Toyota RAV4 (2013 – 2019) Review

Toyota RAV4 (2013 – 2019) At A Glance

3/5

+Practical with a good boot and plenty of rear leg room. 2.5 hybrid with 2WD or 4WD available. Five year warranty. Proving very reliable.

-Not as satisfying to drive as some rivals. Interior materials aren't as good as a Mazda CX-5.

Insurance Groups are between 22–29
On average it achieves 79% of the official MPG figure

The popularity of the crossover has ballooned in recent years, but back in the 1990s, when they were still called 4x4s, if you wanted something compact there were only a handful on sale, one of which was the original Toyota RAV4. So Toyota has quite a history with family-sized SUVs, and it shows with the latest RAV4.

This model tows the line between crossover and full-sized SUV to great effect. It’s a very commodious car and there’s enough space for a family, with plenty of legroom and headroom in the back. Thanks to low cabin floor there’s no awkward transmission tunnel either so even the middle seat is useable.

The boot is large and has some neat, practical extras like a net for storing bits and pieces, cubby holes and seats that fold completely flat in one movement. In terms of practicality it's among the best crossovers, bettering the likes of the Mazda CX-5 and Volkswagen Tiguan for overall space.

Toyota offers a choice of petrol or diesel engines but most buyers will go for the diesels. There’s a 2.2-litre with 151PS or a 2.0-litre with 123PS, the former of which is available with an optional six-speed automatic transmission and with 2WD. The only petrol on offer is a 2.0-litre Valvmatic with 152PS available only with Multidrive S CVT automatic gearbox and 4WD.

The least earth shattering engine was the entry-level 2.0-litre diesel, which emits a reasonable 127g/km of CO2 with 2WD and has official economy of 57.6mpg. 

Real MPG average for a Toyota RAV4 (2013 – 2019)

RealMPG

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

79%

Real MPG

25–57 mpg

MPGs submitted

618

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

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Ask Honest John

What should I replace my Honda CR-V with?
"I'm looking for a shortlist of possible options for a used (up to 3 years old) replacement for an ageing Honda CR-V. The Honda has been very practical, but it is now over 10 years old and I would like to try something different. I would still like my wish list to include the best features of the Honda, including good reliability, high driving position, automatic transmission and large luggage carrying capacity, but as it will be used for mainly local journeys with occasional longer trips, I would definitely like much better efficiency, so a petrol/hybrid option would also be preferred."
The Toyota RAV4 is the obvious choice. Both the current and the last generation RAV4 came with a hybrid option that makes them very cheap to run and you don't need to charge them. Both versions are known for their reliability and are also spacious. The Lexus NX is another option but it's quite small, while the RX is big but expensive. If you fancy a plug-in hybrid – which I'd only recommend if you have somewhere to charge the car at home – I'd suggest the new Kia Sorento. You can get PHEV versions of cars like the Land Rover Discovery Sport, BMW X3 and Mercedes GLC, but they're more expensive and not as spacious. Reviews of all these cars, below: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/toyota/rav-4-2018/ https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/toyota/rav4-2013/ https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/lexus/nx-2021/ https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/lexus/rx-2015/ https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/kia/sorento-2020/ https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/land-rover/discovery-sport-2015/ https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/bmw/x3-g01-2018/ https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/mercedes-benz/glc-class-2015/
Answered by Russell Campbell
Can you recommend an SUV with good fuel economy?
"I am looking for a good sized SUV with strong mpg. I really like the Hyundai Tucson but the 35mpg puts me off. As I am only doing daily short trips I'm not sure if a diesel option would be the best fit. I have between £15,000 and £18,000 to spend so I'm considering the Suzuki SX4 S-Cross, which is a hybrid or Renault Kadjar. I am not a badge snob so happy to try a less common brand. What are your thoughts on getting good build quality and mpg? I'm happy to consider 2018 plates onwards."
Of the two cars you mention, the Suzuki will probably get the best real world fuel economy, but both these cars are mild hybrids that make nominal fuel savings of about 5mpg. For a significant saving, you'll be better off with a full hybrid such as the Toyota RAV4 – you don't plug it in, but its larger battery and motor mean it can travel for a few miles on electric power alone, unlike the Suzuki and Renault. Your budget will get you a 2016 RAV4 with highish miles, but Toyotas are know for their reliability and their hybrid systems are also very robust. It's a comfortable and practical car. Here's our review: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/toyota/rav4-2013/
Answered by Russell Campbell
Which cars are big enough to carry two bikes?
"We've just purchased two electric bikes and are looking to buy a car in which we can transport them. We'd like the car to be no older than seven years ideally. The load space needs to be somewhere in the region of 70-inches long (rear seats down obviously), and have as near vertical a rear as possible. Our current car has a bike rack, but we would rather transport them inside the vehicle, from a safety point of view. We do not want a van, but something with rear windows. Do you have any recommendations? "
The previous generation Toyota RAV4 has a huge boot that's even more useable with the seats down – it will have no issues swallowing a couple of adults' bikes in my experience. Other cars I'd recommend are the Kia Sorento and Hyundai Santa Fe. If money's no object, cars like the Land Rover Discovery and Mercedes-Benz GLS have even more room.
Answered by Russell Campbell
What's the best SUV for £10k?
"I'm looking for an SUV under £10,000 that's not only reliable and economical, but also good to drive. We've been looking at the Kia Sportage, Dacia Stepway or Nissan Qashqai. Are these the best options? The age of the car isn't as important as the reliability and economy, but any help would be appreciated."
If you want a reliable SUV then you should buy a Toyota RAV4. Your budget is enough to get a 2010 model with less than 50,000 miles on the clock or a higher-mileage newer car. Both will do everything you need and should be very reliable.
Answered by Russell Campbell
More Questions

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