Vauxhall Meriva (2010 – 2017) Review

Vauxhall Meriva (2010 – 2017) At A Glance

3/5

+Practical and easy to get in and out of. Facelifted 2014 models get impressive new 1.6-litre CDTi engine.

-Spacesaver spare a £105 option. Pricey top models. Old 1.7-litre CDTi best avoided. Suspension is set-up for sportiness rather than comfort.

Insurance Groups are between 5–17
On average it achieves 81% of the official MPG figure

The second-generation Vauxhall Meriva was a huge step-forward from its predecessor and established itself as an innovative and very capable small people carrier. Despite facing tougher opposition from with the C-MAX and the likes of the Citroen C3 Picasso, the Meriva still has plenty to recommend it.

The big talking point is its unique Flexdoor arrangement. Vauxhall has gone for rear-hinged rear doors, which if nothing else offer a significant talking point. We used to call them ‘suicide doors’, but since then, they've been fitted to several cars, such as the Rolls Royce Phantom.

The doors have various locking systems which make them safe and it's fair to say that they are more than just a gimmick. Both they and the front doors open extra wide (with four separate click-stops) and facilitate very easy entry and exit.

For 2014, the Meriva received a subtle facelift. The styling, which needed little in the way of updating, remains as it was with staggered side windows which give rear seat passengers more glass area. Ideal for children in the back who are prone to car sickness. The clever seating and luggage arrangements remain as they were.

The big news is the arrival of a new 1.6-litre CDTi unit that Vauxhall calls the 'Whisper Diesel', which will eventually replace the old 1.3-litre and pensionable 1.7-litre diesels. Also, the appealing 1.4-litre turbo engine has been tweaked for lower emissions and improved fuel consumption.

If you're looking for a small MPV, the Meriva is a worth considering. The quirky Flexdoors are a user-friendly feature and it has a spacious interior with good rear passenger room. Rather oddly for a family car it feels like a driver's MPV, with a handling balance baised towards the sporting side. If you're after the last word in comfort, you may well want to look elsewhere.

Real MPG average for a Vauxhall Meriva (2010 – 2017)

RealMPG

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

81%

Real MPG

24–59 mpg

MPGs submitted

499

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

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Ask Honest John

Unhappy about Vauxhall's Lifetime warranty - should I complain?
"I took my Vauxhall Meriva into the same main dealer as last year for a service to keep my Lifetime warranty up. They said my sump plug was stripped and would need a Helicore Insert at £89.63! On my Lifetime warranty it states components covered: engine. If a thread on a sump plug hole isn't the engine why did they fix the faulty water pump then? That's the engine. The plug has only been out 10/11 times in its life. They say it's a wear and tear item. Why doesn't my warranty cover it? Would an email to the CEO do any good? "
It will be difficult to prove it is a manufacturing fault but I suggest you make a formal complaint, in writing, to the service manager of the dealer. If that doesn’t work, try complaining to Vauxhall too.
Answered by Sarah Tooze
Why does an MoT check bring up a different car?
"I'm considering buying a Vauxhall Meriva but when I did an MoT check on the registration it came up with a Vauxhall Corsa. Is the Meriva part of the Corsa range?"
The Meriva and Corsa are two completely different cars. The MoT check should show the correct model. If it doesn't then it would suggest an issue with the car itself or the DVLA registration. Either way, I'd suggest finding another car for sale.
Answered by Dan Powell
Battery failure on a recently purchased used car - who is responsible?
"I bought a Meriva from a Vauxhall main dealer less than three months ago, but the battery has now failed. Are they responsible for replacing it?"
Depends on your definition of "failure". If the battery has run flat because the car has been parked up for many weeks doing nothing then the answer would be no. Most car batteries will run out of charge if the car isn't used for long periods. And jump-starting the car incorrectly can cause terminal battery damage that will prevent it from holding a full charge ever again. If, on the other hand, the battery has suddenly stopped holding a charge and car usage isn't to blame then I would say yes, the dealer is liable. A battery shouldn't suddenly fail. If it does, I would argue it had a preexisting fault at the time you bought the car.
Answered by Dan Powell
Is there any reason to buy a Mercedes B-Class to replace my Vauxhall Meriva apart from badge prestige?
"I'm looking to replace a Meriva A and am looking at a Meriva B, which seems the best value to buy used. A Dacia Logan, which is slightly more expensive used, is cheaper to run. A Mercedes-Benz B-Class is more expensive to buy and run - but is there any reason to pay more for the Mercedes apart from badge prestige?"
The B-Class will have a much more premium interior and is better to drive than the Logan and Meriva. It depends whether you want value for money or something a bit more luxurious.
Answered by Andrew Brady
More Questions

What does a Vauxhall Meriva (2010 – 2017) cost?