Domestic - Gen
Someone want to settle this? Expert 'backseat driver' and I had a little errr yes...

Situation: Car parked on hill on the up way. Car driving up and one down same distance away from parked car. Inevitable problem, stopping in the middle. You get the picture.

So, should the person coming down the hill give way to the car coming up the hill (as should give way to the car climbing the hill,as a rule), or the car coming up the hill give way as car parked on its side (as person who has car parked on their side should give way, as a rule).

Not telling you which I was out of scientific methodology...
Domestic - waggy
.>> Someone want to settle this? Expert 'backseat driver' and I had
a little errr yes...
Situation: Car parked on hill on the up way. Car driving
up and one down same distance away from parked car. Inevitable
problem, stopping in the middle. You get the picture.
So, should the person coming down the hill give way to
the car coming up the hill (as should give way to
the car climbing the hill,as a rule), or the car coming
up the hill give way as car parked on its side
(as person who has car parked on their side should give
way, as a rule).
Not telling you which I was out of scientific methodology...

>>

Giving way to traffic going up hill is a relic from the days of horse drawn vehicles and is not relevent to modern vehicles IMHO

If parked car is on your side, give way
Domestic - SteveH42
I'd say it depends on the hill. If it's a fair slope then I'd still give way to cars going up as it's harder on their running gear having to do a hill start, and potentially dangerous to cars behind them if they muck it up. Less steep slopes I think you can go back to the 'who's side of the road' argument but again bear in mind that the driver coming up might prefer to assume right of way.
Domestic - Obsolete
I do as suggested by SteveH42. It seems to combine common sense and courtesy. However, round here you are lucky if someone gives way even when you clearly have priority.

Anyone else noticed that when you stop on a steep hill, at lights say, the car behind usually stops a few inches behind. I am flattered that these people have such confidence in my ability to do a hill start. I must be a good driver.
Domestic - JamesH
Whether going up or down it's probably best not to assume the other driver would give way to you!

A car being on my side of the road would make me more likely to give way more than whether there is a slope.

I would be more inclined (sorry about the pun) to give way to the car coming downhill. Gravity would make his stopping distance longer and mine shorter.

James
Domestic - HF
This leads me on to something that I've been wanting to mention for ages. I'm sorry it's not quite relevant here, but it's as close as I can find.

When driving along a street where there is *no* right of way, ie there are parked cars on both sides, and only one car can fit through the middle, I find all those drivers who just assume that you will give way to them really annoying.

Fine if you've pulled over or flashed, but those that carry on knowing that they will have a head-on with you if you don't do something quickly *do* get on my nerves.
HF
Domestic - Obsolete
Sadly driving is so often about keeping your eyes open and positioning yourself to take into account what someone daft or arrogant might do. That said, most drivers are fairly polite, and some especially so.
Domestic - Nsar
Legally, I'm not sure. Common sense wise, take control of the situation and give way, where the sense of creating a 50/50?
Domestic - terryb
Strangely, although I was taught it 35+ years ago, I can find nothing in the online Highway code about giving way if the obstruction is on your side. I did however find:

"The rules in The Highway Code do not give you the right of way in any circumstance, but they advise you when you should give way to others. Always give way if it can help to avoid an accident." which might cover it; and

"Single-track roads. These are only wide enough for one vehicle. They may have special passing places. If you see a vehicle coming towards you, or the driver behind wants to overtake, pull into a passing place on your left, or wait opposite a passing place on your right. Give way to vehicles coming uphill whenever you can. If necessary, reverse until you reach a passing place to let the other vehicle pass." which is the uphill bit, and the circumstances you describe turn the road into single track where the vehicle is parked.

So you pays your money and you takes your choice.

HTH, but I bet it doesn't!


Terry
Domestic - borasport20
Strangely, although I was taught it 35+ years ago, I can
find nothing in the online Highway code about giving way if
the obstruction is on your side.



Section 139 PARA 3
'Give way to oncoming vehicles before passing parked vehicles or other obstructinos on your side of the road'

Domestic - terryb
Oops! Thanks borasport. Missed that one! Although in the online version it's section 139 bullet point 6.

Love "obstructinos"! Sounds like Julian and Sandy for those who remember "Round the Horne" on Sunday lunchtimes!
;o)

Terry
Domestic - John R @ Work {P}
Gen,
Nowadays it seems to be dependant on the size of the vehicle.
"I'm BIGGER than you, therefore I have right of way."

Also having Private Hire plates, backward fitting baseball caps, glazzed expressions or the ostrich syndrome and the Magnus Magnuson drivers (I've started, so I'll finish!) seem to demand their rights [of way]... (whatever happened to responsibilities?)


(Apologies to members who may think I am having a go at them but who do not deserve it.)


John R
Domestic - Marcos{P}
We used to live up a very steep hill and generally the person coming down would always give way to the person coming up no matter what side of the road the parked cars were on.

Unfortunately you would always get the idiot who would start to come through when you were halfway up claiming it was his right of way, there's always one.
Domestic - CM
People say to give way to vehicles going up hill (from horse drawn days).

I was always led to believe the opposite and that youshould give way to vehicles coming down hill as it is easier to stop a vehicle going up hill than coming down. This is particularly the case in icy conditions.
Domestic - terryb
CM - so the highway code is wrong then??

Terry
Domestic - Gen
Okay, I'm going to jump off the fence...

In my view person going up hill priority. Though if you have a good car may not be trouble stopping and starting on the hill, little Mrs Smith down the road in her 950cc popular plus will spend the next half hour winding it up again.

Surely you would give way to a truck coming up the hill? If a truck, what about a transit? If a transit, what about a astra with two ladders and boot of tools? It would be hard to draw a line what will struggle so should be allowed a clear run up the hill. Therefore going up hill must be the overriding priority.

As to take longer to brake going down- perhaps true but must be going too fast in that case. Should anticipate and allow for the circumstances and rules of the road.
Domestic - drbe
Oh, and another thing..........
Imagine a conventional four way roundabout - right - let's call the approaches/exits 3o'clock, 6 o'clock, 9 o'clock and 12 o'clock, everybody ok so far?

As seems to be fairly typical round here (deep sarf) the approach is two lane, but the exit is one lane, now traffic approaching the roundabout, will keep to the left hand lane if intending to take the first exir. The traffic taking the third exit will use the right hand lne.

What do you do, (who has priority) if a vehicle is approaching from the six o'clock position and is intending to take the second exit (twelve o'clock) who has right of way when the road narrows to single lane? In other words which lane should you be in, the left lane, or the right lane?

Your thoughts would be appreciated.

Regards to all
Don drbe
Domestic - Orson {P}
Norwich has several of these. Rule seems to be choose whichever lane you like, and make sure you're quickest off the blocks! Quite silly, but the Norfolk drivers seem to manage it without too much mayhem, even for those whose knuckles drag on the floor whilst driving....

O
Domestic - SteveH42
I posed a similar query a while back and didn't really get a response. I was told when I was learning that unless told otherwise, left hand lane was for exits 1 and 2, right hand lane for exit 3. Someone commented that if exit 2 is past 'straight ahead' then this should be the right hand lane as well, but I'm not so sure about this.

As has been commented on elsewhere, here in Stockport some drivers tend to take a 'who dares wins' approach which has led to several very near misses.
Domestic - CM
CM - so the highway code is wrong then??
Terry



I have absolutely no idea as I haven't read it for about 15 years.

 

Value my car