Review: Mazda 2 (2007 – 2015)

Rating:

Enjoyable and fun to drive. Economical engines. Sensibly priced. Feels well built. Ride harshness over bumps improved for 2011.

Interior plastics aren't soft to touch. Side bump strips a dealer-fit option. rear seats don't fold flat.

Recently Added To This Review

30 October 2019

Significant Court Action Filed Against Mazda in Australia. AUSTRALIAN COMPETITION AND CONSUMER COMMISSION v MAZDA AUSTRALIA PTY LIMITED. "This proceeding concerns unconscionable conduct and false or... Read more

22 May 2019

Report of 2009 Mazda 2 TS2 needing a new a/c condenser radiator, air con pipe and further work on the air con condenser. More recently all four injectors have also had to be replaced. Read more

20 September 2018

Steering 'clunk' reported on 2011 Mazda 2 1.5 Sport. Thought to be the electric power steering motor. Read more

Mazda 2 (2007 – 2015): At A Glance

Alongside more recent rivals the Mazda2, introduced in 2007, is starting to show its age. The cabin layout looks outdated and the materials don’t feel particularly plush, while exterior styling no longer stands out as radical or dramatic. That said, there is still appeal thanks to fun driving dynamics and peppy engines.

Refinement isn’t impressive next to cars like the Ford Fiesta or Volkswagen Polo. A lot of engine noise makes it into the cabin even under normal driving conditions and road noise isn’t particularly well suppressed. The suspension could offer better ride quality, too – but they payoff is great handling in bends.

On a B-road the Mazda2 is excellent fun, with precise, well-weighted steering, a slick gear change and good body control. There’s plenty of feedback from the car, which inspires confidence. It’s not as good of an all-rounder as the Fiesta, but in terms of fun it does give the popular Ford a run for its money, along with the Suzuki Swift.

The Mazda2 has been offered with various different petrol and diesel engine options over its lifetime but the range is simpler now. There is a 1.3-litre petrol with either 75PS or 84PS, or a 1.5-litre petrol with 102PS paired to an automatic transmission. Emissions for both 1.3-litre variants are respectible, if not remarkable, at 115g/km, with official economy of 56.5mpg

Space inside isn’t bad, nor is it particularly impressive – adults will fit in the back and the boot is big enough for a shopping trip at 250 litres, but there are more practical options on sale including the Skoda Fabia or Honda Jazz, both of which have better cabin finish.

The Mazda2 is competitively priced and offers low running costs, but it is now out of date compared to its rivals. For someone who lives in a rural area and enjoys driving it could be the right choice if a good deal can be made, but for most there are better options on sale. 

Mazda 2 1.5 Activematic 2010 Road Test and Video

What does a Mazda 2 (2007 – 2015) cost?

List Price from £13,795
Buy new from £12,526
Contract hire from £148.80 per month
Get a finance quote with CarMoney

Mazda 2 (2007 – 2015): What's It Like Inside?

Dimensions
Length 3885–4415 mm
Width 1695–1755 mm
Height 1465–1475 mm
Wheelbase 2490–2640 mm

Full specifications

Inside the cabin, the Mazda2 is starting to show its age. The hard, drab looking plastics and dull layout aren’t very appealing, while the leather steering wheel trim feels thin and the seats could offer more support. There’s enough room for adults in the back row, but it’s far from the most spacious small hatchback and the boot is small, with a capacity of 250 litres.

There are some good points though. The plastics may not be soft-touch, but they are certainly hard wearing and should withstand plenty of abuse. There are plenty of places to store odds and ends like change, plus a decent sized glove compartment with a handy pouch for storing documents or the car’s manual.

The dashboard layout is simple but effective – the dials are clear and easy to read while the ventilation and audio controls are intuitive and easy to get to grips with. Upper trim levels get a navigation system which is fine, but it’s not quite as user-friendly as, for example, the system in a Volkswagen.

All models get air conditioning, electric windows, a USB socket and aux-in, while upper trim levels get better audio, a nav system and climate control. The Mazda2 misses out on more recent safety technology like collision mitigating brakes and.

Standard Equipment:

SE Air Con models come with air conditioning, front electric windows, manual air conditioning, height adjustable driver’s seat, one-piece folding rear bench, two-speaker audio system with USB/Aux in.

Tamura models gain four-speaker audio and steering wheel audio controls, leather steering wheel and gear knob.

Sport Venture models gain climate control, navigation, rear vents.

Child seats that fit a Mazda 2 (2007 – 2015)

Our unique Car Seat Chooser shows you which child car seats will fit this car and which seat positions that they will fit, so that you don't have to check every car seat manufacturer's website for compatibility.

Which car seat will suit you?

What's the Mazda 2 (2007 – 2015) like to drive?

The Mazda2 is among the best small hatchbacks around when it comes to fun driving dynamics. Along with the Suzuki Swift and Ford Fiesta it’s great to drive on a tight, twisting road, where its accurate steering, high levels of grip and good body control matter more than outright power and performance.

That’s good news because the Mazda2 is only available with two engines – a 1.3-litre petrol – with outputs of 75PS, 84PS or, if you pick an automatic transmission, you get a 1.5-litre engine with 102PS. None of these offers blistering performance, with even the swiftest 84PS manual model taking 13.9 seconds to reach 60mph. It’s not the most refined engine, making quite a lot of noise under acceleration.

Thankfully the little 1.3-litre petrol is perfectly likeable on the road – power delivery and gear change action are both smooth. Performance from a standstill might be lacklustre but on the move the Mazda2 feels capable enough, especially around town and on A- or B-roads. At a 70mph motorway cruise things get a bit loud, but there’s enough power in reserve for overtaking.

Emissions and economy lag behind rivals – the 1.3-litre petrol emits 115g/km and has economy of 56.5mph  regardless of power output, whereas rivals often come in at below 100g/km. Previously the Mazda2 was available with a pair of diesel options – a 1.6-litre and a 1.4-litre. These were more frugal, with economy of more than 60mpg, but still produced more CO2 than rivals and consequently they have been cancelled.

Engine MPG 0-62 CO2
1.3 54–57 mpg 11.9–14.9 s 115–125 g/km
1.3 Automatic 45 mpg 11.9 s 145 g/km
1.4 42 mpg 14.5 s 157 g/km
1.4 D 66–69 mpg 14.5–15.5 s 107–114 g/km
1.5 50 mpg 9.4–10.7 s 132–135 g/km
1.5 Automatic 45 mpg 11.9 s 145 g/km
1.6 D 67 mpg 10.4–11.5 s 110–112 g/km

Real MPG average for a Mazda 2 (2007 – 2015)

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

80%

Real MPG

26–67 mpg

MPGs submitted

500

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

What have we been asked about the Mazda 2 (2007 – 2015)?

Every day we're asked hundreds of questions from car buyers and owners through Ask Honest John. Our team of experts, including the nation's favourite motoring agony uncle - Honest John himself - answer queries and conudrums ranging from what car to buy to how to care for it as an owner. If you could do with a spot of friendly advice before buying you're next car, get in touch and we'll do what we can to help.

Ask HJ

Am I wasting my money using super unleaded fuel?

I have three cars - 2011 Mazda MX5 Roadster 2.0-litre, 2011 Mazda 2 TS2 1.35-litre and 2016 Skoda Yeti 1.2 TSI SEL. I am using Shell V-POWER U/L in all of these. Is this okay or am I wasting my money?
Very okay. You will be getting better performance: more torque at low rpm and will be keeping your fuel systems and valves clean. Stay with it.
Answered by Honest John
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