Drivers over 50 say car makers are 'out of touch with reality'

Published 20 February 2020

CD players and ignition keys are the top features missing from new cars, according to the results of a survey released today.

Saga insurers polled 6500 over-50s and found that 99 per cent don't believe that new cars are designed with them in mind - despite older drivers accounting for an 'overwhelming' amount of new car sales.

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Those questioned ranked reliability, price and safety as their most important considerations in new cars, while features like lane assist and automatic braking were at the bottom of the list.

While senior motorists across the UK agreed that they miss ignition keys and CD players, those in Wales also said they wanted to see a return of manual window winders. Nostalgic respondents also longed for a return of hood ornaments and wooden steering wheels, along with chrome plating.

"While safety and reliability are key, for those of us that grew up in the heyday of design classics such as the Jaguar E-Type and Mini Cooper, today’s modern gadgets are a poor substitute for beauty and a fun drive," said Saga Magazine's motoring editor, Jeremy Taylor.

“With over 50s accounting for an overwhelming proportion of new car sales, manufacturers should make the needs of our generation a priority. Many feel car-makers are out of touch with what their key customers actually want.”

Top 5 missed car features by region of the UK

  England Wales Scotland
1 Ignition keys CD players Ignition keys
2 CD players Ignition keys Chrome plating
3 Chrome plating Hood ornaments Hood ornaments
4 Wooden steering wheels Chrome plating CD players
5 Hood ornaments Car window winders Wooden steering wheels

Comments

glidermania    on 14 February 2020

"Hood ornaments"? Are these over 50's Americans? Im 63 and I can only say I really dont miss any of those 5. The only thing I miss is electric folding mirrors and easy to hard wire in ancillaries.

Dunfermin    on 14 February 2020

Thin 'B' pillars.

I am not exceptionally tall when you consider todays youngsters, but the roll over safety requirements have resulted in very thick B pillars which mean, I must either try to look behind them or lean forward to see if anything is approaching from the right. Definitely NOT a safety improvement.

Olga Lockley    on 20 February 2020

Agree. Thick door pillars make pulling-out of a blind road even more dangerous.

jchinuk    on 1 March 2020

They are a safety improvement if the car rolls...

Dag Hammar    on 15 February 2020

Among the many items mentioned in the article is wooden steering wheels.
I was fortunate enough to own a Jaguar S type for a couple of years that had a wood and leather steering wheel. Sounds a bit sad but I must say using that steering wheel was an absolute joy.

DLDLDL    on 15 February 2020

Ignition Keys as in non-keyless locking? I would support that, but I don't mind a "good old-fashioned" start button.

Those 5 items are an odd list; are we sure they were the pet hates or a ranking from a presumed list designed to appeal to old fogeys? So many others to choose from!

I would like to see the end of low profile tyres; we should not be doing more than 70mph, so why F1 profile tyres? Higher profile tyres give greater comfort and you are less likely to kerb your wheels.

I would like to see the end of the centre console that wraps around you as if you are a fighter pilot; I'm not, I'm a car driver and I don't want to keep banging my elbow on these consoles or having to sit like Quasimodo (as you lower a height adjustable seat the console should go down as well - your arms don't get shorter!).

I would like to do away with gangster glazing that makes cars look like those "discrete" "vans" that go to collect bodies from old peoples homes.

I would like to do away with all those electric sensors that have a better claim than me to good forward vision and block my line of sight.

I'd like to see a return of a proper spare wheel (and tyres that are bi-directional). Punctures are very rare; but if you have one late on a Saturday night driving the length of the country; do you want to be restricted to 50mph for 50 miles?

I'd do away with car "designers" and bring in more proper vehicle engineers!

bobber    on 18 February 2020

Low profile tyres are not "F1 profile tyres", not yet anyway. F1 currently use 13" wheels with high profile tyres. The tyres are a significant part of an F1 car's suspension. I agree low profile tyres are a nightmare. They are supplied cheaply as OEM parts so that the tyre companies can make big profits when replacements are needed.

Olga Lockley    on 20 February 2020

DLDLDL Definitely agree with the last sentence.

Edited by Olga Lockley on 20/02/2020 at 16:17

hissingsid    on 15 February 2020

My Top 5 Missed Features would be :

Spare wheel. Handbrake. Manual heater controls. CD player. Front parcel shelf.

It is not just the car manufacturers who are out of touch with the over 50's. So are most motoring journalists, including some of your own. Consider the recent review of the Citroen C5 Aircross, a comfortable softly sprung car clearly aimed at the more mature buyer. It clearly did not appeal to your young reviewer, who punctuated the film with a series of annoying pop video clips. When I criticised these pointless interruptions all he could say in reply was "I like them".

We the over 50's are the buyers with the money. We deserve better than this. Grow up.

Edited by hissingsid on 15/02/2020 at 09:49

edinburra    on 17 February 2020

Well said. The reviews on this site are poor verging on unwatchable. No consideration for those out with the reviewers age group. Perhaps there should be an over 50’s section with a more mature presenters

Marcus T.    on 24 February 2020

"Spare wheel. Handbrake. Manual heater controls. CD player. Front parcel shelf."

My sisters 14 year old CRV has all of the above.She has had it from new and it's been very reliable and it still goes like a tank.

trevor 166    on 15 February 2020

totally agree with hissing sid. I will not buy a car without a spare wheel, or one with keyless entry.

I am most reluctant to buy one without a proper handbrake either , and dislike many items on modern cars which only serve to add unnecessary complication and push up future repair bills.

I feel modern cars are boring, and full of irrelevant tech that simply leaves me cold. I long for a quality car with essential kit such as airbags but without all the modern complication that serves no purpose. Until one arrives I will continue to run my ageing Toyota and my MGB with money waiting in the bank for when makers wake up to what buyers like me want.

Martin of Derbyshire    on 15 February 2020

62 years old, and none of these bother me. But the lack of a spare wheel (space saver or full sized, I don't care) is a deal-breaker.

NickSLK    on 15 February 2020

I thought similarly until I realised I’d never attempt to change a wheel. And if you call a breakdown service then it’s not too relevant either way. Run flat tyres, though a bit costlier, are likely to be on my next car.
My wife’s SEAT Arona has a spare wheel for about £100 extra, and handbrake and an ignition key. It’s a great little car!

DLDLDL    on 15 February 2020

I thought similarly until I realised I’d never attempt to change a wheel. And if you call a breakdown service then it’s not too relevant either way. Run flat tyres, though a bit costlier, are likely to be on my next car.

True last time I changed a wheel was actually in the last century!

But

On that occasion I hit a pallet in the offside lane which took the tyre off the rim. (Those Citrön BX adverts about retaining control on three wheels were true - thankfully)

I was facing a long journey into the night. The chance of a Kwikfit outfit being open and stocking the right tyre would have been remote, so I would have been stuck with "50 miles at 50mph max" on a skiny-saver (whether my own or now an RAC supplied universal spare), looking for somewhere to stay and hoping that there was a tyre fitter open on a Sunday.

But I had a full size spare (which I had rotated with the other wheels so was of approximately equivalent wear), completed my journey and dropped off the tyreless wheel at my local tyre fitter the next week for them to re-tyre it whilst I was at work.

But perhaps attitudes have changed and £100 to avoid the small possibility of a major pain in the a*** is no longer seen as sensible.

Paul Jenkinz    on 19 February 2020

I thought similarly until I realised I’d never attempt to change a wheel. And if you call a breakdown service then it’s not too relevant either way. Run flat tyres, though a bit costlier, are likely to be on my next car. My wife’s SEAT Arona has a spare wheel for about £100 extra, and handbrake and an ignition key. It’s a great little car!

Runflats are good in theory and perhaps arguably safer but in practice they give you a much harsher ride because there is no give at all in the tyre sidewalls

ruairi50    on 2 March 2020

RUN FLATS are useless we had them before and changed them as the ride was Rock HARD and b***** annoying if you do get a PUNCTURE you have to replace the tyre as run flats cannot be repaired and there not cheap

Colin Cowpat    on 17 February 2020

Martin, have you ever tried.changing a wheel on a modern car with alloy wheels?

Chances are it will be welded onto the hub and you will not be able to shift it unless you are Charles Atlas. Thats one of the reasons I drive a car with run flat tyres and dont believe stories about poor ride, they are much improved over the last twenty years.

ruairi50    on 2 March 2020

Well if you think run flats dont give a poor ride you must be used to having cars with a Crap ride

hissingsid    on 15 February 2020

One of the cars on my short list the last time I changed was the Honda HR-V.
Despite there being enough room for a full size spare wheel under the false boot floor, the salesman told me that Honda could not even supply a space saver as an extra cost option, let alone a full size spare. All they supplied was a can of gunge which would ruin any tyre it was used in.
I asked what would happen if a wheel was damaged and had to be replaced. Would Honda supply one from stock? The salesman had no answer, so he also had no sale.

Instead of trying to sell us the cars they think we ought to have, the manufacturers should produce the cars we actually want.

Oldboy    on 16 February 2020

You may have had a crap salesman. A "spare" might not have been on the options list, but as you speculate, they could almost certainly source and supply a replacement rim if required.

If I had been keen on the car I would have toddled round to the Stores to see if they could supply a suitably sized wheel.

I would then very likely insist that the salesman chuck in such a wheel, or lose the deal !

Oldboy    on 16 February 2020

You may have had a crap salesman. A "spare" might not have been on the options list, but as you speculate, they could almost certainly source and supply a replacement rim if required.

If I had been keen on the car I would have toddled round to the Stores to see if they could supply a suitably sized wheel.

I would then very likely insist that the salesman chuck in such a wheel, or lose the deal !

ruairi50    on 2 March 2020

Head down to a car dismantler and get yourself a wheel and tyre for £50 and get yourself a good scissors or bottle jack and a wheel brace for another £50. its for peace of mind

Eudo H.    on 15 February 2020

Two days after i finalized my order for a new Ford Tourneo Connect LWB Lynx with the Ford dealer in Reinach, I received a call from Ford Switzerland; They wanted to make sure that i had not ordered the manually operating side windows by mistake. 'What about the tolls?' the concerned employee asked me.

That was November 2003 and the car, complete with trouble-free windows, is now a 155000 miler. If i had an idea of what a good car it would turn out to be i would have specified a hood ornament too!

Miniman777    on 15 February 2020

Saga survey? ROFLMAO.

That really is a dated list.
CD player? So 90s..fumblilng to change disc? Music on the iPhone, Spotify etc, is on trend.
Wooden steering wheel? No, no, no. It's not the '50s. Nice soft leather please.
Ignition keys? Why? Fumbling in the rain to unlock? No comfort access is the way, keep they key in your pocket, touch the door and away.. Latest BMWs have keys which switch off power and can be retrofitted to some models.
Chrome plating? May be ok, depends, but can be overdone.
Hood ornaments. There's the clue, they survey is aimed at Americans as we call it the bonnet. And no, ornaments are sooooo tacky.

Just glad I'm not a Saga customer, they seem detached from reality.

Engineer Andy    on 16 February 2020

Saga survey? ROFLMAO. That really is a dated list. CD player? So 90s..fumblilng to change disc? Music on the iPhone, Spotify etc, is on trend. Wooden steering wheel? No, no, no. It's not the '50s. Nice soft leather please. Ignition keys? Why? Fumbling in the rain to unlock? No comfort access is the way, keep they key in your pocket, touch the door and away.. Latest BMWs have keys which switch off power and can be retrofitted to some models. Chrome plating? May be ok, depends, but can be overdone. Hood ornaments. There's the clue, they survey is aimed at Americans as we call it the bonnet. And no, ornaments are sooooo tacky. Just glad I'm not a Saga customer, they seem detached from reality.

Not everyone is as computer/tech savvy as you. Many older people didn't grow up with that and as the old adage says - "You can't teach an old dog new tricks".

Just you wait until a new generation comes along and poke fun at you for not being able to cope with the new tech! You won't be the one laughing any more.

BTW - keyless entry has contributed to more car thefts in recent years than anything else, so going back to either the key only or combined key & blipper is a good thing, especially as you can check your car is locked without moving a long way from it and getting someone else to check the door handle.

Paul Jenkinz    on 19 February 2020

cant beat the sound of a cd pplayer on a quality system i hear what ya saying about ipods and iphones etc they are great and you can store lots of music in them but you cannot beat the sound quality of a cd ok im 46 and remember before the cd era when we only had radios then along cme cassettes and how they were often chewed up in the casstte player and you had to carry a pencil aound with you those around 40 will know what im talking about but to me CD is still king

aufdermaur    on 20 February 2020

as much as I love CDs at home - in the car they take up space and are a liability to try and change while you are driving. I Bluetooth my phone to my car speakers, pop my phone on a dashboard mount, and I'm good to go. Spotify holds all the music I have on CD and it's a lot easier. Also my CDs don't get damp or damaged rolling around in the car.

hissingsid    on 16 February 2020

I totally agree, and would add that electronic parking brakes have caused many well documented accidents, and complex touch screen menus are dangerous to navigate whilst driving. Knobs and switches may be considered old fashioned by some, but they can be operated without taking your eyes off the road.

Anonymus    on 16 February 2020

I totally agree that the manufacturers went the wrong way. Obviously, cars are no longer designed by engineers but by marketing experts who "know" what customers need.

People over 50 are the people who usually have the most money and are the best customers. They are capable and will to pay more to get better product and bigger comfort. However, cars are made as if the best buyers are young street racers. Auto journalists also make a significant contribution to this, because if the car is comfortable and practical, it will get poor test scores due to bad handling and "instability" or "dull" behaviour or appearance. This is where manufacturers and journalists have lost touch with reality because they test family cars on racetracks and evaluate their capabilities for what such cars are not intended for.

I wish the cars weren't getting lower and lower because it's harder for older (50+) people to get in and out from low cars. At the same time, MPVs are disappearing from the market, and SUVs are being offered as an alternative, but they have comfort issues that are important to "older" people. I wish the cars weren't getting longer and longer because towns are crowded with cars as never before and it's more and more difficult to use longer and longer cars in the city. Optimal dimensions of car segments were lost and now we have cars "somewhere between" - or too big, or too small.

I miss cars with comfortable suspension. Again, people are being told the story of safety and increased power of engines. However, a comfortable suspension does not negatively affect safety at all, contrary, because a car has to be used in the way it is intended for. Anyone who wants a fast ride can buy a sports car. In addition, most engines are getting smaller, and their power and top speed are not increasing. In my area, the highest number of deaths is in cars that have stiff sports suspension. It's not a problem in the suspension but in the mentality and culture level of the driver.

I don't want to invest more money in advanced trim, and be punished with bigger rims. I miss cars with comfortable seats. I have a sick spine and then I have to listen to the story that it is best for me to have a hard seat. Of course!

I do not want to operate the car via the touch screen, especially not control the air conditioning. Isn't it absurd that police can punish you by typing on your cell phone while driving, but for typing on a screen in a car there's no penalty?

I don't want a car that is completely black inside, like a funeral car. Why it is so difficult or complicated to offer interiors in some normal, lighter color? Beige, gray, cocoa . . . Everything has to be black. Why? I don' wear all black clothes an furniture and walls in my house are not black.

I don't want a car that has small windows and a cockpit surrounding me, so I feel like an F1 driver in it. I want to have a good review from the car, both for safety and pleasure.

Wooden steering wheels, manual window winders, hood ornaments, CD players, ignition keys . . . I think they are a missed topic. The research was obviously conducted by car marketing "experts".

Edited by Anonymus on 16/02/2020 at 18:30

edlithgow    on 17 February 2020

I'm in the demographic, but not the income bracket, so I'm still running an (unfortunately irreplacable) banger,

If I had the money I'd probably be running an irreplacable classic, though that'd make me nervous.

This means the things I miss are a bit further back in time, (though a couple of my manual window wipers are missing).

1. manual brake adjustment. Never had an automatic adjuster that wasn't a PITA .

2. Rear wheel drive (OK, still just available, but I'm NOT buying a BMW).

3. Non-interference engines. Enhanced Catastrophic Failure Potential isn't progress in my book

4. Chain or geared timing..Enhanced Catastrophic Failure Potential isn't progress in my book. OK, some chains are fragile but generally a better bet than the rubber band

5. A freewheel. Never had one, but coveted a SAAB with one.

6. A starting handle. Only had one, but it was nice to have and cost buttons for the OEM, yet they took it off the MkII

7. Something else I've forgotten (Like I said, I'm in the demographic)

Wildcard 1 : An engine preluber. AFAIK no production cars have ever had them, yet it would be nice to have and cost buttons for the OEM,

Wildcard 2 : An engine preheater, like on army landrovers.AFAIK no production cars have ever had them, yet it would be nice to have and cost buttons for the OEM,

Wildcard 3 Bypass or centrifugal oil filtration. The FIAT 124 had the latter. AFAIK no production cars have ever had the former, yet it would be nice to have and cost buttons for the OEM, Probably quite a few buttons though.

Wildcard 4 : Twiddle brakes, would go nicely with the RWD. AFAIK no production cars have ever had them, yet it would be nice to have and cost buttons for the OEM,

Wildcard 5 : Air-adjustable ground clearance. Would go nicely with the RWD and twiddle brakes. Some high end production cars have air suspension but not, AFAIK, for adjusting the ground clearance.

Some of the wildcards might be doable fairly cheaply as aftermarket add-ons.

Edited by edlithgow on 17/02/2020 at 18:03

Stephen Wharfe    on 17 February 2020

It would seem that the more luxurious a car is deemed to be, the bigger the central console has to be. We have a Jaguar XJ and the console is far too big really limiting space both for driver and passenger. Also the tyre profiles are too low resulting in a ride that is acceptable but not quite good enough for a luxury car. The handling steering, braking and roadholding, performance and economy are all excellent. I suppose you cannot have it all ways. But having said that we also have a Range Rover Sport and that really does tick all the boxes.
SW Cheshire

Trevor G Jones    on 17 February 2020

Agree with most things on here as regards modern cars. Also although the website is good the guy that does the road tests annoys me so much I have not seen one in a long while.
Not sure where the guy reckons that he has trouble removing an alloy wheel comes from, I never had a problem with either the custom wheels on my pickup some years ago or on my T5 camper both of which had spare wheels. As regards not having punctures very often, I have had three since 1998 all of which meant I had to have a new tyre as the tyre split so if I had not had a spare, I would have had problems, as it was I was on my way in 10 to 15 minutes.
As regards the wind down windows, great. We had a VW T5 camper with electric windows, mirrors and the 6 speed box Now where we live there are a lot of narrow lanes and those mirrors stick out a long way although I never broke one but last year we swopped it for a VW T4 coachbuilt, half a metre longer, half a metre higher but slightly more narrow. The T5 pushed out 145 BHP, the T4 102 and it weights 200 Kgs more so it is not fast but with it's wind down windows and mirrors that have to be adjusted by hand and you have to drive like vehicles of old. My wife loves it. Our other vehicle is my wife's car, she has owned it longer than she has known me, a 2004 Vauxhall Zafira she bought new and had a stainless exhaust put on it which it is still and with 147,000 miles from new I have to admit I am surprised how reliable it has been, she has hardly spent any money on it apart from normal replacements. I replaced the Continental tyres with Michelins when I first knew her. My garage tells me I ought to buy her a new car, I told him he must be joking, you would not get the amount of stuff we get in that in an SUV.

aufdermaur    on 18 February 2020

God you comment regulars are such old fogeys. Maybe YOU are the ones who are out of touch.

Mino    on 18 February 2020

I don't get the "hood ornament".. I can't think of many cars that the oldsters would have driven that ever had one. Unless they reminisce for their dad's old Morris or something...? But yes, the oldies have a lot of sense.. Electronic anything is just something else to go wrong in 5 or 6 years time that can only be fixed by replacing a control computer or module... £600 to you squire (never mind that a TVm which is just as complex can be bought for £300)... and that's if they even make them any more.

New cars... just portable landfill, isn't it? :D

Edited by Mino on 18/02/2020 at 07:51

Ian Bickerton    on 18 February 2020

I’m surprised the survey didn’t highlight the lack of a comfortable ride in modern cars. I grew up with the French cars of the 60s to 80s and Jaguar XJ , which managed to combine a comfortable ride width good handling. The Peugeot 504 was a supremely comfortable long distance tourer. After a back operation I’m now having to sell my 4WD (in Aus) for a more comfortable SUV and was considering the Citroen C5, sadly I found your jokey, dismissive video review of the C5 very poor. It just reinforces what a lot of retirees think of the attitude car manufacturers to our requirements.

Caracal    on 18 February 2020

I've just replaced my new Volvo V90 with an 18 year old BMW E39 530i. Why? Well, the Volvo, brimming with technology, was to my mind unsafe and unpleasant to drive, requiring the use of a laptop touchscreen in the centre consul to carry out even basic interactions, and with the car making independent and debatable judgements about steering, braking and parking. Oh, and the voice control more often than not misheard or misinterpreted spoken instructions - especially when the sunroof was open or passengers were chatting. The 2002 BMW 530i on the other hand concerns itself only with having superbly engineered engine, transmission, suspension etc, and leaves me to do the driving. I interact with the car through clearly labelled buttons and knobs. Simple! So, I'm actually enjoying my driving again - and although I can't communicate through social media whilst on the move (heaven forbid), or stream the latest rap music (heaven forbid) - I can listen to the FM radio, to the cassette player, and to the multi changer CD system. Oh, and did I mention the BMW has got a real handbrake!
Happy days.

madf    on 18 February 2020

I miss the dilithium matrix and the flux capacitor and the inability to achieve Warp 5

Dragonetti    on 18 February 2020

Some mighty strange things there. Somebody misses chrome trim? Just another thing to look unpleasant without weekly polishing. Wooden steering wheels? Get real folks. Who needs death by a thousand splinters?
They’ll be telling us next that they miss carburettors and chokes. Add in contact breaker points and you’re right back in the days of my first cars. I remember fondly that feeling of would it start, would it flood, would it complete the journey, would it need complicated servicing after three thousand miles.
The list goes on. I’m only 70 minus a few months so not completely out of it yet but after having driven 30,00 miles per annum in varying unreliable death traps as a young man I’m more than happy with modern cars that start reliably, don’t break down, are quiet and comfortable and as a bonus are likely to let you survive a considerable impact if the worst happens.
Strange thing nostalgia when it comes to reliability and safety.

edlithgow    on 18 February 2020

WOT, no quarter light?

(For the benefit of yoof, a quarter light is/was a wee triangular window section in front of the main sliding window, hinged on a vertical axis to provide some venting)

Don't think I've ever had one, but it'd probably be quite useful, especially here in Taiwan, as my window winders are stiff and I don't use the aircon.

apdriver1    on 19 February 2020

I just love the irony of this article titled Drivers over 50 say car makers are 'out of touch with reality'. And yet all these supposedly mature minded well grounded drivers want a wooden steering wheel!!?? LOL!!
So what other yesteryear features would make the manufacturers ‘in touch’ with reality? A dashboard gramophone perhaps? Maybe a cassette player on the optional extras list? How about a wind up phone with separate corded mouthpiece and earpiece? Or maybe a fine leather covered hand crank starter handle, ah but actually no you lot would prefer a wooden one. Surely you’d want driving gloves with that wooden steering wheel – actually help us out here;- would an unheated wooden steering wheel be more, or less ‘in-touch’ than a heated wooden steering wheel?

Mr_Blibby    on 19 February 2020

I run three cars and choose to change one of them every 12-18 months - I like to have all the toys, but dislike the current trend of the more 'premium' the car the skinnier the tyres, without any other options - I dont want to be rattled around in my car on holey UK roads or replacing wheels/tyres after hitting a pothole - give us a choice or some decent wheels but with practical tyres. The other trend I notice is the new mass of hybrid engines forcing the removal of a 'proper' spare wheel to house the batteries or recover the additional weight - I for one, want to know I can fit a spare wheel without having to battle with a can of shaving foam on some dark wet road. Finally, I noticed that many manufacturers have started not supplying the service book and instead relying on electronic records updated by the franchise dealers - its not a perfect solution, bit I prefer to have the freedom to choose who I get to service my vehicles... Could they also add the crank back to wind up the car from the front if you have a flat battery :)

Edited by Mr_Blibby on 19/02/2020 at 12:18

Olga Lockley    on 20 February 2020

Mr Blibby They should never have done away with the starting handles. - you never know when it is going to be useful.

Phian    on 19 February 2020

I own a 2003 BMW 325i and dread the day I have to choose a replacement. With good maintenance and relatively low mileage it is my hope that this car will see me out. The car has an excellent sound system by Harman Kardon but I have never used the 6 CD player as the radio and music from my phone via Bluetooth are enough for me. In well over fifty years of driving this is the best car of the dozen or so I have ever owned. I would miss electric windows, comfortable heated leather seats and the various other features and have no desire for keyless entry, cameras (the beeping reverse warning is enough for me and less distracting than looking at a screen) and other modern whistles and bells I have experienced on cars rented on trips to USA.
I cannot agree with those who hark back to wooden steering wheels, window winders and suchlike but good luck to those who do, perhaps they should look for a well restored classic.

hissingsid    on 20 February 2020

I have a foot in both camps. My everyday car is a 2016 Mazda CX-3 bought new. It is reliable and economical, but like many crossovers it is let down by a noisy unforgiving ride, even on sensible 16 inch wheels. It has a proper handbrake, a chain cam normally aspirated petrol engine driving through a proper torque converter automatic transmission, and yes a CD player!

My classic car is a well restored and reliable 1970 Rover 3.5 Litre Coupe, which is quiet comfortable and thirsty, in fact everything the CX-3 is not. If it was good enough for Prime Ministerial transport throughout the 1970's and for the Queen's personal motoring when driving herself, it is good enough for me.

retiredspeedmerchant    on 21 February 2020

What a load of old t***! Bonnet ornaments? Really? Ignition keys? Try buying basic models, they usually still have keys. I'm over 60 and enjoy driving modern cars. Own a SUV and a hot hatch. Both capable of 140mph. Embrace the tech, I say!

jchinuk    on 1 March 2020

Apparently I'm an exception, I'm a "senior" (62yo) and miss none of those things. They removed 'hood ornaments' because they tended to impale people you hit. CD players were a pain, though I had a couple of cars with 6CD changers. Chrome plating was awful, just something else to polish and for water to get trapped behind.

It's obvious that those surveyed really wanted half-timbered, mock Tudor Morris 1000 Travellers, which (whisper it) were not very good cars when new.

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