Review: Suzuki Celerio (2015 – 2019)

Rating:

Cheap to buy. Low running costs. Good level of standard equipment. Spacious cabin and boot. Comfortable and easy to drive. Brake problem resolved.

Coarse engines and poor refinement. Interior feels dated and cheap. Imports suspended in August 2019.

Recently Added To This Review

4 February 2017

Be aware that the Suzuki recommended oil for the Celerio is a very light 0w-20 grade. Read more

1 October 2015

'City' trim introduced. City has as extras over the base model SZ2 of alloy wheels, rear parking sensors, black side mouldings, black B pillar trims and City edition badge. Read more

1 July 2015 Entry-level SZ2 model introduced

Suzuki has now introduced a new SZ2 derivative priced at just £6,999 that now completes a five model line up in the range consisting of SZ2, SZ3, SZ3 Dualjet, SZ4 and SZ4 with Auto Gear Shift (AGS).... Read more

Suzuki Celerio (2015 – 2019): At A Glance

On the face of it there's very little to say about the Suzuki Celerio. It is ordinary to look at and its price tag doesn't grab headlines like the bargain Dacia Sandero. But delve a little deeper and you will start to find the appeal, because this little car comes with everything most drivers need. 

Standard equipment on the base model includes a CD player with DAB radio, Bluetooth and a USB port, along with alloy wheels, electric windows and even air conditioning. There is space in the back for two adults and an impressive boot for such a small car. 

The main engine is a 1.0-litre petrol with 68PS and 90Nm of torque. It has official economy of 65.7mpg and emits 99g/km of CO2 and so qualifies for free car tax. This will be joined by a revised Dualjet engine from April 2015, which has the same power figures but with improved economy of 78.4mpg and even lower emissions of 84g/km. 

It might be a bargain, but the Celerio certainly has its flaws - the engine is coarse when driven hard and there is a noticeable amount of wind noise at motorway speeds. It is easy to see where costs have been cut inside - the dashboard, indicator stalks and air conditioning controls feel dated and less durable than they do in other Suzuki models like the Swift. 

Having said that, the major controls are feather light and road manners are good - there's plenty of grip and ride quality is good. Factor in the generous standard gear and it's easy to make a case for the Celerio. It might not be a class leader, but for those who want nonsense-free motoring at a good price it could be just the ticket.

What does a Suzuki Celerio (2015 – 2019) cost?

List Price from £8,004
Buy new from £7,459
Contract hire from £149.08 per month
Get a finance quote with CarMoney

Suzuki Celerio (2015 – 2019): What's It Like Inside?

Dimensions
Length 3600 mm
Width 1600 mm
Height 1530–1540 mm
Wheelbase 2425 mm

Full specifications

The Celerio has a good level of standard equipment for such an inexpensive car, plus it offers more interior space than you would expect. However it's easy to see where the costs have been cut, with cheap switches, flimsy plastic door coverings and a dashboard less durable than is typical of Suzuki models. You can tell this is a car built to a budget. 

But if you can look past the flaws there is plenty left to like. All cars come with air conditioning, alloy wheels, Bluetooth and USB connectivity, so you're left wanting for very little. The boot is 254 litres, which is slightly larger than you get in rival cars like the Skoda Citigo. It's a flatter and longer too, so is a more useful shape.

The five-door only bodystyle means access to the back row of seats is good and they offer plenty of leg and headroom, even for adults. Children will be at home too, thanks to Isofix child seat mounts and a full three-point seatbelt in the middle - though shoulder room will be limited for whoever draws the short straw and ends up sitting there. 

The trim structure is very simple. The entry-grade SZ3 model gets more or less everything you need, but you can spend a little more and get some cosmetic embellishments and some extra luxuries with top SZ4 trim. Our advice is to stick to the entry-level car though. It's simple, honest transport with all the essentials covered.  

Standard Equipment

SZ3 models come with a tyre pressure monitor, remote central locking, electric front windows, rev counter, gear shift indicator, 12v socket, manual air conditioning, USB connection, DAB radio with two speakers, Bluetooth and 14-inch alloy wheels.

SZ4 trim adds polished alloy wheels, four-speaker audio, body-coloured door mirrors, chrome grille trim, front fog lights, electrically adjusted door mirrors and rear electric windows.

Child seats that fit a Suzuki Celerio (2015 – 2019)

Our unique Car Seat Chooser shows you which child car seats will fit this car and which seat positions that they will fit, so that you don't have to check every car seat manufacturer's website for compatibility.

Which car seat will suit you?

What's the Suzuki Celerio (2015 – 2019) like to drive?

All Celerio models get a 1.0-litre three cylinder petrol engine with 68PS. Initially this chain-cam engine has emissions of 99g/km and official economy of 65.7mpg, but from April 2015 the figures improve to 84g/km and 78.4mpg thanks to a new DualJet version, which will be offered alongside the current engine.

It might not be powerful, but the engine is peppy enough for town work or accelerating up to motorway speeds. The smooth, light clutch and gear lever make the Celerio effortlessly easy to drive, but the engine does make a fair amount of noise when pushed hard.

Thankfully the handling and ride quality are good. The suspension is compliant and comfortable over most surfaces but sunken manhole covers or potholes do intrude rather noisily into the cabin. On the plus side the handling is safe and predictable, with more than enough grip from the front wheels.

On motorways the Celerio works, but it certainly isn’t at home. Speed isn’t the issue – a down change frees up enough power to overtake trucks – but the wind and engine noise get tiresome quickly. A short dual carriageway trip won’t be a problem, but long distance journeys at high speed really aren’t its forte.

As you would expect it is much more at home in town, where the light steering, easy gear change action and small size come into their own, making it easy to park. It is happy on B-roads too, with enough pep to keep up with a 60mph limit – it’s only above that speed that things get loud.

For those who need an automatic transmission there is an automated manual, which offers the same emissions and economy as the standard manual. It is a little cumbersome compared to a traditional automatic, however – so is better avoided unless you really need it. 

Engine MPG 0-62 CO2
1.0 66 mpg 13.5 s 99 g/km
1.0 Automatic 66 mpg 16.4 s 99 g/km
1.0 Dualjet 72–78 mpg 13.0–13.5 s 84–99 g/km

Real MPG average for a Suzuki Celerio (2015 – 2019)

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

95%

Real MPG

50–80 mpg

MPGs submitted

144

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

What have we been asked about the Suzuki Celerio (2015 – 2019)?

Every day we're asked hundreds of questions from car buyers and owners through Ask Honest John. Our team of experts, including the nation's favourite motoring agony uncle - Honest John himself - answer queries and conudrums ranging from what car to buy to how to care for it as an owner. If you could do with a spot of friendly advice before buying you're next car, get in touch and we'll do what we can to help.

Ask HJ

Which cars would you recommend for young drivers?

Which cars would you recommend for young drivers?
Low powered ones like the Vauxhall Viva, Ford Ka+, Suzuki Celerio, Kia Picanto, Hyundai i10, Volkswagen Up, SEAT Mii, Skoda Citigo, Toyota Aygo, Citroen C1, Peugeot 108 - all 1.0-litre except for the Ka+ which is 1.2.
Answered by Honest John
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