Must a driver move through a red light if ordered to do so by a police officer?

I refer to MB of Guildford’s enquiry, and to your response, regarding what action to take if you are impeding an emergency vehicle on "blues and twos". He is correct when he says that motorists have been fined for, say, crossing the 'Stop' line at red traffic lights. One motorist wrote to a motoring magazine and said you should not do it. His letter elicited a reply from a senior police officer who said that if he were on "blues and twos" and a motorist failed to get out of his way, then he (the police officer) would prosecute the motorist for "obstructing a police officer in the execution of his duty". You can't win. The Home Office has never clarified this situation with directives to motorists and police as to the correct approach to be taken by both parties.

Asked on 22 September 2012 by NP, via email

Answered by Honest John
As I wrote, if you are instructed to go through a red light by a police officer in uniform, then you must do so. A liveried police car constitutes a police officer in uniform. A fire engine or an ambulance does not. But I agree. It is incredible that they can't get their act together and either make a sensible law or issue proper guidance.
Similar questions
What's the position where you are 'forced' across a red light with camera by a police car? It happened to someone in the lane next to me yesterday and could have been me. The police car came up behind...
How is one supposed to know if a police officer is ordering them forward at a red traffic light if you cannot see anything obvious in the rear view mirror? Is sounding their siren enough? In these days...
Could you clarify the legal position when one of the emergency services, with blue lights flashing and siren sounding, needs to cross a red light where traffic is blocking their progress. Is it permissible...
 

Value my car