Review: SEAT Toledo (2012 – 2018)

Rating:

Looks like a conventional saloon but is actually a hatchback. Huge boot space. Good quality and impressively spacious interior. Great value for money and an ideal family car.

Not the most dynamic looking design.

Recently Added To This Review

12 October 2017

Report of EA189 NOx emissions fix carried out on 2013 SEAT Tolded 1.6TDI at 90k miles and car now very sluggish, engine is noisy and can hear rattling noise on high revs. Feels very heavy and powerless.... Read more

11 August 2017

Report of DPF light coming on after NOx emissions fix on a SEAT Toledo 1.6TDI. No mention of age or mileage. Read more

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SEAT Toledo (2012 – 2018): At A Glance

After a few years absence, the SEAT Toledo is back. The model survived a midlife crisis when it turned into the ugly cousin of the Altea, but now it's slimmed down and once again is very much its own model. SEAT has gone back to a traditional saloon shape - like the popular second generation model - and the Toledo is all the better for it.

It's no secret that the Toledo is the sister car to the Skoda Rapid, but the two look considerably different with the SEAT getting its own front and rear styling. This is the new SEAT family look which we've seen on the revised Ibiza.

The Toledo is a neat looking car and while it's not the most exciting of designs, that probably says more about SEAT's recent design history. We've become used to distinctively different cars like the current Leon and Altea.

Sitting between the Ibiza and the Leon in the SEAT range, the Toledo is based on the same platform as the Ibiza, albeit a stretched one, but is a much bigger car.

In fact the photographs are quite deceptive because at a smidge under 4.5 metres it's almost as big as a Skoda Octavia and actually longer than a Ford C-MAX. Sounds good so far. So you'd think the one big fly in the tapas would be the fact it's a small saloon. Never a popular choice in the UK.

It may not look like a conventional hatchback but the Toledo offers everything you'd get from a family five-door plus a whole lot more. Okay, so the looks are far from exciting and it's fairly ordinary to drive but it still has plenty going for it.

It's impressively practical and surprisingly spacious given its modest size, while the cabin is well finished even if some of the plastics are a touch on the hard side. It's also well equipped, cheap to run and refined on the motorway.

SEAT Toledo Road Test

What does a SEAT Toledo (2012 – 2018) cost?

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SEAT Toledo (2012 – 2018): What's It Like Inside?

Dimensions
Length 4482 mm
Width 1706 mm
Height 1461 mm
Wheelbase 2602–2636 mm

Full specifications

From the front the Toledo looks very much like an Ibiza but inside it's far more spacious with plenty of shoulder room. It's even more impressive in the back. With the front seats slid all the way back there is still enough legroom for those sitting behind while getting in and out is easy thanks to wide opening doors. It's far better than your everyday hatchback.

Interior quality is good too while the simple layout of the cabin means it's easy to work out what all the buttons do. The driving position could do with being a touch lower and some of the plastics on the dashtop and doors are hard rather than soft touch, but aside from that it's all spot on as a family car.

It feels well built and hardwearing, there's plenty of storage including a big glovebox plus there's good all round visibility, even with the high boot, so parking isn't a problem.

Standard equipment from launch (November 2012):

E models have black door handles, tinted windows, two cupholders, illuminated boot, height adjustable front headrests, two height adjustable rear headrests, electric front windows, height and reach adjustable steering column, 12v power supply, CD stereo, aux-in port, 15-inch steel wheels and 'Urban' covers with 185/60 R15 tyres, tyre repair kit, driver and front passenger airbags, head-thorax front side airbags, ESC Electronic Stability Control, Isofix points in outer rear seats with Top Tether anchor points.

S models get air conditioning, body coloured door handles, heated and electrically adjustable door mirrors, a rear windscreen wiper, height-adjustable driver's seat, chrome air vent trim, Bluetooth with voice control, USB port, six speakers, trip computer, split folding rear bench, front electric windows and electronic stability control and a spare wheel.

SE adds 16-inch alloy wheels, front foglights with cornering function, climate control, height-adjustable front passenger's seat, a cooled glovebox, front and rear armrests, cruise control, side storage compartments in the boot, rear electric windows, 16-inch 'Design' alloy wheels with 215/45 R16 tyres plus a leather steering wheel and gear lever. The SEAT Media system which adds a colour touchscreen, sat nav, DAB radio and Bluetooth streaming is available as an option.

Child seats that fit a SEAT Toledo (2012 – 2018)

Our unique Car Seat Chooser shows you which child car seats will fit this car and which seat positions that they will fit, so that you don't have to check every car seat manufacturer's website for compatibility.

Which car seat will suit you?

What's the SEAT Toledo (2012 – 2018) like to drive?

The engine line-up includes all the familiar SEAT units from the Ibiza. The cheapest model is the 1.2-litre 16V petrol with 75PS but the turbocharged 1.2 TSI with either 86PS or 105PS looks a better bet and is more economical too.

The top petrol is the 1.4 TSI with 122PS that gets a seven-speed DSG automatic gearbox as standard. It's a real gem of an engine that's fitted in several cars including the Audi A1 and it's just as good in the Toledo with a 0-62mph time of 9.5 seconds. There are rumours of an FR version in the pipeline which would get a more powerful version of the same engine.

However, our choice would be the diesel. The 1.6 TDI unit has 105PS with a five-speed manual gearbox and returns a claimed 72.4mpg in S trim with steel wheels. Go for the SE with alloys and it still manages 70.6mpg. Emissions under 110g/km mean it's band B for VED, currently only £20 a year.

With 250Nm of torque, the common rail diesel pulls well in-gear and at 70mph it's barely breaking sweat at just over 2000rpm, making for relaxed motorway progress. Thanks to the light weight of the Toledo - the diesel is around 1250kg - it never feels underpowered either and providing you don't rev it too hard, it's quiet and unobtrusive. It suits the Toledo perfectly.

The Toledo feels very settled at motorway speeds and it's impressively refined with very little wind or road noise. Take it onto more demanding roads and it's still very capable with good steering and nice positive gear changes from both the five and six-speed 'boxes. The ride can be fairly unsettled and bouncy on poor quality roads but the handling is reassuringly safe.

Engine MPG 0-62 CO2
1.0 TSI 60–61 mpg 9.8–9.9 s 106–108 g/km
1.0 TSI DSG 60 mpg 10.2 s 107 g/km
1.2 75 46 mpg 13.9 s 137 g/km
1.2 TSI 105 55–57 mpg 10.3 s 116–118 g/km
1.2 TSI 110 58 mpg 9.9 s 110 g/km
1.2 TSI 85 55 mpg 11.8 s 119 g/km
1.4 TDI 90 72 mpg 11.7 s 89 g/km
1.4 TDI 90 DSG 71 mpg 11.8 s 94 g/km
1.4 TSI DSG 49 mpg 9.5 s 134 g/km
1.6 TDI 105 64 mpg 10.4 s 114 g/km
1.6 TDI 105 Ecomotive 71–72 mpg 10.4 s 104–106 g/km
1.6 TDI 115 67–72 mpg 10.0 s 107–109 g/km
1.6 TDI 90 DSG 63 mpg 12.2 s 118 g/km

Real MPG average for a SEAT Toledo (2012 – 2018)

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

85%

Real MPG

36–72 mpg

MPGs submitted

109

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

What have we been asked about the SEAT Toledo (2012 – 2018)?

Every day we're asked hundreds of questions from car buyers and owners through Ask Honest John. Our team of experts, including the nation's favourite motoring agony uncle - Honest John himself - answer queries and conudrums ranging from what car to buy to how to care for it as an owner. If you could do with a spot of friendly advice before buying you're next car, get in touch and we'll do what we can to help.

Ask HJ

DPF light keeps coming on after the emissions fix - did they do a botch job?

I'm having problems with my DPF light coming on after the emissions fix. Is this a typical occurrence with the SEAT Toledo 1.6 TDi? What do they do to the vehicle when it undergoes the update and do you get many complaints from other owners after the recall work?
Tends to happen with badly maintained, high mileage or short distance driven cars. But you should have a letter from SEAT stating that any post-fix problems will be considered under a new 24-month warranty, up to 160,000 miles. A DPF tends to get full of ash from around 80,000 miles anyway.
Answered by Honest John
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