Me-first driving - Gen
After reading a few of the other threads I had this thought...

Personally I find the growing me-first attitude on the roads encouraging.

I was driving on a road the other day and a single queue of traffic threaded back for at least a mile and half. Another straight on lane empty (signs saying it closed in half mile or something etc). Illogical. Went in the empty lane and saved at least 30 minutes queue. Why do people do that, enjoy queues (especially being at the back of one)? The person who "let" me in hooted their horn, shocking for someone to not enjoy queuing I suppose.

Isn't it obvious to use the two lanes until the one ends? Why create an unnecessary queue.

Or what about the overly "polite" motorway driver who always pulls into the slow lane. If you're doing 75 stick in the middle lane, why cause yourself the hassle (and danger) of having to pull out again at the next lorry. Or even worse expect the sensible drivers who stayed in the middle lane to let you out of your repeated mistake.
Me-first driving - Morris Ox
I half thought the title summed this one up, but I'm not so sure.

I can see what you're getting at from the queueuing perspective, but I have to say that in my experience the number of times one lane stays empty with everyone queueing is an exception; on most two-into-ones it's normally a case of merge at a sensible distance from the two-into-one only to see some smart alec dive in as late as possible to gain not 30 minutes but 30 feet. Pointlessly inconsiderate, in other words.

As for the polite motorway driver, strictly speaking we have an inside lane and two overtaking lanes, so this practice is entirely correct - if you're not overtaking move back in. I'm sure there are some pedants who do this excessively but, again, in my experience they're outnumbered by members of CLOC.
Me-first driving - Gen
Oh, don't confuse me with the I'll overtake the car in front in the bus lane brigade ( predominantly found in Tube Zone 2-3 London . I'm talking serious time saving.

As to inside lane and two overtaking. If you're doing 75/80 and pull in at a semi busy time you will have to pull out again soon. To pull in is to cause traffic jams further back as the next doing 76 will 'block' you in and you will pull out and shock brake back or slow to lorry speed and slow down everyone when you do pull out. I did about 90 miles at 75/80 in middle lane the other day (I will slow down to 50 if a lorry is overtaking a lorry as I can't be bothered to change lane) and watched a guy in car in front pulling in every time and having to expect me to allow him out again.
Me-first driving - Morris Ox
As to inside lane and two overtaking. If you're doing 75/80
and pull in at a semi busy time you will have
to pull out again soon. To pull in is to cause
traffic jams further back as the next doing 76 will 'block'
you in and you will pull out and shock brake back
or slow to lorry speed and slow down everyone when you
do pull out. I did about 90 miles at 75/80 in
middle lane the other day (I will slow down to 50
if a lorry is overtaking a lorry as I can't be
bothered to change lane) and watched a guy in car in
front pulling in every time and having to expect me to
allow him out again.

Gen, all this is telling me is that you're travelling too fast for the prevailing traffic conditions. I don't mean an unsafe speed necessarily, rather that, in advanced driving parlance, you're not using your speed to make smooth progress.
Me-first driving - amcluesent
Good thinking. Can I suggest another advantageous move? Approaching a busy round-about along a twin lane, you want to turn first left but there is the usual queue in the left hand lane (half of whom are going straight on). Just nip down the right hand lane and then go all the way around so you have the priority. Simple.
Me-first driving - Aprilia
Came up to a big queue (both lanes) at a roundabout on a dual carriageway. Bit surprised to see one of Gen's ilk in a big 4x4 pull onto the grass central reservation and proceed to drive along it all the way to the roundabout (about 300m) before cutting in onto the road again. Guess he didn't like queuing either.........
Me-first driving - Gen
I'm in trouble now I have an ilk!

Where exactly did I say drive on the grass! Doubt my car would survive it if I wanted to.

Let me ask you this: how many times on the motorway is there two solid lanes of traffic when the outer lane is closed in two miles time and the lane is empty. What is the result? Queue goes back further, queues build up back on entrance roads, back onto the roundabout before, and block people who don't even want to use the motorway. It is inefficient use of motorway space, and cause havoc for people behind. Where's the good driving in that?

The road is best used as if the cars were water naturally filling every available space.
Me-first driving - jeds
I saw a bizarre incident a couple of months ago. The third lane was closing about a mile up ahead and the other two lanes were at crawling pace. A car (Renault 5 seater mini van thing) sat in the third lane for the whole mile preventing anything from passing. Must be awful to be so insecure.
Me-first driving - TrevP
"If you're doing 75 stick in the middle lane, why cause yourself the hassle" - of having to think and plan ahead.

FAR too difficult!
Me-first driving - AR-CoolC
I had a very similar incident happen to me a couple of months ago.
2 lanes with roadworks up ahead, I use lane 2 (because I too don't like to sit in a long que of traffic whilst there is a free lane ) when a coach loaded with passengers pulls out to halt my progress nearly side swipping me ( and I have to add I was crawling along the lane - not hurtling down at 70 )

Heaven forbid I should adopt the zip method at roadworks...
Me-first driving - Wales Forester
I saw a bizarre incident a couple of months ago. The
third lane was closing about a mile up ahead and the
other two lanes were at crawling pace. A car (Renault 5
seater mini van thing) sat in the third lane for the
whole mile preventing anything from passing. Must be awful to be
so insecure.


I was aggrieved by an HGV doing the same 800yds prior to the taper on a dual carriageway closure in North Wales, so I phoned the Drivecare number on the back of his trailer and registered my disgust at his attitude.

Made me feel better.
PP
Me-first driving - Andrew-T
Gen - I agree with your theory [not sure about the water analogy though]. On the north-eastern approach to the Runcorn bridge there is about 1km of double which has to merge into single near the bridge, with 40 mph all the way. Most drivers know this, so 80% stay in the left lane while the rest zoom down the outside and try to shove in at the end, which naturally causes some bad feeling. But it does help to stop a tailback to the previous traffic light.

If more drivers agreed to 'zip' together taking turns (which funnily enough usually happens 200m further on, on the bridge itself) perhaps both lanes would fill more reliably.
Me-first driving - Blue {P}
I'm not sure I understand, if people had used both lanes on the approach to the roadworks that you mentioned, then all tat would happen is you would get two slower moving queues as people have to let each other in when the road finally narrows.

If theres only one lane then only one car can pass at a time and the quickest and most efficient way for that to happen id for the traffic to go through from one queue so that there is no need for it to slow to let other drivers in...

Unless I'm been really stupid, but I dont see how splitting the queue into two for the same lane can be any faster than having one queue, in fact, I think it would be significantly slower overall...

The only way that this works to save time is when most people queue but one person goes up the empty lane, and then forces people who have been in the long queue to slow down to let them in...

Blue
Me-first driving - Blue {P}
Oops, by the time I'd read the whole thread it seems I'd forgotten what the first post said! I take it the road is always like that, not caused by roadworks!

What I said did apply heavily to the Wear Bridge though during it's 18 month roadworks, most queued in the lane that was still open, but some people insisted on going down the closed lane and then forcing everyone to slow down to let them in... If only a drove a battered lorry :-)

Blue
Me-first driving - Picasso Driver
On the subject of Zip merging I agree with Blue.

Consider this. The throughput measured at a single point on a single lane is 1800 vehicles per hour at 2 second gaps between vehicles.

When observing vehicles passing such a single point, can the observer detect if the traffic was previously queuing in one or more than one lane. No. Thought not.

Thus you have a choice between one lane 2x long travelling at 2y speed, or two lanes x long travelling at y speed. The end result, in the single lane section, is the same.

That is if you ignore the additional braking, accelerating and increased risk of collision caused by last minute Zippers.


PD
Please keep your distance
Me-first driving - Hawesy1982
Thankyou Picasso Driver, for putting that down in easy language -i was just trying to figure out a way of explaining that myself.

Can i also add that i think most drivers would consider it much more inconvenient to be stop-start at 10mph queueing in two lanes than they would to be at a steady 20mph in one.
Me-first driving - Andrew-T
Yes, Blue and PD. But it also remains true that a queue in one lane uses twice as much road as in two lanes, so the previous pinchpoint (in the Runcorn case a major traffic-light junction) is affected sooner by queuing in one lane only.
Me-first driving - Wales Forester
Gen,

If you're continually being stitched up by other drivers not letting you change lanes on the motorway then I think you'll find that in the majority of situations you are not planning ahead and are therefore allowing the blocking situation to arise in the first place.

For example, if you're in lane 2 and you've just completed overtaking a slower vehicle, then yes you should move back into lane 1. Equally, you should be aware of vehicles behind you (in all lanes), their speed, and the likelihood that they will reach you before you need to pull out to pass the next slower vehicle in lane 1, and you should plan your next move accordingly.
So if once you're past the slow vehicle there is another not far away then yes stay in lane 2, but if the next vehicle to pass is a dot on the horizon then remember we drive on the left in the uk, and move over to lane 1.

You're talking about not causing hold ups by driving down the empty lane at roadworks etc, but with the next breath you're saying it's ok to hinder the progress of other vehicles on the motorway because you can't be bothered changing lanes.

PP

Me-first driving - scotty
Gen - I hope you're on a windup - if not consider yourself rebuked for ungentlemanly behaviour - didn't your mother ever teach you to wait your turn.
Me-first driving - Gen
Okay

With empty lane point. If we have both lanes used a queue may be a mile long. If two lanes are used there is a one mile queue. The longer a queue the more likely it is to snake back far enough to cause queuing blocking other routes round a roundabout further back etc. Or stop people wanting to leave the queue getting to an appropriate turn off/exit. As such to use the empty lane is considerate driving and to join the end of the queue is to be selfish.

As to if you are driving at 75/85 why go to the first lane? What is the result of this religious following of the rules? Cars looking in a mirror don't expect a car hurtling down the first lane and so will more likely impede it's progress. It will involve much more often lane changing, a clear danger in motorway driving. I'm not condoning it but if you are driving at 100, stay in the third lane and only move in when another car wants to go faster. Of course avoid holding up other cars. But, often the hold ups are caused because of cars pulling in to lanes they shouldn't be in. How many times do cars that pull into the second/first lane from a fast moving stream in the second/third lane and proceed at the same speed then want to pull back out when the inevitable lorry appears? This is what causes the problems.

At least that's my view!
Me-first driving - Steve S
If you overtake correctly, you can't be in anyones way!

Lane hogging and queue jumping are likely to cause more trouble than either is worth.

Nothing more irritating than some numpty stuck in the one of the overtaking lanes on a clear motorway or dual carriageway.
Me-first driving - Wales Forester
Gen,

Get real!
It is an offence to obstruct the flow of traffic, this includes hogging lane 2 for no reason.

As for the queuing, you'll end up being forced into the cones if you meet someone like me when you're trying to push your way to the front, I hope you learn your lesson when it happens.

I won't type any more on this as it is obvious that myself and others are wasting our breath.


PP
Me-first driving - flatfour
Planning ahead reduces stress and stops you getting up the noses of other drivers, we should all think where we are going and the consequences.
Every evening on the M4 between Cardiff and Newport the outside lane is full of cars doing 50, bumper to bumper, no one in the inside lane Why?
Also I have recently incurred a number of queue jumpimg coming up to roundabouts, a driver in the right hand lane who turns left infront of other drivers blowing his horn and jesticulating.
Today whilst in the crown of the road indicating to turn right I was overtaken by the person 2 cars behind, yes again jestures!
Whilst riding with a collegue, he indicated left and pulled over into a parking space on the side of the road, again a woman stopped by his window and shouted abuse at him for slowing her down?
I now drive treating all other road uses as idiots who could do anything at any time! sorry if that offend you all, but be prepared the Idiot is coming your way shortly, and he or she has had the highway code wiped from the brain!
Me-first driving - BobbyG
On the roadworks closing scenario, if everyone followed Gens lead then we would have 2 lanes ground to a halt, albeit only half the distance.
You then have cars fighting to get in which causes the traffic to slow up even more. As soon as you see the tailback starting everyone should move in to the one lane and then they will all be able to progress at a steady pace. To the HGVs who block the outside lane, I salute you.
Me-first driving - flatfour
Agree with you totally BobbyG
Me-first driving - leatherpatches
childish drivel deleted. M.
Me-first driving - Morris Ox
I really hope your tongue was in your chek for some of that. Otherwise it was pretty nasty.

Calle me po-faced, but I don\'t like reading that kind of stuff on here.

neither do I, its gone away. M.
Me-first driving - Gen
I missed what was written so I'll just assume it was about what a terrible person I am. That's unfortunate and unnecessary. The benefit of this site is that we as drivers can understand what the other drivers are thinking/doing. In a lot of circumstances both drivers involved will think they are right.

I'll give you an example: I started a thread a while ago about who has priority on a hill. I thought uphill always priority because stop/start harder up hill; someone else thought downhill from braking reasons. Who's right? Who knows, but at least we'll both know why the other may think they have priority.

I also cannot answer for people who drive on grass verges, overtake to gain one place in traffic etc etc.

When a lane is disappearing and traffic is going at 40 I'm not going to go down the disappearing lane and play chicken with you/cones. But if traffic is stationary/5mph I'm not going to leave a lane empty either. If you don't want to let me in I'm not going to be driven into cones, because I won't be moving. If you're seeing red I'll let you go and hope you calm down before you hit a kid.

I'm not a punch bag for any/all bad driving you have received and can be ascribed to me (either personally or by ilk) and anyone involved needs to question why they need to have one.

I personally think that not using road space appropriately either through misguided politeness (empty lanes) and overobedience to highway code (excessive left lane left lane) is causing danger and congestion on the roads. Guilty so shoot me!
Me-first driving - Mark (RLBS)
I'll just assume it was about what a terrible person I am.


You'd be wrong. It was just an unnecc. agressive and silly note accusing someone else of being self-righteous blah blah blah.

It added nothing, and deleting it lost nothing.
Me-first driving - Wales Forester
No-one is trying to use you as a punchbag Gen, apologies if anything I've said has made u think that.

However you must appreciate that you are in the minority with your views on these points.

PP
Me-first driving - Mark (RLBS)
On a non-moderating note........

Truck drivers who block a lane because they don't wish to use it drive me nuts. If it was deemed neccessary to block the lane 2 miles back from the obstruction, then there would be cones there doing it.

Fair enough in the last few hundred yards, because people should be merging by that point; but I passed one the other day on the A43 where the trucks must have been stopping the queue 3 miles back from the incident. What is that about ?

Personally I will drive down which ever lane is the more empty and zip in 300 yards or so before the obstruction.
Me-first driving - Wales Forester
My earlier post about the HGV at 800yds stationary would not have bothered me if we'd been at say 200yds, I completely agree with you on that one Mark.

PP
Me-first driving - Mark (RLBS)
I have always thought that the main issue with traffic merging is that someone feels ownership for the lane that continues. I've always felt that if they put cones in both lanes reducing it to one lane that straddled the white line, causing *both* lanes to have to move over, that the "zipping" would be much smoother.
Me-first driving - Wales Forester
Good idea Mark, but then we'd have to start explaining blindspots and use of mirrors.

PP
Me-first driving - Gen
Thanks Mark, I guessed wrong...

I too wonder why trucks seem to be strong on this kind of view. A little irrelevant but am I the only one who feels a little queasy when passing those monster trucks Australia and America have. The thought of a 100mph joint speed impact is nasty.



Me-first driving - Gen
Just read the post about two lanes going into one zip style. A good idea at slow speed but could get hairy when traffic lighter and thus faster. But there is a special 'marriage' sign I remember from my distant memory for two lanes into one.
Me-first driving - Andrew-T
I thought only vehicles showing the correct uniform were entitled to control traffic? Anyone else doing it is just an arrogant bully.
Me-first driving - Gen
That's right. Just one exception car boot sale staff in yellow jackets are allowed too [wink]
Me-first driving - LHM
I'd have to say that 'me-first' driving is merely symptomatic of a broader 'me-first' society...........
Me-first driving - mr_right
Going back to the message that started all this off, it is the same in petrol stations (well at my local one) When you go to pay there could be 3 people serving, why do we queue in one queue when there is the possiblity of queuing behind all three cashiers.

I was behind someone the other day then looked to find three cashiers so i went and stood behind one of the other customers and the person behind me started to moan. I just replied with "There are three cashiers not one therefore why should i queue in just the one queue" they didnt say a word but were rather annoyied.



Again it also goes back to people who queue at petrol stations to use the relevant pump depending on which side of the car there petrol cap is. I dont bother, im just straight in at anyone pump as they are designed to reach round the car so why all that extra queuing for nothing no thanks!!

I dont think any of what i do is unpolite or inconciderate, just me using my brain to grab at an opportunity that someone else has missed out on!!

Me-first driving - hootie
why do we queue in one queue when there is the
possiblity of queuing behind all three cashiers.
I dont think any of what i do is unpolite or
inconciderate, just me using my brain to grab at an opportunity
that someone else has missed out on!!



The reason that there is one queue is so that the person who's been waiting the longest to get served, gets served next - simple! It's what's known as good manners, or perhaps you think that people are 'simple' for having them?
Me-first driving - Rob C
>>Again it also goes back to people who queue at petrol stations to use the relevant pump depending on which side of the car there petrol cap is. I dont bother, im just straight in at anyone pump as they are designed to reach round the car so why all that extra queuing for nothing no thanks!!

I dont think any of what i do is unpolite or inconciderate, just me using my brain to grab at an opportunity that someone else has missed out on!!<<

I love doing that, the look of indignation on some peoples faces that I've jumped the queue, on a pump they weren't actually queueing for.
Me-first driving - Gen
Or having the initiative to go round and reverse into the space you can't get to because of a car been on the behind pump.
Me-first driving - KB.
I've often seen people barging in front of others patiently waiting their turn, be it on the road, charging up the outside and pushing in at the front - or in shops/supermarkets/pubs and loads of other places. I've always thought "wouldn't it be nice to know what sort of person they really were, whose own destination is so much more important than anyone elses and who doesn't give a hoot about manners and consideration of other peoples feelings".

And lo and behold, now I have an insight, at first hand, on what goes on in the mind of one of those special, important people whose business is so much more important than mine.

I'm grateful for that.

By the way - what do you do with that extra three and a half minutes that you save every day?
KB.
Me-first driving - Fireball XL5
I agree with mr Right. I've got a good job and a good car. I got where I am by siezing opportunities, not by waiting for some half-wit in front of me with less initiative. Call me arrogant if you like but the world need movers and shakers to get things done.
Me-first driving - KB.
"Call me arrogant if you like"

You're arrogant!

What a valuable site this is, in giving such an insight to our fellow motorists and human beings.

Keep it up.
KB.
Me-first driving - KB.
\"Thanks for the advice guys. The speedtraps.co.uk website looks useful.
I am a very fast (but safe) driver and have already been caught twice even though I had a \'basic\' detector fitted, so I know they are a waste of money. Spending £500-600 is not a problem so I\'m probably going to go for one of the GPS ones with a subscription. I want to drive the way I like, not the way the safety crew want me to\".

Putting the above post of yours together with your comments earlier in this thread, I think most people can gather that when they see you coming up behind them in your nice new BMW 320, by far the best course of action would be to pull over and let you get as far away as possible. I wouldn\'t want you anywhere near me judging by your comments here.

(As it happens, I think this is a wind up and you\'re actually a really decent thoughtful, careful, considerate individual).


KB.
Me-first driving - Morris Ox
I wouldn't call you arrogant. I'd call you CJ out of Reggie Perrin...
Me-first driving - Fireball XL5
Sorry, I dont know who CJ is. I have heard of the Reggie Perrin TV program but never seen it because it was a bit before my time.
Me-first driving - HF
Hmm well this has, I would imagine, now developed out of all proportion to the thread author's intentions.

There is one thing I would like to ask though, and which bothers me greatly.

Gen, you have expressed the fact that you feel it is ok to do 100mph plus on our motorways - and yet you also express horror at 100mph crashes in Australia and America?

I'm not sure that I can equate one with the other. Quite prepared to find that I have misread and that I am wrong - but, if I am not, can you ease my mind as to why you feel this way?

Me-first driving - Gen
HF

I never drive at 100 (which my car would struggle with anyway). As I tried to state my speed on motorways is invariably at a maximum 75-85. I personally would not feel safe at that speed. Nor would I risk my license for the minute time savings. However if someone decides to drive at that speed I don\'t see why they keep moving over to the inside lane as it is unlikely they will \'block\' other traffic in the second or third lane. I wasn\'t saying it was okay to do 100mph on our motorways, but don\'t feel able to judge people who do; it\'s not my business unless they affect my safety.

My 100mph crash comment was relating to the extremely large lorries and single carriageway so relating to two vehicles having a head-on at 50mph each. It is why I wouldn\'t drive fast on a single track, since many people don\'t take account if you hit another car coming the other way your combined speed is often double your speed. I had to deal with a crash with four americans in australia who hit a truck (wrong side of road out of motel/cafe, not put seatbelts on yet). Two dead, two very seriously injured. I don\'t know if you have seen an american or australian truck but if you have you will know what i mean by massive and destructive to hit.

I only have one life and it is valuable to me. As such I will save as much time as I can. On the other hand I won\'t drive so fast I\'m putting my life in danger.

Hope that explains my position
Me-first driving - HF
>>Hope that explains my position

Yes, it does - thank you.

I've never been to Australia or America, but I can imagine what you mean about their trucks. I would also hazard a guess that you'd get similar results in a combined 100mph crash with a lorry over here. Not nice.
HF
Me-first driving - Liverpaul
Looking through and reading with interest the comments on the whole of this thread, it is symptematic(sp?) of the English to queue at every opportunity. I go through a junction every day and it amuses me that either one of the lanes always has a longer queue than the other and it's not always the same lane. Both go straight on, and a majority of drivers move into the lane with more people already queuing in it - why?

I have always thought that on the issue of merging by roadworks that merge in turn is by far the best option. I remember this was trialled a while back, and alongside each sign stating distance to the roadworks was a further sign saying "stay in lane", and then within the last 50 yards arrows on the road and signs saying "merge in turn". Far better, ensures people don't try and stop you merging in and ensures the back of the hold up doesn't stretch so far back and causes less of a problem. This should be drummed into us and become standard practice.

As for drivers who sit in an overtaking lane and don't pull to the left when clear - they are the reason for many hold up's in this country. In effect a three lane road becomes 2 lanes when they sit in the middle and single lane when outside as no-one can pass. It is one part of driving ignorance and selfishness that really winds me up. I would like to see the police stopping all drivers who insist on doing that and charging them with driving without due care and attention, or a lack of consideration to other road users. That may then stop the practice happening and the associated hold ups caused by the drivers.

Paul.
Me-first driving - teabelly
I go through a junction every day and
it amuses me that either one of the lanes always has
a longer queue than the other and it's not always the
same lane. Both go straight on, and a majority of drivers
move into the lane with more people already queuing in it
- why?


It's probably some primative herding instinct :-) Plus if you go in the second lane and you don't know the area it is possible that at the other side of the junction there is a merge point where the two lanes turn into one. If you know there isn't then the shortest lane is the one to go for. If the straight ahead right lane also has right turn on it and there are cars in front it is possible to end up being blocked by the traffic turning right.
As for drivers who sit in an overtaking lane and don't
pull to the left when clear - they are the reason
for many hold up's in this country. In effect a three
lane road becomes 2 lanes when they sit in the middle
and single lane when outside as no-one can pass. It is
one part of driving ignorance and selfishness that really winds me
up.


Some stick in one lane due to lack of confidence in lane changing on motorways. I assume some also think that if they are doing 70mph on the nose no-one should be wanting to come past them anyway and if they do they should move over to the outside lane to do it.

In busy situations it is often easier to pootle up the middle lane rather than either being sandwiched between the artics, bobbing and weaving in and out of the middle lane after overtaking each car (according to the highway code) or being bumper to bumper at 80mph in the outside lane. If I am sticking in the middle lane then I make sure I am passing traffic in the left hand lane as much as possible. If there is no one behind me then I may stick to the same speed as the left hand lane but adjacent to a gap. If someone comes up behind me then I will use the gap.


teabelly
Me-first driving - googolplex
I posted a thread similar to this about 6 months back and so I'll take this opportunity to restate my support for the "Merge in turn" crowd. My reasoning is simple: it stops anyone charging up the empty lane and queue jumping. Hopefully that then saves tempers flaring.
An interesting anecdote to add to this: Yesterday I was in this very situation going round the Coventry bypass: line of queuing traffic, empty lane, etc. So I thought "to hell with it" and shot up the empty lane until I met the obligatory van driver who straddled both lanes to stop queue jumpers whereupon I, and all the cars who chose to follow me, chugged along and merged in turn at the cones. The irony is that thereafter, the empty lane thing must have at least for the next few minutes been solved since everyone was merging at the cones and not 100s of yards beforehand. So well done that van driver whereever you are.

Splodgeface
Me-first driving - Hugo {P}
I am on the side of those HGVs and vans that choose to block the dying lane.

I find that the traffic in front of them does merge much more quietly and the general traffic flow is faster. In addition, if the obstruction is due to say, an accident, then I am sure that the Van/Lorry would pull over for the emergency vehicles, who would otherwise have to fight their way through the traffic shooting down and cloggin up the dying lane.

I agree with Hootie's point that just because someone has decided to shoot up the outside lane to get in front of the traffic, this should not give them the right to queue barge all those drivers waiting patiently. After all, if this happened at your local supermarket with trolleys, there would soon be a punch up!

I have to confess, that I do this myself - yes I know it draws attention to me but it really helps the flow of traffic and we all get to our destinations quicker - call me a self righteous prat if you want. However, once there was an ambulance coming up behind me in this position and after I pulled over, he was able to progress straight to the scene about 2 miles further up. Had I not done what I did, he would have to have fought both lanes full of traffic for 2 miles and he would have probably reached the scene 5 minutes later, 5 minuits can be the difference between life and death.

As I say call me a self righteous prat if you want.




--
Signature has been removed due to lack of interest!

Hugo
Me-first driving - jeds
Hugo, being so pre-occupied with where other cars are on the road is not good for you. I can absolutely assure you that driving is much more pleasant when you gain a security of not having to be concerned about whether another car is in front or wants to overtake etc. Just let them go. I was with a colleague recently who went purple with rage because the car in front of us let another car in when the lanes went down from 3 to 2 immediately after a set of traffic lights - not a roadwork it was just the road layout. There are 3 lanes and then there are 2 - somebody has to use the lane otherwise it would be empty for about 10 miles. Not everybody using it is going to know that the lanes reduce.

If you are prepared to obstruct traffic 2 miles away from a merge point I wonder why you choose that distance and not, say, another mile back? Or perhaps 4 or 5 miles back, or 10? I'm not being funny, I'm just trying to point out that your view of where the right point is might be slightly different to somebody else. What would you think if you suddenly found somebody imposing similar behaviour on you 10 miles from a roadwork?

I ask these questions but won't see any responses because I'm off to France and Switzerland tomorrow. (today)

I just wish more people would be less concerned with others and let those who want to pass get on with it. I think the roads would be a better place for it.
Me-first driving - Hugo {P}
Jeds

Food for thought I suppose.....

H
 

Value my car