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Nearly-new car prices slashed as demand for diesel drops

Published 05 June 2019

Dealers are slashing tens of thousands of pounds off pre-registered cars as demand drops around on-going uncertainty over the future of diesels.

Industry figures reveal that the number of new diesel cars registered in the UK during May fell by more than 18 per cent compared to the same period last year - down from 62,281 diesels registered in May 2018 to 50,900 during the same month in 2019.

>> See the latest pre-reg and nearly-new car deals

However, according to analysis by HonestJohn.co.uk, dealers are pre-registering thousands of vehicles in a bid to force the market and reverse the so-called diesel slump. This means that diesel car buyers are in a strong position to save money on as-new vehicles.

The Nissan Qashqai was the sixth most popular car in May 2019 according to figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT), yet our research reveals dealers selling pre-registered diesel examples from as little as £15,800.

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There are similar deals to be had on the smaller Nissan Juke. Dealers are cutting more than £8500 off Bose special edition models with the diesel engine - meaning they can be had for less than £12,500.

Some of the biggest savings are to be had on premium models, with one dealer slashing nearly £15,000 off a diesel C-Class estate.

Britain's second-best-selling car, the Ford Focus, is available from £15,000, while there are some sizable discounts for the Volkswagen Polo diesel.

There are some excellent deals to be had on diesel examples of the universally popular Volkswagen Golf, too. We found nearly £5500 off this Volkswagen Golf 1.6 TDI SE, while dealers are slashing thousands off the performance GTD model.

Even relatively new models, like the Mercedes-Benz A-Class, aren't exempt from hefty discounts - we found the A180D SE advertised from £20,450, down from its £26,030 list price.

*All prices correct at time of writing and based on live adverts found at Honest John Cars For Sale

Comments

Engineer Andy    on 5 June 2019

As for previous months figures, wouldn't this be as much, if not more to do with the impending change to the WLTP emissions tests, whereby manufacturers were desperately trying to offload stock that they knew wouldn't pass the more stringent test or at least give results far higher for the emissions and far lower for the mpg, and thus last years's sales figures were artificially high?

Not only that, but that the figures for June, July and August will be even worse as the date draws nearer to the cut-off date last year of 1st September when the test changed?

mmmmm    on 5 June 2019

As for previous months figures, wouldn't this be as much, if not more to do with the impending change to the WLTP emissions tests, whereby manufacturers were desperately trying to offload stock that they knew wouldn't pass the more stringent test or at least give results far higher for the emissions and far lower for the mpg, and thus last years's sales figures were artificially high? Not only that, but that the figures for June, July and August will be even worse as the date draws nearer to the cut-off date last year of 1st September when the test changed?

Do you work for Amazon?.

Engineer Andy    on 6 June 2019

As for previous months figures, wouldn't this be as much, if not more to do with the impending change to the WLTP emissions tests, whereby manufacturers were desperately trying to offload stock that they knew wouldn't pass the more stringent test or at least give results far higher for the emissions and far lower for the mpg, and thus last years's sales figures were artificially high? Not only that, but that the figures for June, July and August will be even worse as the date draws nearer to the cut-off date last year of 1st September when the test changed?

Do you work for Amazon?.

Que? Not sure what your question has to do my comment. But in answer, no, I don't.

mmmmm    on 5 June 2019

.

Edited by mmmmm on 05/06/2019 at 22:09

retired surveyor    on 6 June 2019

Diesels are bad so is sugar now. Diesels give more N20 that kills people but less C02, so they kill people. Petrol produces more C02 less N02. C02 is on the increase over the planet. Therefore petrol kills the planet and the people on it in the end. It would not be too bad if the Government would take it more seriously and start putting in an electric car infrastructure in and there was an electric car with a range of 400 miles plus at a reasonable price. My diesel car does 45 to the gall the same petrol does 25. No brainer then. The Government would do better to follow Norway's example, buy electric and get a tax incessive and they have an electric car infrastructure.

Phil McMillan    on 6 June 2019

Unless you are a total road warrior, and do 400 mile plus journeys without stopping for food or comfort breaks, then such a large battery is a waste of resource. A fuel tank is an empty space and costs nothing in real terms to increase capacity from 200 miles to 400 miles.

A battery on the other hand has components which have an environmental impact in manufacture. For a moderate size battery, this is offset by the long term emissions savings an EV offers, even in countries heavily dependant of fossil fuel for electricity.

Once you build a very large battery (>125 KWh) that you would need for 400 miles plus, then the environment impact is large. Given that most people drive under 250 miles per day (around 45 miles per day is the average), the extra weight would also lower the efficiency of the vehicle.

For most people, a car that offers 250 miles on a single charge is adequate. For a long journey, taking a break every 3 to 4 hours for 30 to 45 minutes would be sufficient for rapid charging to reach anywhere is the UK.

I do believe that the future is electric, but the demonisation of diesel is unnecessary. The main problem in older diesels, small particulate matter, has been significantly reduced by modern diesel technology (DPFs / AdBlue / etc). You are correct that CO2 kills the planet, and N02 kills people. With the current UK electricity generation mix, moving to EV makes a lot of sense. The incentives I would like to see are;

- All new houses to have EV chargers installed as standard.

- The OLEV grants for home chargers to be expanded, and offer the option of an interest free loan to those who currently do not own an EV, but would like to have the infrastructure for friends and family (or for each electric car owner to be able to install additional chargers at other locations for a discount)

- OLEV grant of EVs to be increased and include an element for efficiency (i.e. Cars like the Kia eNiro to have a greater grant that cars that are less efficient, such as Jaguar I-Pace). This will help ensure that we look after the resources on the grid more effectively.

- Subsidisation of the installation of more 100 Kw+ capable rapid chargers in service stations, town centres and shopping centres.

- For those that own an EV and home charger, to be offered additional grants to install solar panels and home battery storage.

- Businesses to receive a reduction in their corporate taxes should they either install chargers for their employees / customers or provide electric company cars.

- Other incentives such as scrappage of old petrol / diesel cars during the purchase of electric cars. As a significant amount of resources go into manufacturing cars, safeguards need to be in place to prevent newer cars going to scrap. a minimum age of 12 years or minimum mileage of 150,000 would be sensible.

Although the cost of these incentives will be high, the savings to the NHS in the long term together with the reduction in emissions would be worthwhile.

Engineer Andy    on 7 June 2019

Phil - so what about us that live in flats and on non-adopted roads, which means WE will have to pay a small fortune to upgrade our local electrical supplies, dig up the roads and paths and install very expensive, highly secure/robust stand-alone charging points away from buildings, assuming we have sufficient space (quite likely we don't).

Many flat blocks' and office car parks just don't have the space for EV charging stations, primarily because they don't have enough space to accommodate everyone's car. I can also forsee visitors or other residents/workers stealing others' spaces in order to charge their cars in a 'German's towel on the sun-lounger' routine. If you can't charge your car up and cannot hang around for 45 mins (never mind the waiting time) at a charging station, what do you do?

It's not as easy as subsidising everything - I mean, where's the money for all this going to come from? Are you going to suddenly be ok with your taxes going up sharply to (for the moment) subsidise people running £30k+ cars, including many that cost far more than that, whilst people running 2nd hand ICE cars on a shoestring can barely afford to keep them on the road? The rich won't be able to subsidise this all because there's just not enough of them to do so, and they'll just move abroad as they did the last time they were 'soaked' for money.

This needs to be VERY long term and done gradually, not suddenly, so it can be planned correctly for everyone, not just those that have the means to take advantage of it.

Ben Farrington    on 7 June 2019

"You are correct that CO2 kills the planet", absolute rubbish, carbon dioxide is actually the “gas of life,” without which life on earth would perish. “Eliminate CO2, and plants would shrivel and die. So would lake and ocean algae or phytoplankton, grasses, kelp and other water plants. After that, animal and human life would disappear. Even reducing carbon dioxide levels too much – sending it back to pre-industrial levels, for example – would have terrible consequences for crops, other plants, animals and humans.”

“Carbon dioxide performs as many miracles for our planet as antibiotics and immunizations have for mankind. That is an amazing feat for a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that represents just 0.04 percent of our atmosphere: the equivalent of just 40 cents out of $1,000 or 1.4 inches on a football field!”

Petegeoff    on 6 June 2019

Diesels are bad so is sugar now. Diesels give more N20 that kills people but less C02, so they kill people. Petrol produces more C02 less N02. C02 is on the increase over the planet. Therefore petrol kills the planet and the people on it in the end. It would not be too bad if the Government would take it more seriously and start putting in an electric car infrastructure in and there was an electric car with a range of 400 miles plus at a reasonable price. My diesel car does 45 to the gall the same petrol does 25. No brainer then. The Government would do better to follow Norway's example, buy electric and get a tax incessive and they have an electric car infrastructure.

Can't really compare a tiny but very rich country like Norway to the UK. How many cars are there in Norway? Not many compared to us. Of course, not many people either. And where did much of their wealth come from? OIL! Hypocrites!

NickNike    on 11 June 2019

Norway uses hydroelectric power stations. They sell all their gas to us. So there is zero pollution. Most our electrical generation is fossil fuels, so producing the electrical power for cars still produces significant pollution. To think electric cars are clean is a nonsense. CO2 is non toxic and required for plant life. The levels in the air are actually low, and global warming is a myth. You diesel may travel further on a gallon,l but the petrol car will have better performance, be smoother and quieter and more fun to drive.

There's too much politics involved in all this subject, and not enough engineering logic.

pint6x    on 6 June 2019

Wouldn't touch cheap C class Merc, most unreliable premium exec car by some stretch. Now the E class is a different story.

MarcusVia    on 6 June 2019

Engineer Andy has got it spot on. I'm looking at company car lease deals and they're practically giving the V90's, S90's away. With emissions figures up from 119g/km to 127, taking the taxable BIK rates up from 27%+4% surcharge to 29%+4% plus the huge increase in list prices taking many of the "mid-range" V90 into the so-called "luxury" £40k tax limit and you can see why.
Diesel is unviable as a company car now at the so-called "executive" level approaching the 40k list price. Hybrid the only option other than opting-out completely.
It's even worse for private buyers with completely meaningless list prices (40k Passat GTE new, £22k after a year or so) mean who in their right mind would buy brand new? Or buy at all? You can see why the industry is grinding to a halt.

   on 6 June 2019

We should keep diesels as part of the overall energy 'mix' for the future. After all, it is possible to produce bio-diesel either directly from plants or other plant based waste products such as cooking oil. Don't think you can make bio-petrol. If we demonise diesels now, there is no incentive to develop the engine technology further. We have already come a long way with Euro 6 engines including Ad-blue to solve the nitrous dioxide problem and DPFs for the particulates. The ultimate solution in my view is not battery powered cars which only move the pollution elsewhere but hydrogen powered vehicles. We have an unlimited supply of hydrogen as part of water (H2o) plus the only bi-product of a hydrogen fuel cell is water! Simples!

soldierboy 001    on 6 June 2019

The amount of pollution being moved elsewhere is a lot less than the amount of pollution being made today, so less is good. My problem is the range that you can get and the refuel time, so for me hydrogen is the answer, and you can make this at home. Bit like home brew for cars.

Paul Franklin    on 7 June 2019

To expand upon this last, well-crafted post:
Moving the pollution from town centres to power stations is advisable/ admirable, but the overall pollution levels actually rise due to inefficiencies in generation.
The grid has recently managed to run for short periods "without coal", but the power stations did not shut down, they went to tick-over and some of the coal output was stored or shared with other countries.

Electric vehicles, despite the pro-lobby crowing how green they are "over their lifespan" are still very heavy resource consumers and polluters during manufacture - it will take decades before they are truly squeaky clean and green overall.

The building of sufficient infrastructure to make EVs even partly practical will take several years and cost billions (the Govt has set aside just 10 million . . . .), and for what?

You can google and confirm all of the above.

For me, in my Euro 6 diesel, the way forward is clear - IF THE GOVERNMENT GETS ITS FINGER OUT!
I will keep driving my clean diesel, doing plenty of MPG, with as low as any petrol vehicle in particulates and way less CO2.
Then, once Hydrogen distribution is in place, I will buy a Hydrogen vehicle.
Emissions kept within close limits, until I can drive a vehicle with water as its only emission!!

How can we influence the market to move that way soon?
The 'Electric Lobby' has masses of marketing budget.

c Reed    on 6 June 2019

Diesel fuel will be produced by the refineries no matter what.

It is a part of the crarking process that splits the different hydrocarbon in crude oil into the many products that keep the world spinning around.

Quite where this unused diesel will be used has not been explained.

Probably generating electricity for your E-car.

AS there will not be e-lorries anytime soon, perhaps the media could get its act together. A few night school classes might help. There is always a pub nearby when classes finish

Tarquin    on 6 June 2019

Ev is clearly the must for cities and the catchment areas. Rural us slightly more problematic. I think the approach should be change the fuel not the car. As suggested diesel engines should not be completely ruled out as they have many plus points. If we can change the type of diesel fuel to a plant based one then we are onto a winner. Petrol is being heralded as the most viable interim but maybe it is not after all it is still a huge polluter.

   on 6 June 2019


Diesel gives more MPG......BUT because 10 gallons of diesel weighs approx 90lbs

10 gallons of petrol weighs approx 70lbs

so you get more fuel for your money,

when you burn this fuel you get approximately the same volume of CO2 but diesel

has a dirtier burn producing fine particulates and because of the much higher

compression ratios needed to get a diesel to run it will produce oxides of nitrogen.

at present there does not seem to be an alternative to diesel for heavy road

transport and marine use.

Modern petrol cars are much cleaner, little in the way of particulates and with the

catalytic converter unburnt fuel and carbon monoxide emissions are reduced to

very low levels

Electric cars are an attractive alternative for people who are lucky enough to live

in a house with a parking space attached but not a practical choice if you live in a

flat or high density housing

   on 6 June 2019


Diesel gives more MPG......BUT because 10 gallons of diesel weighs approx 90lbs

10 gallons of petrol weighs approx 70lbs

so you get more fuel for your money,

when you burn this fuel you get approximately the same volume of CO2 but diesel

has a dirtier burn producing fine particulates and because of the much higher

compression ratios needed to get a diesel to run it will produce oxides of nitrogen.

at present there does not seem to be an alternative to diesel for heavy road

transport and marine use.

Modern petrol cars are much cleaner, little in the way of particulates and with the

catalytic converter unburnt fuel and carbon monoxide emissions are reduced to

very low levels

Electric cars are an attractive alternative for people who are lucky enough to live

in a house with a parking space attached but not a practical choice if you live in a

flat or high density housing

C A Nicholson    on 6 June 2019

Older diesels are still a good buy if you don't go to the cities that charge, I bought a new small diesel and going by WeBuyAnyCar.com I have only lost £6K in 8 years to sell my low mileage VGC MPV. I am very happy as I budgeted £1K loss in value a year over 10 years leaving mw with the car costing under £500. Very ceap tax, insurance and service costs, gives me 40mpg local runs.

Andy Lane    on 9 June 2019

We may have as little as 10 years to achieve a carbon free world. Unlikely to happen. Remember don't mess with nature. She always bats last...

Martd    on 10 June 2019

Perhaps diesel owners are getting fed up with trouble and expense with DPF's and whatever other complicated technology is being loaded on to these vehicles. Unfortunately, if they are fleeing to petrol engine transport, these are now being fitted with petrol particulate filters, so there is no escape for the low-mileage driver. Probably part of a plot to get us into ev's, when hydrogen is clearly the technology of the future. In this country at least, there will simply not be enough reliable electricity to go round when everyone has ev's (a comment from HJ himself). Several countries, including China and Germany, are still building coal-fired power stations ! The good old virtue-signalling UK has meekly blown most of its own up.

Buddyduke    on 10 June 2019

Did you know diesel which is EAT6 automatic which I have got is cleaner than the new petrol engines coming out, I am now waiting for my new diesel car which is EAT8 automatic which is alot cleaner again.

A lot of people are getting sucked in because of the government saying diesel is bad.

Also think back your grandparents mine lives till in their 80's and 90's working in the ship yards, on the roads etc breathing in the petrol and diesel fumes never had any problems

Murray Snudge    on 10 June 2019

My 1991 Ford Escort diesel returns 60mpg and I'm keeping it.

Margaret Sullivan    on 24 June 2019

Diesel is much more economical than petrol. My previous cars were all petrol, cheap tax on them but when for obvious reasons, I decided to get a bigger car the price of road tax went through the roof. I now have diesel and would never change.
As for pollution what about all the s*** dumped from aircrafts, while flying overhead?
As for electric cars, no thanks. Who wants to wait hours at a charge point for their car to charge, especially if people have appointments, doctors, hospitals etc?
What about lorries, buses etc changing to e type, don't think so?

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