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Honda CR-Z (2010–2015)

Last updated 10 January 2018

Video Road Test

Kerb weight 1159–1210 kg
Warranty 3 years / 90000 miles
Servicing 12,500 miles

Full specifications

Driving

Honda only offers one engine option – a 1.5-litre i-VTEC petrol linked to an electric motor. Power is sent to the front wheels via a slick, precise and enjoyable six-speed manual transmission. With this car being a hybrid you might expect excellent economy but the official figures are unremarkable compared with modern turbo petrol engines – fuel consumption is 56.5mpg for the Sport variant or 54.3mpg for the heavier GT.

You’re quite likely to get close to that in real world driving thankfully, because the hybrid system works really well. It assists the engine when it needs to and regenerates seamlessly under braking. The stop-start system is about as unobtrusive as they get, so getting around town is relaxing.

The CR-Z is much more at home out of town. Honda’s engineers have done a fine job with the handling, making a car that is an absolute pleasure to drive on a twisting road. There’s not much body roll and the steering is wonderfully-weighted and precise, giving a feeling of agility that rewards an enthusiastic driver.

That involving driving experience is enhanced by a purposeful exhaust note and well-spaced gear ratios, allowing you to wring every last rev out of the engine between gear changes without ending up at three-figure speeds. Indeed, the CR-Z isn’t actually all that quick in comparison to some cheaper hot hatches, with a 0-62mph sprint taking just shy of ten seconds.

There are three selectable driving modes available, selected by buttons on the dashboard. Normal, which the car defaults to every time it is started, offers a blend of performance and economy, while Econ prioritises fuel economy, with a less responsive throttle set up and more regenerative braking. There’s also a Sport setting, which gives the engine maximum assistance from the electric motor.

From 2012 Honda added an S+ button on the steering wheel, which allows you to effectively engage sport mode for a short sprint. In theory this should be useful if you’re pootling along in Econ mode and need to overtake, but in reality it’s a bit of a gimmick – it doesn’t make that much difference and the button for the proper Sport setting is hardly tricky to reach. 

Engines

Engine MPG 0-62 Top speed CO2
1.5 i-VTEC 54–57 mpg 9.1–10.1 s 124 mph 116–122 g/km
 

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