Logic of Automatic selector gate - LeighB
Having recently acquired an auto, not having driven one for some years, I have been wondering why the D and R positions in the gate seem to be the reverse of normal logic.
If I had to design such a thing from scratch I would put D ahead of the N position and R behind. (Forward for ahead and back for reverse)
What is the explanation for the apparently perverse logic here?
I assume there is one, and that is not the result of a daft moment way back when autos were first built.
A further worse thought, perhaps not all manufacturers use the same gate layout!
Logic of Automatic selector gate - Hamsafar
PRND321
PDNR321?
PD321NR?

But 321 has tofollow D
So how do you rearrange this so that a manual selection doesn't go through R?
Logic of Automatic selector gate - Micky
D321NR and use the handbrake? Forward to go forward and back to go back.
Logic of Automatic selector gate - cheddar
PND321R

or

RPND321
Logic of Automatic selector gate - cheddar
Actually perhaps:

123DNRP
Logic of Automatic selector gate - LeighB
It seems there are a lot of gate layouts?
Mine is PRNDS - with the "manual" selection off to one side (VAG DSG gearbox)
So in full auto it is forward to go back and vice versa.
Is it perhaps a hangover from early manual 3 speed gearboxes? Reverse L and up, 1st straight back, and 2nd and 3rd across the gate, but I seem to recall that some were the other way round then as well!
Logic of Automatic selector gate - AllTorque
Remember the old Daf 33/44/55/66 etc - push forward to go forward, and back to go back.

They would also do the same speed in reverse as they would going forward......
Logic of Automatic selector gate - machika
I have always wondered why HJ thinks that most tiptronic selectors are the wrong way round, i.e. forward to move up a gear and back to change down? Any thoughts on this?
Logic of Automatic selector gate - rjr
Tiptronic selectors that use forward to move up a gear and back to change down are not logical when you compare it to the movements you would make when using a manual gearbox.

For example, changing up from 1st to 2nd, 3rd to 4th or 5th to 6th involves moving the gearstick back and changing down the gears involves moving the gearstick forwards.
Logic of Automatic selector gate - Vin {P}
"For example, changing up from 1st to 2nd, 3rd to 4th or 5th to 6th involves moving the gearstick back and changing down the gears involves moving the gearstick forwards."

And for example, 2nd to 3rd, 4th to 5th are the opposite!

V
Logic of Automatic selector gate - rjr
"And for example, 2nd to 3rd, 4th to 5th are the opposite!"

Not exactly, they involve moving the gearstick right as well as up so they don't mirror the movement of a tiptronic box.
Logic of Automatic selector gate - machika
"And for example, 2nd to 3rd, 4th to 5th are the
opposite!"
Not exactly, they involve moving the gearstick right as well as
up so they don't mirror the movement of a tiptronic box.


The movement is mainly forward though.
Logic of Automatic selector gate - rjr
"The movement is mainly forward though."

But still very different to the movement of a tiptronic box - try it if you don't believe me!
Logic of Automatic selector gate - Statistical outlier
I always thought it was just a more natural movement under likely prevailing acceleration.

When accelerating, it's a natural movement to pull back the lever as you're pushed back in the car. Likewise, it makes sense to push forward when you're held against the seatbelt.
Logic of Automatic selector gate - Pete M
Gordon M
I always thought it was just a more natural movement under
likely prevailing acceleration.
When accelerating, it's a natural movement to pull back the lever
as you're pushed back in the car. Likewise, it makes sense
to push forward when you're held against the seatbelt.


Aircraft have throttle controls that are fully forward for maximum power and fully back for minimum power (or reverse thrust).
Up to around 1940, French and Italian aircraft had throttles that worked in the opposite sense. There is at least one known instance of an aircraft with a British pilot and French co-pilot having a tug-of-war on the throttles. Perhaps the French were applying the same logic as above.

Interestingly, a motorcycle throttle is rotated backwards (top towards the rider) to accelerate.
Logic of Automatic selector gate - machika
"The movement is mainly forward though."
But still very different to the movement of a tiptronic box
- try it if you don't believe me!


I have tried it, over a number of years now.
Logic of Automatic selector gate - Group B
Is it perhaps a hangover from early manual 3 speed gearboxes?


Probably just to keep the gear linkage simple, when automatics were first introduced?
Reverse L and up, 1st straight back, and 2nd and 3rd
across the gate, but I seem to recall that some
were the other way round then as well!


Different manual cars today still have reverse in different places, and different ways of selecting it. Early BMW M5's had a dog-leg first gearbox, like an old racing gearbox.
A mate of mine has a space-framed Landrover off road racer, which has a mid mounted Range Rover V8 and 5 speed manual gearbox. The engine and 'box are standard but mounted back to front, so the gear layout was rotated 180' from standard. First was at bottom right, second was straight forward, etc, with fifth at bottom left. But he has now bought a ball jointed converter thing which changes the gate pattern back to standard range rover.
I once drove an old site dumper with manual box and that was back to front too IIRC?

;o)
Logic of Automatic selector gate - Aprilia
You can usually change the direction of Tiptronic operation by swapping over the microswitches - I've done this in the past - you also have to swap over the '+' and '-' badges - which is more fiddly!.

Anyone remember the old British made AP auto transmission with as fitted to BL cars - they had a strange selector sequence.
Logic of Automatic selector gate - Happy Blue!
Yes - the Mini was PRN12D I think.
 

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