Over 21,000 dash camera videos uploaded to safety portal since 2018

Published 21 October 2020

Dash cam manufacturer Nextbase reveals that more than half of the videos uploaded to its safety portal have resulted in further police action. The Portal was built to allow drivers to quickly and securely upload footage of dangerous driving to relevant police forces.

Despite Covid-19 lockdowns, the system shows no sign of slowing down this year, of 3805 videos uploaded to the platform – 78 per cent higher than average – in the last 90 days.

The 33 police forces currently using the National Dash Cam Safety Portal (NDCSP) have received 21,324 uploads in total since the portal's launch in 2018. Favoured by police for saving an average of eight hours per case, Nextbase says its platform has saved these forces at least 170,000 hours - which is equivalent of over 20 years of police time.

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By using the NDCSP system, which was created in partnership with security software specialist Egress, the public has assisted police in identifying, warning and prosecuting offenders nationwide. From court cases to awareness courses, or fixed penalty notices to warning letters, 52 per cent of all cases have been taken further by the relevant force.

The video below - showing a car being rear-ended by a driver who's on their phone - was captured by a Nextbase 522GW and Rear Cam.

Fewer than one in five cases have resulted in no further action, demonstrating the success of the platform in identifying the most severe of incidents and linking motorists with police in a bid to crack down on this behaviour. More constabularies are set to join before the end of the year, too.

Richard Browning, Director of Nextbase, added, "Less busy roads can encourage motorists to bend the rules or lose some concentration. However, the Portal was created to make our roads safer and it is encouraging to see that people have still been reporting issues where reckless motorists have thought that they can take advantage of the clear pathways – potentially endangering others."

>>> Mobile phone driving laws tighten

Comments

DaveWK    on 26 October 2020

Would have put this on the NDCSP but had wiped the sd card after loading the video on my pc.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpb_SdmasSM

Apparently the Police require the unedited original with the actual card.
Hardly felt the shunt but found a scratch on the rear bumper later and requested DVLA to provide the vehicle keeper details. October 23rd received a response, an envelope returning the application form V888 which was sent to them in August, estimate for repair and my cheque for £2.50. Note signed by a K.Meredith asks me to supply registration numbers of mine and the offending vehicle, which are clearly displayed on the form!

NEIL SCARLETT    on 26 October 2020

What a fantastic idea, I believe that the citizens of the DDR were encouraged by the Stasi to report their fellow countrymen for supposed misdemeanours. It worked really well, loads of people locked up for perceived wrong doing.

   on 26 October 2020

Reported a p****** that hogged my bumper and then went through a red light directly to my local police. 6 months later they informed me the video had led to a successful prosecution, I have no pity for the idiot at all. Endanger me and I'll do my best to see that your licence is endangered too.

Mr Nexus    on 26 October 2020

We have all been given the authority to be policemen in our own right. When we feel a bit outraged because someone has the audacity to overtake us. When we think that person is going a bit too fast for my own liking. When our perceived attitude of another person's driving leads us to a desire to punish 'because they deserve it'. The problem here is the thin line between petty law infringement requiring no attention to heavy handed punishment for 'crossing the line'.
For me, I don't give a monkey's. If necessary, I may even accidentally, partially obscure a digit on my number plate rendering Police interference impossible.
People, stop being so self righteous. Sure, send in footage of the p****ks, but not for driving styles which slightly disagree with your own.

Robert McAuley    on 27 October 2020

We have all been given the authority to be policemen in our own right. When we feel a bit outraged because someone has the audacity to overtake us. When we think that person is going a bit too fast for my own liking. When our perceived attitude of another person's driving leads us to a desire to punish 'because they deserve it'. The problem here is the thin line between petty law infringement requiring no attention to heavy handed punishment for 'crossing the line'. For me, I don't give a monkey's. If necessary, I may even accidentally, partially obscure a digit on my number plate rendering Police interference impossible. People, stop being so self righteous. Sure, send in footage of the p****ks, but not for driving styles which slightly disagree with your own.

Totally agree with you and with Neil's reference to the Stasi.

Edited by Robert McAuley on 27/10/2020 at 08:10

MartyF    on 26 October 2020

I guess the degree of success following-up submitted footage depends on the police force involved. Essex Police issue a standard "If you do not hear from us within 10 days" assume the matter is not being pursued. Did I hear anything, after having footage of a van driver who cut in front of me, and braked immediately? Nothing. Obviously the police were too busy issuing fixed penalty noticed to pensioners.

Norwblue    on 26 October 2020

Seems to depend on the police force. I was overtaken on a quiet residential road (30mph limit) by two idiots doing an estimated 50 to 60 mph and driving erratically. I offered the dash cam footage to South Wales police but was advised they would take no action unless I was prepared to provide evidence in court.

I'd hoped that the police force would have issued warning letters to the registered keepers as this could well have been sufficient. I didn't particularly want the offenders prosecuted, just given a warning, but this was not an option apparently. I didn't pursue the matter.

Hopefully, sites like this one will encourage the police to be more pro-active.

stephen heath    on 27 October 2020

Norwblue if you did not want anyone prosecuted why report the incident just upset you a bit did it we all make mistakes unless serious just laugh at it and get over it I cant abide tittle tattle drivers

CanAmSteve    on 27 October 2020

I note the rear-ending driver has a dangly toy on his rear-view mirror as well. I believe that is illegal - or it should be due to the effect of its movement "training" the driver's perception to ignore movement in that area and becoming blind to hazards

Westbury33    on 31 October 2020

I dont think it quite compares to the Stasi. Nobody is trying to hear which radio station I am listening to or in which direction my TV ariel is pointing!

I think its a good idea. We have virtualy no enforcement on the roads, so any prosecutions that are made are a bonus to all road users by reducing risk. In an ideal world, we would have some actual police to do the job of policing our roads, but there will need to be significant changes to our administration first.

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