Porsche 911 (2019–)

Model History

January 2019

Porsche 911 Cabriolet revealed

Six weeks after the Coupe launch, attention now turns to the Porsche 911 Cabriolet.

Porsche says the new model echoes the timeless and contemporary design of the Coupe, remaining unmistakably a Porsche 911 in Cabriolet form. The fully-automatic soft top has an integrated glass rear window and the roof structure contains magnesium surface elements, known as ‘bows’, which reliably prevent ballooning of the roof at high speeds. The top can be opened or closed at speeds up to 30mph; and new roof hydraulics reduce opening time to around twelve seconds – quicker than ever - while an electrically extendable wind deflector ensures high comfort for the driver and passenger.

The 911 Cabriolet is initially available as a Carrera S with rear-wheel drive and Carrera 4S with all-wheel drive. Both use the flat-six, 2981cc, twin-turbocharged ‘boxer’ engine producing 450PS at 6500rpm and 530Nm torque between 2300 and 5000 rpm. The drive efficiency has been increased and emissions reduced by way of an improved fuel injection process; other optimisation measures have also been implemented, such as a new layout for the turbochargers and charge air cooling system. The power is delivered by a newly-developed eight-speed PDK dual-clutch transmission.

The Carrera S accelerates from zero to 62mph in 3.9 seconds (with optional Sport Chrono Package: 3.7 seconds) and, where permitted, can reach speeds up to 190mph. The Carrera 4S attains a top speed of 188mph and achieves 0-62mph in 3.8 seconds (with optional Sport Chrono Package: 3.6 seconds). The fuel consumption (NEDC-correlated) of the 911 Carrera S Cabriolet is 31mpg (208g/km CO2 equivalent) and for the Carrera 4S Cabriolet is 31.3 mpg (207g/km CO2 equivalent).

The new mounting position for the flat-six engine makes the Cabriolet more rigid torsionally than its predecessor. For the first time, the sport chassis configuration with Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) is available for the 911 Cabriolet. The springs are shorter and stiffer, the front and rear anti-roll-bars toughened, and the ride height overall has been lowered by ten millimetres. These adjustments give the 911 a more neutral feel on the road, with better weight distribution.

The new 911 Cabriolet looks wider, more self-assured and altogether more muscular than its predecessor, says the manufacturer. Wider arches envelope the large 20-inch diameter wheels at the front and 21-inch diameter wheels at the rear. The rear-wheel-drive models now match the bodywork width of the existing all-wheel drive versions, being broader by 44mm. The nose – generally 45mm wider across the front axle – revives a traditional feature from earlier 911 generations: a forward-extended bonnet with a distinctive recess in front of the windscreen. Both elements lengthen the front of the car and lend further dynamic purpose.

The rear of all models is dominated by the significantly wider, variable-position aerodynamic spoiler and the seamless, elegant light bar. With the exception of the front and rear sections, the entire outer skin is now made from aluminium.

The interior is distinctive, with clear, straight lines and recessed instruments defining the dashboard. As it does in the original 911, the new dashboard covers the entire width between two horizontal wing levels. Alongside the centrally positioned rev counter, two thin, frameless freeform displays deliver information to the driver. Now 10.9 inches in size, the centre screen of the Porsche Communication Management (PCM) can be operated quickly and without causing distraction.

In a world first, Porsche has developed Wet Mode, which is included as standard. This function detects water on the road, preconditions the control systems accordingly and warns the driver, who can then set the car up to focus on safety, by simply pushing a button or using the mode switch on the steering wheel (in combination with Sport Chrono Package). The camera-based warning and brake assist system, also fitted as standard, detects the risk of collision with vehicles, pedestrians, and cyclists, and initiates a warning or emergency braking procedure if necessary. A park assistant system including reversing camera completes the standard configuration of the Cabriolet. Options for the 911 include Night Vision Assist with thermal imaging camera, as well as adaptive cruise control with automatic distance control, stop-and-go function and reversible occupant protection.

The new models are available to order from Porsche Centres in the UK and Ireland from today. The 911 Carrera S Cabriolet is priced from £102,755 and the 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet from £108,063.

July 2019

Porsche reveals new 911 Carrera Coupe and 911 Carrera Cabriolet

Porsche is expanding its eighth-generation of the 911 range with the announcement of the new Carrera models.

This expansion to the line-up of the iconic sports car includes both a Coupé and Cabriolet body style. The 911 Carrera is powered by a 385PS version of the 3.0-litre, six-cylinder boxer engine with twin turbocharging. This power output is 15PS higher than its predecessor.

The Carrera models may be the traditional starting point in the 911 model range, yet they share their premium-quality standard features virtually unchanged from the 450PS Carrera S that was launched last November. Key highlights include the advanced interior with 10.9-inch touchscreen display, comprehensive connectivity and also assistance systems like the global innovation of Porsche Wet Mode that helps modulate the car’s behaviour on wet roads. The 911 Carrera is distinguished externally from the Carrera S models by its smaller diameter wheels and brakes and individual tailpipe covers on the exhaust system.

The 3.0-litre, six-cylinder boxer engine of the 911 Carrera generates its power largely through the smaller turbines and compressors that feature in the new turbochargers. The power is fed to the rear wheels via an eight-speed dual-clutch transmission (PDK). This enables the 911 Carrera Coupé to accelerate from 0-62 mph in 4.2 seconds, with a top speed of 182mph. The optional Sport Chrono Package shaves a further 0.2 seconds off the benchmark sprint. The combined fuel consumption range (WLTP) of the Coupé is 26.6 - 28.5mpg, while the Cabriolet records 26.2 - 28.0mpg. NEDC equivalent CO2 emissions Combined are 206 - 210g/km.

The dynamic chassis set-up includes 235/40 ZR tyres on 19-inch diameter alloy wheels on the front axle. However, the mixed tyre diameter configuration front:rear sees 20-inch wheels with 295/35 ZR tyres at the rear. Stopping power is provided on both axles by 330-millimetre diameter brake discs with black, four-piston monobloc fixed callipers.

The 911 Carrera Coupé starts from £82,793, and the 911 Carrera Cabriolet at £92,438. The new models can be ordered from today at Porsche Centres in the UK and Ireland.

September 2019

Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe and Cabriolet revealed

Following the introduction of the 911 Carrera and 911 Carrera Cabriolet, Porsche now expands the line-up further with the all-wheel drive 911 Carrera 4 and 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet models.

Like the 911 Carrera models, the new Carrera 4 and Carrera 4 Cabriolet are powered by a 385PS version of the charismatic 3.0-litre, six-cylinder boxer engine with twin turbocharging, generating 440Nm of torque from 1950 to 5000 rpm. The power output is 15PS higher than its predecessor.

Fitted with the standard eight-speed dual-clutch transmission (PDK), the 911 Carrera 4 can accelerate from 0-62 mph in 4.2 seconds. When equipped with the optional Sport Chrono Package, this time drops to 4.0 seconds. The 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet accelerates to 62 mph in 4.4 seconds, and in 4.2 seconds when equipped with the optional Sport Chrono Package. Top track speed is 181mph for the 911 Carrera 4 and 180mph for the 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet. The combined fuel consumption range (WLTP) of the Carrera 4 Coupé is 26.2 – 28.2mpg, while the Cabriolet records 25.9 – 27.7mpg. NEDC equivalent CO2 emissions Combined are 210 - 211g/km.

As with the 911 Carrera 4S models, the front axle drive of the 911 Carrera 4 has undergone further development in support of the increased performance. The clutch and differential unit is now water-cooled, and features reinforced clutches to raise durability and load capacity. The increased actuating torques at the clutch improve the adjustment accuracy of the differential and thus the capability of the driven front axle. The enhanced front axle drive in combination with Porsche Traction Management (PTM) promotes an increase in traction on snow, as well as in wet and dry conditions.

The new 911 Carrera 4 and 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet are equipped, like all 911 models, with PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management) as standard. The electronically variable damping system offers two selectable modes, ‘Normal’ and ‘Sport’, emphasising ride quality and handling. A fully variable, electronically-controlled limited slip rear differential with Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV), is an option.

The wheels on the 911 Carrera 4 and 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet feature a staggered diameter, measuring 19 inches at the front and 20 inches at the rear. They are fitted with 235/40 ZR 19 and 295/35 ZR 20 tyres, respectively. Larger wheels of 20/21 inch diameter (standard on 911 Carrera 4S models) are available as an option.

The standard internally ventilated and perforated grey cast-iron brake rotors on the 911 Carrera 4 models measure 13.0 inches front and rear, and feature black four-piston calipers. Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) are available as an option. As is the case for all 911 variants, Wet Mode is included as standard equipment. This function automatically detects water on the road, preconditions the stability control and anti-lock brake systems accordingly, and warns the driver. The driver can then call up vehicle settings particularly suited for wet roads at the push of a button, or by means of the mode switch on the steering wheel (when fitted with the optional Sport Chrono Package).

At first glance, the 911 Carrera 4 models are characterised by the same distinctive design cues as the rest of the model range, such as the clearly defined wheel arches, the front luggage lid with a recess reminiscent of classic 911 models and the full-width LED light strip stretching across the rear.
The only visual distinction between the 911 Carrera 4 and the 911 Carrera 4S derivatives are the rear exhaust designs. To differentiate between the engine variants, the standard 911 Carrera 4 models feature one rectangular, single-tube tailpipe on each side, while the 4S models are fitted with a set of round twin-tailpipes on each side. The optional sports exhaust system, distinguished by two oval tailpipes, is also available.

From behind the wheel, the new 911 Carrera 4 shares its interior with the current 911 Carrera and S models, familiar highlights including new seats, the traditional centrally-positioned tachometer, and the new Porsche Communication Management (PCM) system with a 10.9 inch touch screen and improved connectivity. A control panel of five buttons with the look of classic toggle switches creates the transition to the centre console controls.

The 911 Carrera 4 and 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet are available to order now from Porsche Centres in the UK and Ireland and are expected to reach customers from late October 2019. The 911 Carrera 4 Coupé starts from £88,101, and the 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet from £97,746.

November 2019

New Porsche 911 makes its debut

Unmistakably true to its DNA, the new 911 features a much more muscular stance, and an interior featuring a 10.9-inch touchscreen monitor.

The next generation of flat-six turbocharged engines has been further developed and is more powerful than ever before, with 450PS now standard in the S models. Efficiency has been increased via an improved direct fuel injection process and a new arrangement for the twin turbochargers and charge air cooling system. The power is fed to the wheels by a new eight-speed dual-clutch PDK transmission.

Additional highlights include new assistance systems, including Porsche Wet mode that helps modulate the car’s behaviour on wet roads, Night Vision Assist with thermal imaging camera, supported by comprehensive connectivity that now also uses swarm intelligence. In the UK, the features of the 911 are rounded off by two further exclusive digital offerings: the Porsche Road Trip app for extraordinary tours, and the web-based Porsche Impact emissions calculator for neutralising your individual carbon footprint.

The turbocharged flat-six engine of the 911 Carrera S and 911 Carrera 4S now produces 450PS. This corresponds to an increase of 30PS compared with the previous model. Both 911 models can accelerate from zero to 62mph in under four seconds: the rear-wheel-drive Coupé can achieve this benchmark in 3.7 seconds and the 911 Carrera 4S with all-wheel drive in 3.6 seconds. This makes both cars 0.4 seconds faster than the previous model in each case. This advantage is increased by a further 0.2 seconds with the optional Sport Chrono Package.

Where permitted, the top speeds are now 191mph (911 Carrera S) and 190mph for the all-wheel-drive version. The fuel consumption (NEDC-correlated) of the 911 Carrera S is 31.7mpg combined (equivalent to 205g/km CO2), while the 911 Carrera 4 S records this figure as 31.4mpg combined.

The exterior design is completely new and emphasises the leap in performance for the 911 Type 992. Significantly wider wheel housings arch over the 20-inch diameter front wheels and 21-inch diameter rear wheels. The rear shoulders of the car are now the same width across all models, further highlighting the slim line centre section. Flush integration of the electric pop-out door handles further emphasise the tapered and smooth side contours. The entire outer skin of the body is now made from aluminium, apart from the front and rear sections.

Across the nose the body is 45mm wider, and between the new LED headlights lies a subtle yet distinctive styling feature; a bonnet with a pronounced recess that evokes the design of the first 911 generations. The rear of the new 911 is dominated on all models by the significantly wider, variable-position rear spoiler. Beneath the spoiler lip and spanning the width of the car is a seamless light bar, a now familiar element of the Porsche design language.

The completely new interior is characterised by the clear and straight lines of the fascia design with recessed instruments. Porsche says the 911 models from the 1970s provided the inspiration here. Alongside the central rev counter – typical for Porsche – two thin, frameless freeform displays supply further information to the driver. The centre screen of the Porsche Communication Management (PCM) is now 10.9 inches, and can be operated quickly and without distraction thanks to the new architecture. Located beneath this there is a compact switch unit with five buttons for direct access to primary vehicle functions. In terms of digitalisation, the 911 takes the next step into the future with permanent connectivity as well as new functions and services. Feature highlights of the PCM include online navigation based on swarm data as well as Porsche Connect Plus.

All models feature Wet mode as standard. This function detects water on the road, preconditions the control systems accordingly and warns the driver, who can then set up the vehicle for a particular emphasis on safety, by simply pushing a button or using the mode switch on the steering wheel (when Sport Chrono Package is specified). The warning and brake assist system, also fitted as standard, detects the risk of collisions with moving objects and initiates emergency braking if necessary. Night Vision Assist with a thermal imaging camera is optionally available for the 911 for the first time. The adaptive cruise control option includes automatic distance control, stop-and-go function, reversible occupant protection and an innovative autonomous Emergency Assist function.

The 911 Carrera S Coupé with PDK costs from £93,110 and the 911 Carrera 4S Coupé with PDK from £98,418. Both models are available to order from Porsche Centres in the UK and Ireland from today.

What does a Porsche 911 (2019) cost?