Renault Clio (2001 – 2007) Review

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Renault Clio (2001 – 2007) At A Glance

3/5

+Well-equipped, good-looking hatch with a 'big car' feel. 172 grown to 182 and another cracking hot hatch. 4 Star NCAP crash safety rating.

-Build quality niggles. Reports of ignition coil and auto gearbox failures.

Looking for a Renault Clio (2001 - 2007)?
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Child seats that fit a Renault Clio (2001 – 2007)

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Satisfaction Index

Satisfaction Index What is your car like to live with?

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Ask Honest John

Does an electric city car suit our needs?
"My wife's current car is a 2003 Renault Clio from new (probably the most reliable car we've had). She normally does about four short journeys a week and an occasional 35-mile return journey. Sometime, the Clio will give up. Would it be best for her to get a new electric car for those journeys? Would it be best to get one now or wait till the Clio gives up? Is the new Skoda Citigo-e the best and most economical for her? Any other advice, please?"
An electric car certainly sounds like it'd suit your wife's needs well, assuming she can charge a car at home (i.e. you have access to private parking close to an electricity supply). It'll be easy to drive with very low running costs. The Skoda Citigo-e iV is probably the best value little electric car on sale at the moment (along with the very similar SEAT Mii Electric and Volkswagen e-Up). Your wife's Clio is probably worth very little at the moment, unfortunately, so it might be worth hanging onto it until something goes wrong. That said, replacing it now might give you (and your wife) some peace of mind rather than running an older car until it breaks.
Answered by Andrew Brady
What small used car should I buy on a £600 budget?
"I just had to get rid of my 2003 Volkswagen Polo due to engine problems. I'm looking to buy a used car, but I’m limited money to £600. I want something mainly just for school runs and shopping. I only passed test five month ago so need something cheap on insurance. I've been looking at 03-plate Nissan Micra, Peugeot 206, Renault Clio and Ford Fiesta. Anything small and nippy, mainly for short trips and around town. Any suggestions?"
With a small budget, I'd be looking for a Ford Fiesta, Nissan Micra or Toyota Yaris - all are tough little cars and there are plenty around. Don't concentrate too much on a specific model, though. You'd be better buying whatever's available in good condition with a long MoT. And avoid dealers, they'll be selling scrap at this money. Just make sure whatever you buy has a proper service history so you don't end up getting a car that will soon have its fair share of issues crop up.
Answered by Andrew Brady
What should I look out for when buying a used car?
"How much should I pay for 2001 Renault Clio? What should I look out for?"
The value will depend on the mileage, condition, how well it's been looked after, whether it comes with an MoT etc. I would pay somewhere between £250 and £800, with the higher end of that pay scale reserved for a Clio in good nick that has low mileage for it's age, comes with an Mot, doesn't look like it's on it's last legs... What you don't want is the false economy of paying pennies for a car, and then almost immediately having to pay for new components. You probably know to look for things like the condition of the tyres, rust, unusual engine noise (make sure you rev it), responsive brakes, steering (make sure the car doesn't pull in one direction, could be a sign the tyre alignment is out), gears (make sure these change easily) and the service history. But it's also a good idea to check the spare tyre (and make sure the locking wheel nut is there too), the air conditioning/heating, all lights, windows and signals, and the locks. Make sure you get the V5C registration document, you won't be able to tax the car without it, as well as all the keys. Check the paint and bodywork for signs of damage, it may have been in an accident if the paint looks uneven or there are strange gaps between the panels. Obviously an 17-year-old car will have wear and tear, but make sure you know exactly what you're buying. Check the recorded mileage on the service records and MoT certificates, make sure it's consistent with the current mileage/condition of the car. Also check the MoT status and history online: https://www.gov.uk/check-mot-status
Answered by Georgia Petrie
The value of my car on my insurance policy is £550, would I get this much if it was written off?
"My car is a 2003 Renault Clio 1.2. I bought it new from the original owner in 2012 with 60,000 miles and full main dealer service history. It now has 110,000 miles, a new MoT and has been serviced yearly by a local garage. I just renewed the insurance too. However, the value of my car on the policy was stated as £150. Recently, my neighbour was paid £100 for a scrapper with no MoT. I queried this and was asked to provide adverts online showing how much a replacement would cost. The insurer has amended the value to £550, which was the lowest advert and lacks 12 months MoT and service history. I had to accept the policy as time had ran out on the old one. My question is how much would I get in the event of a write off? A replacement that is truly like-for-like from a dealer advert online is around £900."
The value on the policy has no bearing whatsoever to the market value of the vehicle unless the policy is an agreed market value policy. Any advert you see is an asking price rather than a selling price, and isn't indicative of the true market value generally. The approximate value based the car being immaculate is £500-700. There are thousands of them out there for sale, and many with less miles for this figure.
Answered by Tim Kelly

What does a Renault Clio (2001 – 2007) cost?