a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - tyro
Back in June, I replaced the brake pads on my Ford Ka with EBC uprated pads (as suggested in the CBCB) (see also www.honestjohn.co.uk/forum/post/index.htm?t=41866 )

Since then, it seems to me - though I have not done any testing under controlled conditions :-) so it may be my imagination - that braking has been significantly improved. It's not that it is now brilliant. It's just that it has been quite acceptable.

So - is fitting uprated brake pads a cheap, simple way to improve the safety of many ordinary cars?
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - jase1
Not really -- it's probably a combination of placebo effect and the fact that the new pads will always feel sharper than old ones.

Try braking hard from about 15mph: if you can get the wheels to skid, then the brakes are as good as they need to be (they've defeated the frictional effect of the tyres).
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - NARU
I would like to see the 60-0 times for new cars published with as much fanfare as the 0-60.

One of the reasons I often feel nervous about being tailgated by heavy 4x4s is having seen the autoexpress 60-0 tests they did a year or two ago.
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - jase1
Yeah very heavy cars struggle because of the momentum such a beast develops.

The worst car I've ever driven for bad brakes was a Peugeot 106 (1994). Even with new pads and discs the stopping power was frighteningly bad. From what I've seen this is a general probem with these cars.
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - Stuartli
>>The worst car I've ever driven for bad brakes >>

The worst, in my case, were seemingly all versions of the Fiat Regata. Either on or off, no progression whatsoever and a wing and a prayer whether you would stop as required.

Second worst was the old htch-shaped Polo without servo-assisted brakes.
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What\'s for you won\'t pass you by
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - v0n
One of the reasons I often feel nervous about being tailgated
by heavy 4x4s is having seen the autoexpress 60-0 tests they
did a year or two ago.


I don't know - both most popular new 4x4s - the new Range Rover and BMW X5 - are capable of stopping from 60 mph in a distance of less than 35m. Compare it to typical rep Mondeo stopping distance of almost 38 meters and it doesn't look half bad...
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[Nissan 2.2 dCi are NOT Renault engines. Grrr...]
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - Collos25
I would like to see the 60-0 times for new cars
published with as much fanfare as the 0-60.


They are on all German roadtests
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - tr7v8
EBC make dramatic differences to some cars & very little to others. The main reason I fit them to mine & any other car I work on is that they produce little brake dust & what their is is easier to clean off. They can also be gentler on discs causing much less disc wear.
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - Mr.Tee.43
I replaced the brake pads on my bike with EBC double H sintered brake pads and I can assure you that the
increased braking power after fitting was no placebo effect.

I don't think you can fit sintered pads to a car though.

And to those fellow bikers that will say, "yes but they will warp your disks ! "
I say ,I have had them on all my bikes and never had a problem.
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - DP
I also have EBC HH's on the ZZR and I'm well pleased with them. Never had a disc warping issue either.

My mate fitted EBC Greens to his ur Quattro and it made a heck of a difference, particularly with regard to initial bite and feel.

Cheers
DP
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - jase1
I can accept that these pads will make a car/bike's brakes *feel* better -- however as long as the standard brakes are capable of making the driven wheels lock, or the ABS cut in, then they have done their part of the job.

The fact that it takes a harder push to get them to that point is immaterial -- the lock point is as effective as the brakes can physically get.
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - Group B
The brakes on my Saab 9-3 used to be pretty poor; I had one or two instances braking from speed on downhill dual carriageways/ motorway sliproads where I didnt think it was going to stop... They didnt *feel* capable of locking the wheels and inspired no confidence.
I fitted Pagid fast road pads and Brembo high carbon discs (a combination recommended by other Saab owners), and the braking is very much improved. I know new brakes are going to feel better than old ones, but I still think they are better than the standard items, with better 'bite' and give more predictable stopping power. The bonus is they are actually a bit cheaper than Saab branded parts.

This is not the case for all cars though. My Dads Audi A4 has very sharp brakes (compared with mine) and IMO it would be unnecessary to fit uprated brakes for normal road use.
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - David Horn
Sintered pads will only warp a disc if you stop hard and hold the brakes on. I daresay the same thing would happen with organic pads.
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - mk124
I feel Jase1 has a good point. On virtually all modern cars most people can lock the brakes up, or call on the ABS to do it's job, even in dry conditions on good road. However uprated brakes may still be a good idea for the minority of the population (think of that 85 year old grannys), and thus must be considered useful. In older cars uprated brakes may be a good idea too. My 1996 clio surprised me when I first started driving it since the 1989 cavalier I had before had brakes you could lock up with less pedal pressure (or so I remember).
Another critical factor is how progressive the brakes on a car are. If brakes provide predictable response and do not fade, then fantastic. I have gone down big hills in my clio with a full car and have found myself standing on the brakes by the end of the hill.
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - jase1
The 85-year-old grannies are all driving around in Kias. I don't know how many of you have driven one of the newer Kia Rios or Picantos, but the brakes are stupidly over-assisted, in fact to the point where I don't like them very much. Touch the pedal and your head hits the steering wheel...

Brake fade is a good point though. I don't seem to have had any problems with my Nissan or Hyundai going down steep hills. I don't know if that has anything to do with technique (what I tend to do is select as low a gear as possible, and pulse the brakes the whole way down -- seems to work for the cars I have).
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - Sofa Spud
Re 4x4 braking distances: Even my old Land Rover 90, which was had the the front discs / rear drums set up rather than the all discs of the Defender, had excellent brakes. But then such vehicles are designed for towing heavy trailers so they need good brakes even with a trailer's over-run brakes .
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - cheddar
It is not just the power of the brakes on the wheel though also the tyres ability to grip the road, many 4x4 tyres are a compromise at best hence I find it difficult to believe VoNs figures above. Perhaps on a dry surface on road tyres an X5 or Range Rover can stop as well as a 3 Series or Mondeo (even though they are 50% heavier!) however on all terrain tyres on a wet motorway I would not want one tailgating me.
a cheap, simple way to make a car safer? - cheddar
>>I can accept that these pads will make a car/bike's brakes *feel* better -- however as long as the standard brakes are capable of making the driven wheels lock, or the ABS cut in, then they have done their part of the job.>>

This is a key point, to add to it - increasing the friction between the front discs and pads can create an imbalance if the rear is not also attended to.
 

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