Review: Peugeot 508 (2011 – 2018)

Rating:

Neatly styled. Comfortable and easy to drive. Economical diesels.

Styling imposing rather than elegant. Disappointing ride. Interior build-quality could be better.

Recently Added To This Review

21 October 2019

Owner of 508HDI with fuel pressure problem (October 2016 fixed by Cedar Garage, Tarring Road, Worthing ) and now with 50,000 miles took repaired car (still under 6 years old) back to supplying dealer... Read more

11 June 2019

Report of strange fault with RT6 audio/satnav unit of 2013/63 Peugeot 508. It works perfectly first thing every morning; at other times, rarely. It can suddenly fire up in the middle of a journey, but... Read more

3 February 2019

Report of engine problems with 2011/61 Peugeot 1.6THP petrol at 60k miles. Often, when starting from cold, the engine sounds and feels lumpy, and it has very little power for the first mile or two, but... Read more

Peugeot 508 (2011 – 2018): At A Glance

Large, comfortable and offered with an economical choice of diesel engines, the Peugeot 508 has lots of likeable qualities, with its stylish exterior and low running costs giving it appeal for both families and company car drivers. It's easy to drive and practical too. Sadly it falls short on refinement and price, which means it struggles to appeal when compared to the impressive Ford Mondeo or classy Skoda Superb. 

The Peugeot 508 is extremely stylish to look and its imposing four-door saloon body benefits from coupe-styling cues that give it a definitive road presence, with long swooping curves and an imposing front grille. Inside the 508 continues to impress and its huge cabin will have little trouble carrying up to five adults. 

Boot space is plentiful and most models in the 508 range offer 473 litres that can be extended to 503 litres should you take out the rear parcel shelf. However, while there's acres of head and legroom, the cabin lacks the intuitive touches of its rivals, which means there's a lack of useable pockets and cup holders. There are also some worrying question marks over interior build quality, with some creaky plastics and squeaky trim fixtures. 

All 508 models come stacked with kit, which means navigation, DAB and a seven-inch touchscreen are fitted as standard, along with automatic dual zone air conditioning, cruise control and 17-inch alloy wheels. The engine line-up is economical, with efficient diesels offered alongside a hybrid powertrain. 

The engine range starts with the 1.6-litre BlueHDi with 120PS, but we'd recommend upgrading to the 2.0-litre diesel with 150PS due to the fact it's more pleasant with less noise and better efficiency, with up to 72.4mpg. None of the standard diesels dip below 100g/km of CO2, but company car drivers can opt for the Hybrid4, which combines a 2.0-litre diesel to an electric hybrid system to lower CO2 emissions to 95g/km. 

The 508 is a comfortable car to drive, with a smooth six-speed manual gearbox, cushioned ride and responsive steering, which makes it perfectly apt for munching the motorway miles or wafting through twisty A roads. Wind and engine noise levels are generally low too, which makes the 508 a pleasant place to spend time as a passenger or driver. However, with so much choice in this part of the market, the 508 doesn't excel enough to push its way to an already bustling family and company car sector, which means many will overlook it on price alone. 

Peugeot 508 2011 Launch Road Test and Video

Peugeot 508 RXH 2012 Road Test

What does a Peugeot 508 (2011 – 2018) cost?

List Price from £25,535
Buy new from £24,635
Contract hire from £268.20 per month
Get a finance quote with CarMoney

Peugeot 508 (2011 – 2018): What's It Like Inside?

Dimensions
Length 4792–4830 mm
Width 1853–2068 mm
Height 1456–1525 mm
Wheelbase 2815–2817 mm

Full specifications

The 508's interior is large, with lots of head and legroom in the front and back. This means the Peugeot will carry up to five adults in comfort and even the entry-level cloth seats are supportive, with lots of adjustment for those in the front. However, it's worth speccing up - or haggling - to Allure trim as this includes soft and relaxing half leather seats, which are also electronically adjustable and heated in the front. 

While the 508 is airy and spacious - especially with the panoramic glass roof - we found there was a distinct shortage of practical cabin storage, which means it can be difficult to find pockets to store loose items like a mobile phone or bottle. The dashboard does have a pair of fold-out cup holders, positioned just beneath the seven-inch touchscreen, but these are not very useful due to the fact they completely obscure the infotainment display. 

The dashboard is also rather button heavy, which this means it can take quite a long time to work out what each switch does. The steering wheel is also scattered with buttons and dials that only serve to confuse matters further. However, the interior cabin does get a high gloss finish, with lots of soft-touch materials. The driving position is also good, with plenty of adjustment for both the steering wheel and seat.

On the move the 508 is generally quiet and pleasant thanks to the soft and supportive seats that work well with the car's supple suspension. The 508's cabin gets good levels of sound proofing, with minimal road or engine noising making its way in, although we did notice a few creaks from the dashboard as we navigated coarse roads. The centre arm rest was also prone to squeaking, which raises some concerns over the cabin's longevity.

There's no shortage of boot space though, with 473 litres that can be extended to 503 litres should you take out the rear parcel shelf. However, due to the proximity of the battery, hybrid models only offer a modest 365 litres. Standard equipment is high and all models get electric folding door mirrors, tinted windows, DAB, navigation and a colour seven-inch touchscreen, along with cruise control and automatic dual-zone air conditioning.

Standard equipment

Active models get 17-inch alloy wheels, automatic headlamps and wipers, LED daytime running lights, Rear Parking Aid (includes cruise control and speed limiter, electric folding door mirrors, tinted rear and side windows, electric windows, DAB digital radio (non-hybrid versions only), Bluetooth, CD Player, seven-inch multifunction colour touchscreen, navigation, automatic dual-zone air conditioning and manual seat controls with electric lumbar support.

Allure trim adds 18-inch alloy wheels, LED fog lights, blind spot monitoring system, front and rear parking aid, reversing camera, automatic electric parking brake with hill assist, electrically adjustable and heated front seats, half leather trim along with a panoramic glass roof.

GT Line versions add twin exhausts, full LED headlamps with fully integrated LED daytime running lights and half leather seats with red stitching (manually adjustable without heating function).

GT is the range topping trim and includes 19-inch alloy wheels, colour head up display, Nappa leather trim and electrically adjustable and heated front seats.

Child seats that fit a Peugeot 508 (2011 – 2018)

Our unique Car Seat Chooser shows you which child car seats will fit this car and which seat positions that they will fit, so that you don't have to check every car seat manufacturer's website for compatibility.

Which car seat will suit you?

What's the Peugeot 508 (2011 – 2018) like to drive?

The Peugeot 508 is a smooth and easy car to drive, with soft, supple suspension and agile handling at high and low speeds. There are no petrols in the engine line-up anymore, which means the powertrains are limited to diesels, but the 508 is offered with the Hybrid4 powertrain, with 200PS and 95g/km of CO2.

The range opens with the 1.6 BlueHDi with 120PS, which is sufficient for general motoring with 300Nm of torque and up to 70.6mpg.  However, while the 1.6-litre pulls well enough through the gears, 0-62mph takes 11 seconds and things can get a bit noisy and breathless when joining a busy motorway.

We'd recommend upgrading to the 2.0-litre diesel with 150PS. Not only is it more powerful for overtaking with 370Nm of torque, but it's also cheaper to run with up to 72.4mpg. We also found the 2.0-litre to be quieter and more refined, with less considerably less noise at motorway speeds. A 180PS version is available for those who want to cover 0-62mph in under nine seconds, but this cuts economy to 67.3mpg and is limited to the range topping GT models. 

None of the standard diesels dip below 100g/km of CO2, but company car drivers can opt for the 200PS Hybrid4, which combines a 2.0-litre diesel with an electric hybrid system to lower emissions to 95g/km. Unlike the standard 508 that is front-wheel drive, the hybrid employs four-wheel drive to provide a lot more grip in the corners. 

When the 508 was launched in 2011 the range included a 2.2 litre 204PS diesel, along with two - 120PS and 160PS - 1.6-litre petrols, but these were dropped as part of the 2014 update. The 2.2 diesel is commendable, with lots of pace, but neither of the petrols are recommended due to poor economy and performance.  

On the road the 508 is generally quiet and agile at both high and low speeds. The large windscreen provides lots of visibility and almost all models get hill hold assist and blind spot monitoring, which makes the 508 an easy car to drive in town or on the motorway. The steering is responsive too for a car of this size, providing safe and predictable travel on A and B roads. The drive can be sharpened up with GT Line trim, with large wheels and improved suspension, but this pushes the 508's price into BMW 3 Series territory.

Engine MPG 0-62 CO2
1.6 BlueHDi 74 mpg 11.0–11.3 s 99–104 g/km
1.6 BlueHDi Automatic 67–72 mpg 11.0–11.2 s 99–104 g/km
1.6 e-HDi 66–69 mpg 11.9–12.9 s 109–112 g/km
1.6 e-HDi EGC 66–71 mpg 11.9–13.6 s 104–110 g/km
1.6 HDi 61–64 mpg 11.3–11.6 s 114–115 g/km
1.6 THP 45–46 mpg 8.6–8.8 s 144–150 g/km
1.6 VTi EGC 45–46 mpg 11.5–11.8 s 144–145 g/km
2.0 BlueHDi 67 mpg 8.9–10.1 s 97–110 g/km
2.0 BlueHDi Automatic 64–71 mpg 8.5–8.6 s 95–114 g/km
2.0 HDi 57–61 mpg 9.6–11.1 s 119–130 g/km
2.0 HDi Automatic 50–52 mpg 9.2–10.5 s 140–150 g/km
2.2 BlueHDi Automatic 64–67 mpg 9.2–9.4 s 114–118 g/km
2.2 HDi 48–53 mpg 8.2–9.2 s 140–154 g/km
Hybrid4 79–81 mpg 9.0–9.3 s 91–95 g/km
RXH 2.0 BlueHDi 180 61–69 mpg 8.9–9.5 s 104–119 g/km
RXH 2.0 BlueHDi 200 61 mpg 8.8 s 109 g/km

Real MPG average for a Peugeot 508 (2011 – 2018)

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

81%

Real MPG

27–67 mpg

MPGs submitted

295

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

What have we been asked about the Peugeot 508 (2011 – 2018)?

Every day we're asked hundreds of questions from car buyers and owners through Ask Honest John. Our team of experts, including the nation's favourite motoring agony uncle - Honest John himself - answer queries and conudrums ranging from what car to buy to how to care for it as an owner. If you could do with a spot of friendly advice before buying you're next car, get in touch and we'll do what we can to help.

Ask HJ

Do I need to polish my car before waxing it to protect the paintwork?

I have a 2011 Peugeot 508 SW. The paint work is still in good condition and has a fair amount of shine still. I'd really like to enhance the shine, bringing it as close as I could back to its original shine but at the same time protecting it from the elements. I have been reading various reviews and looking at purchasing the Soft99 Fusso Coat wax, but if I'm right I'd need to purchase something like the Autoglym Super Resin Polish to polish the car before applying the wax. Is this correct?
You need a paint cleaner first. Autoglym does one. That's what I use, then follow it up with Autoglym High Def wax.
Answered by Honest John
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