Volkswagen Tiguan (2008 – 2016) Review

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Volkswagen Tiguan (2008 – 2016) At A Glance

Decent SUV with diesel automatic option. Comfortable seats. Escape version capable off-road. Optional Park Assist works well. Much better from September 2011 facelift.

Originally had hard ride. 2.0 TDI PD no longer the best. Fuel economy not brilliant.

Insurance Groups are between 14–25
On average it achieves 85% of the official MPG figure

Oh, no, not another 4x4. Are the roads really that bad? What next: an Audi Hiawatha? By my count, the VW Tiguan numbers the 63rd SUV on the UK market. Should you be even remotely interested?

Well, first there's the badge. VW reliability might not be as legendary as it was. But that Beastie Boy medallion still cuts some sway in snobby Surrey suburbs.

Then there's the back seats. Slightly higher than the fronts, Freelander style, giving kids in the back a view forwards, and making them less likely to chuck up down your neck. These seats are also supremely comfortable, centre rear is fine for adults as well as kids and legroom is generous.

VW Tiguan 2008 Road Test 

VW Tiguan 2.0 TDI SE 2011 Road Test

Looking for a Volkswagen Tiguan (2008 - 2016)?
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Real MPG average for a Volkswagen Tiguan (2008 – 2016)

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

85%

Real MPG

24–58 mpg

MPGs submitted

552

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

ASK HJ

EGR valve has clogged up on my seven-year-old Volkswagen Tiguan 2.0 TDI Diesel
I need to replace the EGR valve on my seven-year-old Volkswagen Tiguan diesel, at a cost of £1200 because it is coked-up. My car was subject to the emissions scandal and was modified by Volkswagen to comply with the regulations. I wonder whether this modification could have resulted in fewer particulates being emitted which were then re-circulated in the engine leading to a premature coking-up of the valve? I have taken this up with VW Customer Services, but they said they could not help me.
Under it's 'Restoring Trust' warranty, VAG guaranteed to put right any 'consequential' issues that could have resulted from the NOx emissions fix for up to 2 years from the fix or up to a total of 160,000 miles whichever came first. Because simply reducing NOx creates more soot that would have clogged the EGR, the fix involved reprogramming the injectors to undertake an additional cycle which could create additional wear. Basically, if a Volkswagen dealer had to replace your EGR, then is should have been covered for up to 2 years from the fix. A few cases are now starting to emerge of EGR/injector failures outside the 2 year limit.
Answered by Honest John
I bought a car that wasn't in satisfactory condition, the dealer then bodged the repair - should I return it for a refund?
I bought a 2014 Volkswagen Tiguan with a full service history from a main dealer. On taking delivery of the vehicle I started to clean it and noticed in the boot under the polystyrene liner was rusty, which came from four drilled holes. Something had obviously been bolted in by the previous owner and then removed, resulting in water ingress from the underside. I contacted the dealer who inspected it and told me they would need the car back to rectify it. I was told by the service manager a new boot floor had been fitted, but on delivery I noticed that all they had done was filled it with filler, rubbed it down and sprayed it. I reported it back to them as they delivered the car to me. They had it for 10 days and it came back in a filthy condition. I am within my 30 days money back guarantee. Should I return it to them for a full refund or should I ask them to source another vehicle or should I have it repaired myself and send them the bill?
That is in no way satisfactory so you are within your rights to return the car for a full cash refund and if it is refused initiate proceedings in the County Court against the dealer who will probably settle out of court. See: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/faq/consumer-rights/
Answered by Honest John
Would a petrol SUV be okay for towing?
I currently have a Volkswagen Tiguan that has been okay on a mixture of short trips and towing a caravan. We've never experienced any DPF issues, but since the emissions fix we have noticed the car regenerating almost every other trip. As this hasn't been the most reliable of cars I've owned, I'm considering changing. Should I go for another diesel, like a Mazda CX-5 or Honda CR-V or do I try to find a petrol alternative?
Tiguan have been a bit troublesome post NOx fix, but Volkswagen is fixing them. Usually they need a new EGR: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/volkswagen/tiguan-2008/?section=good For towing, the problem is getting a petrol-engined SUV with enough torque at low revs. You can get a 2.0 TSI in the much better looking new Tiguan: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/volkswagen/tiguan-2016 In theory, JLR's new Ingenium petrol in the Discovery Sport should be enough, but Disco Sports have had more than their fair share of problems: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/land-rover/discovery-sport-2015-l550 If sticking to diesel, probably the best way to avoid DPF problems while towing is to get one with a fairly low sixth gear so it passively regenerates. My current Renault Kadjar 1.6 DCI 4WD (4WD essential) pulls 2200rpm at 70mph in sixth, so tugging a caravan at 60mph will still be revving high enough to regenerate. And in 19,250 miles, not a single thing has gone wrong - though I did order it on 17-inch wheels with 215/60 R17 tyres and that's a very wise choice.
Answered by Honest John
Our Volkswagen Tiguan went into limp mode after the emissions fix - are they linked?
Our 2013 Volkswagen Tiguan 2.0 diesel had the emissions fix five weeks ago. Last week, it went into limp mode and the dashboard lit up like a Christmas tree. I took it back to Volkswagen. After they had it for a day, they told me it was the wiring loom so they kept it for another day. The car was okay for six days afterwards, then back into limp mode with the dashboard lights back on again. Starting to wonder if I'm being fobbed off and the real problem is the emissions fix.
Take it back to the dealer. Probably a blocked EGR. The dealer is obliged to fix it. Volkswagen Group has sent letters out to Skoda owners to reassure them. It says: “if a customer makes a complaint to an Authorised Repairer or to the Volkswagen Group in respect of a failure of the EGR, fuel injection system or emissions after treatment system within 24 months following the date of the implementation of the technical measures, in respect of a vehicle with mileage not exceeding 160,000 miles, SKODA will consider the complaint very carefully and if such complaint was established to have arisen as a result of the implementation of the technical measures, then Skoda will act responsibly and swiftly, in line with its goodwill policy, as supplemented in the annex, to respond to the consumers’ reasonable concerns.”
Answered by Honest John

What does a Volkswagen Tiguan (2008 – 2016) cost?

Buy new from £21,286 (list price from £25,420)
Contract hire from £234.89 per month
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