Are electric car prices increasing soon due to Brexit?

We're looking at a Smart ForTwo EQ for a 25-mile daily commute in London (given rumblings about the congestion charge zone being extended). We've been quoted what seems like a good price (£14,400) for the base model with metallic paint. This obviously includes the £3000 government grant and includes free wall box installation. The dealer tells us that the £3000 grant will not be available beyond the end of the year, plus any factory orders in 2021 could be subject to a 10% import levy as a result of Brexit. Is this sales patter to get a quick sale?

Asked on 26 October 2020 by thisisbeaker

Answered by Andrew Brady
The grant for electric vehicles is gradually being reduced. The latest £3000 grant for fully-electric vehicles was introduced in March 2020 and, while the Office for Low Emission Vehicles hasn't provided a cut-off date for this grant, it has suggested that it won't be available forever. If the UK fails to secure a trade deal with the EU, the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) has warned that the price of EVs could be hiked by an average of £2800. So, while the dealer will be using these figures to encourage a quick sale, they're not entirely baseless.
Similar questions
I've ordered a Tesla Model 3. I want to use the grant to get a wall charger for my driveway. The options for the chargers are a little confusing, as well as the independent installers. Do you have any...
I signed for an electric car (Nissan Leaf) on 9 March 2020 with an EV Grant of £3500 and I'm due to take delivery on the 16. Will I still get £3500 or will it be £3000?
Which is the cheapest and most reliable electric city car for driving in London?
Related models
Affordable electric car. Very low running costs. Fun to drive around town.
 

Ask Honest John

Value my car