dash of 2016 Jaguar XE 2.0 diesel 163PS at 73,000 miles. Independent Jaguar specialist thought it was camshaft sensor but wasn't sure. Suggested it might be a timing chain... Read more

Jaguar XE (2015): At A Glance

With attractive styling, a satisfying drive and - from 2019 - a much-improved interior, the Jaguar XE is a strong competitor to the likes of the Mercedes-Benz C-Class, Audi A4 and BMW 3 Series.

The Jaguar XE takes a lot of its styling cues from the XF, using the same aluminium construction techniques to rival its German counterparts for weight and rigidity. As a result the XE is extremely good to drive. The suspension also impresses, striking a good balance between comfort and engagement when it comes to tackling challenging corners. 

Power comes from a range of four and six-cylinder all-aluminium petrol and diesel engines, with the headliner being the 2.0-litre Ingenium diesel, which returns an official 57.6mpg. 

While initially available with a six-speed manual gearbox, an excellent eight-speed automatic gearbox is now standard across the range. Rear- and all-wheel-drive variants are available.

The cabin of the XE is comfortable and well-equipped, with cruise control, navigation and a smart rising rotary controller - for automatics - included as standard on early models. However, there are a few areas that initially disappointed on quality and some of the plastics felt below par. The layout of the dashboard and conservative styling also lacks the innovation of Audi and BMW equivalents, which makes the XE feel a little dull inside.

Things were improved for 2019, when Jaguar's Touch Pro Duo infotainment system - as seen on the i-Pace - was offered for the first time. This uses a pair of touchscreen displays in the centre of the dash, providing access to navigation and Apple CarPlay, as well as climate control settings. It's slick to use and does a really good job of modernising the interior.

Unfortunately, the XE doesn't match its rivals for practicality. Its sloping roof and limited rear legroom makes it a tight fit for large adults, while its 455-litre boot isn't as big as German rivals. The narrow opening can make loading large items tricky, too, and there isn't an estate model available.

The Jaguar XE is still an impressive car though, particularly following its 2019 updates. It's great to drive (although the BMW 3 Series is slightly better), and the interior feels tech-packed and up-to-date (if not as plush as the Mercedes-Benz C-Class).

Jaguar XE 2015 Range Road Test

What does a Jaguar XE (2015) cost?

List Price from £33,900
Buy new from £26,987
Contract hire from £244.93 per month

Jaguar XE (2015): What's It Like Inside?

Dimensions
Length 4672 mm
Width 2075 mm
Height 1416–1425 mm
Wheelbase 2835 mm

Full specifications

The XE reflects Jaguar's sports car design ethos when it comes to the interior, in the sense the cabin cossets its occupants in very much the same manner as the F-Type, with a snug fit that provides lots of comfort but not a lot of room to spare.

The XE is effectively a four-seater, due to the fact that the middle rear seat has very little leg room. That's down to the raised floor and centre console, which extends into the rear. Head and legroom in the back is also at a premium, with the sloping roof making it a tight fit for large adults.

The cabin is comfortable though and the large seats provide lots of support across the shoulders and lower back, making them good for long trips. The interior is also finished to a generally high standard, although some of the plastics at the bottom of the doors and pillars feel a little cheap and unbefitting of a Jaguar.

Things improved in 2019, when the car was updated with more upmarket materials, a new steering wheel and a more conventional automatic gear selector rather than the rotary dial of the pre-facelift car.

The biggest change is the introduction of Jaguar's Touch Pro Duo infotainment system, which offers two high-resolution touchscreens - one on top of the other, providing access to everything from navigation to Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, as well as climate control settings. It works well, having two different screens, with everything easy to find without being too distracting like some touchscreen systems.

Our only criticism of the setup is the landscape top screen is very wide, giving you a good view of the area around you in navigation mode, rather than the road ahead...

Another trick gadget is the ClearSight interior rearview mirror, which made its debut on the Range Rover Evoque and is now available as an option on the XE. This can work as a conventional mirror, or use cameras to display a view of what's behind - ideal if you're carrying passengers, for example, or driving at night or in poor conditions.

The driving position is excellent, with a clear view of the road and lots of adjustments for the front seats and steering wheel. The digital instrument cluster (new from 2019) is also easy to understand and the straightforward steering-wheel mounted controls make it simple to access the infotainment, navigation while on the move. 

The XE gets a 455-litre boot, which is the smallest in the class with both the 3 Series and C-Class getting 25 litres more. The opening is also narrow and awkward for loading large items, although the rear seats do fold down to allow long items like golf club bags to be loaded. Unfortunately, there's no estate option.

Standard Equipment (July 2019):

SE models feature 17-inch alloy wheels, fabric seats with eight-way manual adjustment, gloass black trim finishers, soft grain leather steering wheel, all surface progress control, rear armrest with twin cupholders, premium carpet mats, metal treadplates with Jaguar script, auto-dimming interior rear view mirror, bright metal pedals.

Prestige trim adds grained leather seats, dark satin brushed aluminium trim finisher, soft grain leather sport seering wheel, ambient interior lighting, heated front seats.

Portfolio includes 18-inch alloy wheels, perforated Windsor leather seats with 10-way electric adjustment, embossed aluminium trim finisher, headlight powerwash, bi-function xenon headlights.

R-Sport models get five-spoke 18-inch alloy wheels, perforated grained leather sport seats with contrast stitching (with eight-way manual adjustment), R-sport branded soft grain leather steering wheel, black radiator grille with satin chrome surround, etched aluminium trim finishers, R-Sport bodykit.

Landmark trim adds exclusive 18-inch alloy wheels, sport front bumper, body-coloured side sills and boot spoiler, gloss black side window surrounds, grille surround and mirror caps, gloss black exterior side vents with Landmark badging, perforated grained leather sport seats, Landmark branded tread plates.

300 Sport comes with exclusive 19-inch alloy wheels with dark satin grey metallic finish, dark satin grey highlights (including grille surround, window surrounds, side sills and vents, mirror caps, rear valance and boot spoiler), 300 Sport brand multi-function steering wheel with yellow contrast stitching, 300 Sport brand treadplates, sport seats, black brake calipers.

Child seats that fit a Jaguar XE (2015)

Our unique Car Seat Chooser shows you which child car seats will fit this car and which seat positions that they will fit, so that you don't have to check every car seat manufacturer's website for compatibility.

Which car seat will suit you?

What's the Jaguar XE (2015) like to drive?

The Jaguar XE is aimed at fleets and company car drivers, which means most cars will be diesel. Initially, the XE was available with a 163PS Ingenium diesel but this was dropped in 2019, meaning the 180PS model is now the most frugal option, officially returning 50.7mpg and emitting 130g/km CO2.

The four-cylinder diesel, badged the D180, is available as rear- or four-wheel drive, while a four-cylinder turbocharged petrol is also available with 250 or 300PS. The P250 is rear-drive, while the P300 is all-wheel drive.

While the petrols are very good, the diesel suits the car very well. It's got plenty of torque and the eight-speed automatic gearbox is excellent, quickly selecting the correct gear in a fuss-free manner.

Earlier models are available with a six-speed manual gearbox, but this is best avoided as it hasn't got the most pleasant gear change and a lack of torque low down in the rev range means you have to use a surprising amount of revs to get the XE moving. This is masked by the automatic gearbox, but it's not a pleasant experience in the manual.

On the road the XE is good to drive, with finely weighted steering and impressive body control. This means it can be pushed quite hard through a series of tight corners, with its excellent balance and grip levels making it genuinely engaging at speed.

It's not quite as fun to drive as a BMW 3 Series, but the XE is also an impressive motorway cruiser and will quietly cover huge distances with Jaguar like serenity, thanks to its low level of road and wind noise.

Ride quality is very good, with lots of suppression against pot holes or coarse road surfaces. 

Engine MPG 0-62 CO2
2.0d 163 60 mpg 8.4 s 99 g/km
2.0d 163 Automatic 55 mpg 8.2 s 106 g/km
2.0d 180 55–58 mpg 7.8–8.3 s 109–129 g/km
2.0d 180 Automatic 53–54 mpg 7.8–8.1 s 109–141 g/km
2.0d 180 Automatic 4WD 50–51 mpg 6.5–8.4 s 123–153 g/km
2.0d 240 Automatic 4WD 48–50 mpg 6.1–6.5 s 137–153 g/km
2.0d 240 Automatic AWD 48 mpg 6.1 s 137 g/km
2.0i 200 Automatic 38–45 mpg 7.1–7.6 s 144–179 g/km
2.0i 240 Automatic 38 mpg 6.5 s 179 g/km
2.0i 250 Automatic 39–40 mpg 6.3–6.5 s 144–167 g/km
2.0i 250 Automatic 4WD 42 mpg 6.2 s 154 g/km
2.0i 300 Automatic 4WD 37–38 mpg 5.5–5.7 s 157–173 g/km
3.0i 340 S Automatic 35 mpg 4.9 s 194 g/km
3.0i 380 S Automatic 35 mpg 5.0 s 194 g/km

Real MPG average for a Jaguar XE (2015)

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

94%

Real MPG

25–68 mpg

MPGs submitted

280

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

What have we been asked about the Jaguar XE (2015)?

Every day we're asked hundreds of questions from car buyers and owners through Ask Honest John. Our team of experts, including the nation's favourite motoring agony uncle - Honest John himself - answer queries and conudrums ranging from what car to buy to how to care for it as an owner. If you could do with a spot of friendly advice before buying you're next car, get in touch and we'll do what we can to help.

Ask HJ

Am I mad to want to buy a Jaguar as my last car?

My first car bought in Malaya in 1954 was a used Jaguar one and half litre. When I sold it I promised myself that my last car would be a Jaguar. I am now in position to buy a used Jaguar for around £20K. My wife thinks that at 85 I must be mad, what do you think?
Sadly, the Jaguar XE has not been anything like as popular as Jaguar had hoped (not even selling the the volumes of the old X-Type). If you go for one, the diesels have not been too much trouble and are EU6, but still better to buy one with a petrol engine. Go for the smallest wheels with the deepest profile tyres you can find.
Answered by Honest John
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