Camera-cheating methods - Andrew-T

The other day I noticed a car joining from a slip-road whose rear plate unmistakably read SH11TTY. I momentarily thought 'that Scotsman doesn't love his car'. Might be accepted by the cameras, but I was not surprised to find that it has no MoT record. What - if anything - does 'the system' do when such cars are detected? There is no DVLA record, so no address to send anything or anyone to?

Camera-cheating methods - alan1302

Doubt there is much that can be done

Camera-cheating methods - daveyjp

ANPR is everywhere - a car can be followed almost anywhere in the Country by simply tracking the plate.

If the reg it isn't registered it may well already have been noticed and registered on the ANPR database and a stop may come at some point. However for that you need traffic police.

Camera-cheating methods - Bromptonaut

I don't think that mark would be allocated - rude words are usually barred.

So either it's a wholly false plate or, however unmistakeable, something has been rearranged. There is one round here that is 'unmistakeably' R1 FLE re-arranged to spell RIFLE. Only noticed difference when for some reason (MoT?) it was wearing a correctly spaced plate that it's actually B1 FLE with a strategically placed white screw.

If it's been re-arranged and camera cannot get an auto-read I'd expect it to be referred for resolution with human eyeball and intelligence. Driver may find he get's a NIP for number plate offences - the font/spacing rules are pretty prescriptive.

If it's a wholly false plate, particularly one that's repeatedly triggering cameras, then it'll be on a 'watch list' and will trigger ANPR. Police cars may not be as common as we'd like but there a enough for me to see two or three every week.

Camera-cheating methods - Andrew-T

I don't think that mark would be allocated - rude words are usually barred.

Many of us will recall the (very) old days with 6-letter regs, when WC and OO were excluded from the allocations to local authorities. Things got very tight in the late 50s so both those series were allocated to Essex, where presumably authority thought no-one would mind. It wasn't long before the A-suffix appeared, to make 7-character plates.

Camera-cheating methods - NARU

According to this, that numberplate was withdrawn/not issued.

www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-news/278123/Cheeky...d

Camera-cheating methods - Miniman777
Maybe SH11TTY is S411TTY with a carefully placed
screwhead.

I’ve no problem with personalised plates - have one myself on retention - but the fact the police do nothing to those who deliberately mis-space letters to spell names or whatever does annoy me.

Edited by Miniman777 on 07/08/2018 at 17:31

Camera-cheating methods - TheGentlemanThug

If a car with a suspicious plate is noticed on the same roads at the same time of the day then the police will probably pre-empt it and have a patrol in the area.

Camera-cheating methods - focussed

In the 90's when the cash-cams started to sprout everywhere I rode around on an ST1100 for a couple of years with a 3" diameter circular yellow smiley-face sticker on the rear number plate, obscuring part of the registration, some wag in the motorcycle club I was in stuck it on and I left it on.

All over the UK for about 20K miles - to and from Ireland, ferries, motorways etc.

Europe as well, France, Belgium Holland.

Never got stopped or questioned, including once being followed eastbound on the M4 by a traffic car for about 10 miles!

Camera-cheating methods - James2018

Funnily enough I was stopped yesterday on a 60MPH road.

Doing 58MPH accoring to my digital speedo at 11PM.

I was also the only car to indicate when passing a cyclist.

Unmarked police car lit up like a christmas tree.

Apparently my driving appeared odd because I wasn't going as fast as the cars passing me and they thought I might have been drunk!

No attempt to spot the cars speeding though!

Camera-cheating methods - Engineer Andy

Funnily enough I was stopped yesterday on a 60MPH road.

Doing 58MPH accoring to my digital speedo at 11PM.

I was also the only car to indicate when passing a cyclist.

Unmarked police car lit up like a christmas tree.

Apparently my driving appeared odd because I wasn't going as fast as the cars passing me and they thought I might have been drunk!

No attempt to spot the cars speeding though!

Oh the irony of the Police these days. I'd be temped to ask 'should I speed?' so they would know I'm not a drunk driver then...

Camera-cheating methods - SteveLee

If a car with a suspicious plate is noticed on the same roads at the same time of the day then the police will probably pre-empt it and have a patrol in the area.

Yeah right, I've received 15 NIPs so far this year with someone who cloned my OLD plate, including several incidences of doing 90+mph in a 30. The police aren't interested in catching actual criminals - that's far too difficult - they're more interested in collecting taxes from otherwise law-abiding citizens in the form of automated fines etc. As I've said before, if I won the lottery I'd be straight in court with the best brief in the world challenging ANPR based fines for what they are - circumstantial evidence backed only by focibly-engineered volunteered admissions of guilt - which, strictly speaking, are against the law.

My next visit to court would be to bankrupt the governement forcing them to pay back motorists every penny in VAT charged on fuel duty for the last 30 years. Duty does not have an actual market value (which is what VALUE added tax is supposed to be levied on) - 20% of nothing is nothing.

Camera-cheating methods - Andrew-T

Careful Steve, your chips are showing :-) It's because it's so hard to catch speeders that the ANPR cameras were installed - without them, no-one would be caught. And because of them, your plate has been cloned.

Chemists call it le Chatelier's Principle - disturb a system in equilibrium and it responds to restore the balance. In human terms, what I have described above. Cops responded, then so did the speeders.

Camera-cheating methods - SteveLee

Careful Steve, your chips are showing :-) It's because it's so hard to catch speeders that the ANPR cameras were installed - without them, no-one would be caught. And because of them, your plate has been cloned.

Chemists call it le Chatelier's Principle - disturb a system in equilibrium and it responds to restore the balance. In human terms, what I have described above. Cops responded, then so did the speeders.

Well, the only time I've ever been nicked for speeding was by a real copper back in the 90s (I saw him but he got me with VASCAR whilst braking) luckily the speed was "only" 93.7mph (3 points and a £60 fine) (94+ was a court appearance) done hundreds of thousands of miles since - and haven't been caught again despite plenty of speeding (where I deem it safe to do so.)

I changed my plate as soon as the first NIP hit the door mat a year ago - that means an untaxed, uninsured, unregistered number plate has been flyng about unabated since and all "the law" can do is illegaly persecute the previous owner of the 'plate. Is this the sort of service the law abiding motorist hands £40bn+ pa over for?

Camera-cheating methods - alan1302

Is this the sort of service the law abiding motorist hands £40bn+ pa over for?

You just said you speed when you deem it safe to do so...so you are not a law abiding motorist.

Camera-cheating methods - TheGentlemanThug
haven't been caught again despite plenty of speeding (where I deem it safe to do so.)

Is this the sort of service the law abiding motorist hands £40bn+ pa over for?

Where do I even start with that?!

Camera-cheating methods - FP

"... if I won the lottery I'd be straight in court with the best brief in the world challenging ANPR based fines for what they are - circumstantial evidence backed only by focibly-engineered volunteered admissions of guilt - which, strictly speaking, are against the law.

My next visit to court would be to bankrupt the governement forcing them to pay back motorists every penny in VAT charged on fuel duty for the last 30 years. Duty does not have an actual market value (which is what VALUE added tax is supposed to be levied on) - 20% of nothing is nothing."

ANPR fines - "circumstantial evidence" - if you mean fines as a result of speed camera use, then it's certainly not circumstantial evidence. Unless the camera has not been properly calibrated, it's good hard evidence.

You want to go to court to challenge the levy of VAT specifically on fuel duty (isn't VAT levied on the whole thing, which of course includes duty?)? Best of luck with that. Most rational people would rate your chance of success as zero. Mind you, the lawyers would be happy with you for pouring money into a hopeless cause.

All of the above, together with your statement in another post that you were once recorded driving at just under 94 mph and that you do "plenty of speeding (where I deem it safe to do so)" suggests that you have a real problem with authority and with obeying certain parts of motoring law.

Edited by FP on 10/08/2018 at 14:48

Camera-cheating methods - SteveLee
ANPR fines - "circumstantial evidence" - if you mean fines as a result of speed camera use, then it's certainly not circumstantial evidence. Unless the camera has not been properly calibrated, it's good hard evidence.

You want to go to court to challenge the levy of VAT specifically on fuel duty (isn't VAT levied on the whole thing, which of course includes duty?)? Best of luck with that. Most rational people would rate your chance of success as zero. Mind you, the lawyers would be happy with you for pouring money into a hopeless cause.

All of the above, together with your statement in another post that you were once recorded driving at just under 94 mph and that you do "plenty of speeding (where I deem it safe to do so)" suggests that you have a real problem with authority and with obeying certain parts of motoring law.

The circumstantial bit is relying on a numberplate that may be yours as the proof to advance a prosecution - there's no proof it's you until you admit to the offence (convictions based on confessions as the only source of evidence against you are illegal for obvious reasons), ANPR prosecutions are on shaky ground because they are made on the assumption that numberplate cloning does not happen when numberplate cloning is rife.

Sure, okay, the government should refund the VAT charged on the duty part of the cost of fuel.

Driving past a school with a posted limit of 30mph at, say, 20mph because the number of children about would mean it's prudent to slow down doesn't earn me any brownie points or a refund on my past speeding ticket - it's called me using my judgment, posted limits can be too high just as they can be too low - obeying a blanket speed limit in good conditions on a deserted motorway at 4 in the morning doesn't make you a good driver nor does going past a busy school at 30mph – you’re not breaking the law in the later example but you ARE driving badly. Good driving means observing what's going on around you and driving accordingly.

Camera-cheating methods - FP

"ANPR prosecutions are on shaky ground because they are made on the assumption that numberplate cloning does not happen when numberplate cloning is rife."

If you can prove your plate has been cloned I would have thought that is a good defence.

"Good driving means observing what's going on around you and driving accordingly."

It also means obeying the law. Otherwise you're in the position of the arrogant person who always knows better. Yes, of course the law is often a blunt instrument, but if we had no speed limits and left speeds to be determined by the driver, you and I know what would happen. Everyone who drove at 60 mph through a sleepy village could say they had used their best judgement that it was safe, even though an elderly resident didn't quite make it across the road from the village shop.

Camera-cheating methods - TheGentlemanThug
Good driving means observing what's going on around you and driving accordingly.

And doing so within the confines of the law.

 

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