Review: Peugeot 107 (2005 – 2014)

Rating:

Cheap to run. Economical and perky 1.0-litre engine. Fun to drive. Decent cabin room. Ideal first car. 2012 model emits 99g/km CO2.

Not good for long motorway journeys. Some problems with leaks. Clutch and waterpump failures common on 2005 - 2009 models. Stronger clutch fitted from 2009.

Recently Added To This Review

12 August 2018

Report of electric power steering of 2006 Peugerot 106 reluctant to power up on cold mornings. Read more

18 April 2016

Unfused starter relay of 45k miles 2008 Peugeot 107 stuck on and burned out starter motor. Read more

9 April 2015

Haynes manual now available for Citroën C1. Peugeot 107, Toyota Aygo Petrol (2005 - 2011) 05 to 11 reg, price £22.99. Covers hatchbacks with 998cc 1.0 litre petrol engines. Does NOT cover diesel... Read more

Peugeot 107 (2005 – 2014): At A Glance

As small city cars go, the 107 has almost the perfect dimensions. It's designed to be easy to drive and manoeuvre into tight spots and thanks to the wheel in each corner design the it's ideal. That clever design means it's also neatly proportioned. The flat rear and raked windscreen give it a sporty feel and it certainly has a more distinctive and youthful appeal than many small cars. It's no surprise this is such a popular car for younger drivers who have just passed their test.

The 107 is in fact the sister car to the Toyota Aygo and Citroen C1 which isn't exactly hard to spot. They're all built at the same factory and the good news is that it was largely designed by Toyota so it's well built, durable and reliable - traits that aren't always a Peugeot strength. On the road it feels more substantial than you'd imagine given its fairly dimunitive size and is actually very good to drive with a precise gear shift and a peppy 1.0-litre engine with 68bhp.

It's no performance car but it is very cheap to run. That little three-cylinder engine is ideal in town as it pulls well from low revs, yet it will still average 62.7mpg and CO2 emissions of 106g/km means it's in the cheapest car tax band that isn't zero. It's even available with a semi-automatic gearbox called 2-Tronic which is pretty rare on a car this small while insurance is group 3 (in the new 1 to 50 group ratings) which was group 1 in the old system.

With low prices, both new and used, the 107 is a good value choice too, but that doesn't mean you get a cheap interior. It's well built and stylish inside with a good quality finish and a neat layout. Passenger space is decent too, considering the little Peugeot is less than 3.5 metres long and even taller drivers won't feel cramped. As city cars go, the 107 is pretty much the perfect package.

Road Test similar Toyota Aygo here: Toyota Aygo 2006 Road Test

What does a Peugeot 107 (2005 – 2014) cost?

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Peugeot 107 (2005 – 2014): What's It Like Inside?

Dimensions
Length 3430 mm
Width 1630–1855 mm
Height 1465–1470 mm
Wheelbase 2340 mm

Full specifications

With no shiny cheap plastics on show and a neat dash material the Peugeot cabin feels well finished. Importantly the materials look and feel pleasant and are of a far better quality than you'll find on other budget cars of this size. With unusual heater controls, a user-friendly stereo and a funky pod-style speedometer the design is fresh and attractive while the translucent section stylishly glows orange at night. There are some exposed bolts on the doors, but luckily they're hidden away and don't spoil the cabin too much.

Despite an overall length of less than 3.5 metres there's good space in the front too, although knee room can feel a little restricted, especially since there's no height adjustment on the seats. The chairs themselves are quite narrow and flat but they are surprisingly comfortable, even on longer journeys. Rear passenger space is adequate but taller people will find legroom is a squeeze and stowage is compromised by the fact the speakers take up most of the space on the door pockets. But given this is a city car, its exactly what you'd expect.

The boot could be better though - and it's not just its small size. To save money the tailgate is simply a piece of glass and this leaves you with a high load sill while the capacity is just 139 litres. However at least it has 50/50 split folding-rear seats, which boost capacity to 751 litres overall and means you can fit in a bike. It's easy to see where else money has been saved on the Peugeot. There's exposed metal on the doors, although the firm will no doubt point to this as a styling element, no glovebox and the rev counter is an option. Plus the fuel filler flap uses a cheap metal clip to close and there's no lock either.

Equipment from launch (June 2005):

Urban was initially the only trim available and comes with electric power steering, driver and passenger airbags, a CD radio with an MP3 socket, ABS with EBFD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution) and CSC (Cornering Stability Control), remote central door locking, electric windows, 50/50 split folding rear seats with Isofix mountings, body-coloured door mirrors and door handles, side-rubbing strips and a rigid removable rear parcel self.

Urban Lite is below the Urban in the range and was launched in November 2006 as an entry-level model. It has electric power steering, driver and passenger airbags, the CD stereo with MP3 socket, ABS with EBFD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution) and CSC (Cornering Stability Control) and is available in Laser Red, Citrus Yellow or Raven Black.

Sport XS was added in January 2007 and is distinguished by coloured (depending on the body colour) stripes, alloy wheels and red trim in the interior. The actual equipment levels are identical to the Urban.

Verve is the top model and comes with air conditioning, 14-inch alloy wheels, a rev counter and exclusive availability of the new Mandalin Orange paintwork.

Child seats that fit a Peugeot 107 (2005 – 2014)

Our unique Car Seat Chooser shows you which child car seats will fit this car and which seat positions that they will fit, so that you don't have to check every car seat manufacturer's website for compatibility.

Which car seat will suit you?

What's the Peugeot 107 (2005 – 2014) like to drive?

A wide track helps the 107s handling. Despite its tiny 14-inch wheels and thin tyres, grip levels are good and there's plenty of bite under braking. As you'd expect there is some body roll but the speed sensitive steering impresses providing good feel when cruising and decent feedback. Those small overhangs and great all round visibility make nipping in and out of traffic simple, while the almost vertical rear means that reverse parking is trouble free.

The dimunitive 107 is also very light, weighing in at just 825kg the tiny hatch is certainly trim. That low figure is helped by the super light 998cc engine, which tips the scales at just 67kg. It produces 68bhp and with its characterful exhaust note and three-cylinder thrum it's great fun to use, delivering sprightly performance. Good throttle response and a positive five-speed gearbox help so the 107 doesn't feel out of its depth on open roads - in fact it's a revelation and great fun if not especially fast. The official 0-62mph time is 14.2 seconds with the manual gearbox (it's 14.9 seconds with the 2-Tronic gearbox) which doesn't look that impressive, but the little engine is happy to be revved, although it can get noisy.

It's not an ideal car for the motorway, due mainly to its lack of torque and quite high revs, but it cruises happily at 70mph and will keep up with traffic with few problems. Despite its weight and size it feels stable too - helped by its relatively wide track. This helps the handling and with go-kart like reactions and responsive steering it feels nimble and sure-footed through bends. The ride quality could be improved but it deals with rough urban roads better than its rival and doesn't crash over potholes. Elsewhere, it's easy to drive thanks to a light clutch and gearshift while the vibration you usually get from three-cylinder engines is well insulated.

The electronically controlled 2-Tronic five-speed manual gearbox is quite an innovative system. There is no clutch pedal and two gear selection modes are available - "E" or Easy - where the selection of the required gears is totally automatic or a more active mode with "clutch-less" gear changes made manually by the driver. The Easy mode means the driver doesn't need to manually select gears and is suitable for city driving, like a conventional automatic. There's a creep function, so the car will move smoothly away as soon as the brake pedal is released. In manual mode you just pull the gear lever back for up shifts, and push forward for downshifts.

Engine MPG 0-62 CO2
1.0 61–66 mpg 12.3–14.2 s 99–109 g/km
1.0 2-Tronic 61–63 mpg 14.0–14.9 s 104–106 g/km

Real MPG average for a Peugeot 107 (2005 – 2014)

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

83%

Real MPG

40–66 mpg

MPGs submitted

234

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

What have we been asked about the Peugeot 107 (2005 – 2014)?

Every day we're asked hundreds of questions from car buyers and owners through Ask Honest John. Our team of experts, including the nation's favourite motoring agony uncle - Honest John himself - answer queries and conudrums ranging from what car to buy to how to care for it as an owner. If you could do with a spot of friendly advice before buying you're next car, get in touch and we'll do what we can to help.

Ask HJ

Why is there a water leak in our Peugeot 107?

My elderly friend has a 2012 Peugeot 107 Active. It suffers from water ingress in the front passenger footwell. We have had it investigated by a local garage who have not cured it. Do you know what likely cause of leak please ?
You can fix this yourself with a teapot spout brush. The most common reason is blocked drains to the bulkhead ventilation well leaving rainwater nowhere to go except via the pollen filter into the car. The vent well is the well underneath the grille at the base of the windscreen. The drains are either side.
Answered by Honest John
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