Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupe (2016) Review

Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupe (2016) At A Glance

4/5
Honest John Overall Rating
There is a lot to like about the Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupe, and if it’s the one that catches your eye most out of its rivals - which it might well be - then it’s a very solid choice.

+Elegant and sleek styling, beautifully judged balance of ride quality and handling, plush-feeling interior, cracking diesel engine, comfortable on the road.

-You need option air suspension for best results, C200 engine is rather thrashy, rivals are marginally more practical.

Insurance Groups are between 31–50
On average it achieves 76% of the official MPG figure

The 2016 Mercedes C-Class Coupe is competitive in pretty much every area compared with rivals such as the Audi A5 and BMW 4 Series. It’s comfortable and enjoyable to drive, classy inside, reasonably practical thanks to four decent seats and a decent boot, and it comes with a good amount of luxury and safety kit. Perhaps most importantly for coupe buyers, though, it looks the absolute business, thanks to its bold details and its curvaceous rear end. Very worthy of your consideration.

Putting looks before what’s on the inside doesn’t automatically make you a shallow person. Just look at the Mercedes C-Class Coupe for proof. Granted, it’ll only hold four people rather than five like the C-Class Saloon will, and the boot can’t swallow as much luggage, either, but when it looks this good, you can really see why some people would happily make the trade.

A stylish two-door take on the compact executive saloon is hardly a new idea. The German ‘Big Three’ have been punting out cars like this for years, and these days, things are very tight between the C-Class Coupe and its big rivals, the Audi A5 and BMW 4 Series, in terms of size, space and price. In fact, it’s pretty much nip-and-tuck in every area, so what does the Merc do that the others don’t?

Well, for starters, it delivers a more relaxed driving experience, with a softer, more absorbent ride and a greater emphasis on refinement.

Find an example fitted with optional air suspension - as we suggest you do - you’ll live an even more comfortable and sophisticated life. You’ll need to choose your engine carefully, as some of the smaller petrol ones don’t really deliver on performance and quietness, but go for the C220d diesel, and you can’t really go wrong.

It feels pretty sophisticated in other ways, too. The interior quality is great, with plush materials and thoughtful, stylish finishes, while the amount of standard luxury kit you get is generous enough to hammer home the feeling of luxury. You get plenty of safety kit, too, so even though your brood will be more cramped than they would be in a C-Class Saloon, they shouldn’t be any less safe.

Drawbacks? Well, the car uses Merc’s older-school infotainment system, so the super-clever functionality on other models isn’t available here, while not all versions get Apple Carplay or Android Auto as standard.

Like we said, a couple of the engines aren’t really up to muster, and when push comes to shove, rivals from Audi and BMW are a shade roomier and more entertaining to drive.

Ask Honest John

Can you suggest a small, premium hybrid?
"I drive a 4-year-old Mercedes C-Class - which I love. But even before lockdown, I thought it was time to get a smaller car and venture into the world of hybrids. I'm looking for a high-spec, small, self-charging hybrid - either a hatchback or small SUV. I do mostly local journeys but some longer ones so I don’t want to go fully electric yet. On the Mercedes, I'm used to a high spec and lots of gizmos so I am looking for the most luxurious small car - this time with 5 doors, that is easy to park. I realise performance will not be as good as I'm used to but would like to get the best I can. My car is my luxury item in life so cost is not a big issue. I would be very grateful for your recommendations."
We'd recommend a Lexus UX 250h. It's a small hybrid crossover SUV with a premium cabin. Lexus is Toyota's premium brand and owners are generally a very satisfied bunch: https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/honest-john-satisfaction-index-2020/honest-john-satisfaction-index-2020-the-results/ You could also consider the CT 200h hatchback although it's been around for a number of years and is showing its age a bit now. Alternatively, look at a Toyota C-HR or the excellent new Yaris – they won't feel as classy as your Mercedes, but they're very dependable and efficient cars.
Answered by Andrew Brady
Would a cracked alloy fall under warranty?
"We have a Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupe and the warranty is three years old next year. We've had the car since July 2020, purchased from a reputable Jaguar dealership. We're the second owners. We have just found out that the car has a slow puncture (or so we thought). Upon inspection at the tyre repair garage, it has been uncovered that the alloy has a crack in it, which has been previously repaired (badly). Would/should Mercedes have covered this under warranty from the first owner? If so, why did the previous owner not wish to go down this route? Should it still be covered under warranty now? Not sure where we stand legally with all this. Your help and guidance is appreciated as always. Many thanks."
Mercedes might have covered the damage under warranty if the fault was down to poor manufacturing – and the previous owner could prove this – but what's more likely is that the wheel hit a pothole and it was this that caused the crack. Unfortunately, low profile tyres and the large wheels they're attached to are prone to this sort of damage. You could try and get the Jaguar dealer to pay up, but again, I'm not sure how you would prove the damage was already there and not caused by you hitting a pothole. I'd write a letter to the dealer you bought the car from – explain the issue, the evidence you have that it was a poor repair and argue that the damage should have been picked up before the car was sold. If the car was described as being in "excellent condition" (or words similar) this will also help your case. Repairing a wheel shouldn't cost much for a dealer so that might stand you in good stead, although I think your best hope might be a goodwill gesture.
Answered by Russell Campbell

What does a Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupe (2016) cost?