n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - focussed

Yes - they are at it again - striking for more money. So if you are coming to France, probably not a good idea to arrive with a near empty tank.

You might be ok for a fill up, you might not, it depends where you go and what the local situation is - it's a bit hit and miss at the moment.

I'm running both of our vehicles with full tanks at the moment because I don't want to get caught out like I did last year.

www.thelocal.fr/20170526/fuel-driver-strike-could-...s

and

www.ouest-france.fr/economie/transports/penurie-de...7

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - SLO76
Good. Every strike makes France a less appealing destination for investment and job creation. Their wealth and job creators are more than welcome here. In fact London is now Frances unofficial 6th largest city thanks to all the idiotic socialist militancy and anti-wealth policies. Pity as it's a beautiful country and I've had several very enjoyable visits.
n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - Stanb Sevento

Yes they are fond of a good strike in France, are they blocking the roads yet, thats the next step.

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - Ethan Edwards

But they prefer to torch British trucks carrying live Sheep.

Lovely people.

Roll on August with the Traditional Annual Spanish Air Traffic Controllers and the French Baggage Handlers strikes. Yeah we need to be part of that ...NOT!

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - Engineer Andy
Good. Every strike makes France a less appealing destination for investment and job creation. Their wealth and job creators are more than welcome here. In fact London is now Frances unofficial 6th largest city thanks to all the idiotic socialist militancy and anti-wealth policies. Pity as it's a beautiful country and I've had several very enjoyable visits.

Sadly, if the polls are to be believed (see today's DT), this is the sort of thing we should expect after next Thursday if things go the way they're going. If it did, I would be ashamed to call myself British (especially after what we sensibly decided to do last year) and would like look to move abroad to Canada, NZ or Australia, as they'd be nothing left worth saving after 5 years, ending up like Greece or Venezuela, far worse than France is currently.

If the people are naive to believe the socialists' lies, then they deserve everything (as France does) they get, and I'm not gonna bail them out. Its like half the population of this country are blind or stupid, despite seeing what is going on the other side of the Channel, in Greece or in South America. We haven't even started to pay back the £2Tn we owe and the want to borrow £50 a year more and tax business owners until they close or move abroad. And I though the French were stupid...

Edited by Engineer Andy on 31/05/2017 at 09:09

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - SLO76
Sadly Andy the public are very susceptible to bribery politics particularly the young and unless we teach future generations to understand how wealth is generated instead of leaving them to believe in the magic money tree the left will continue to have huge amount of power.
n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - Engineer Andy
Sadly Andy the public are very susceptible to bribery politics particularly the young and unless we teach future generations to understand how wealth is generated instead of leaving them to believe in the magic money tree the left will continue to have huge amount of power.

Indeed - its even more amazing that, after just 2 years (following Miliband being heckled by a studio audience for saying he didn't think Labour had 'spent too much' from 1997-2010) and not paying one penny back of our debt, only bring down the extra we owe after paying for everything and servicing that debt to 'just' £50Bn, they feel its a good idea just as we're about to go through a very difficult (but necessary) period with the EU that we should max out our credit card, whilst soaking business owners and directors who's jobs and investments (for smaller businesse, at their own financial risk I hasten to add) we depend on for our livelihoods.

Paddy Ashdown yesterday rubbished the idea that to many, it feels like the 1930s all over again, but I think they are right, especially after the disgusting anti-semitic trolling of that BBC Women's Hour jounro by Corbyn supporters, despite him saying on many occasions in the past that he would never 'put up with that' - in my view, just like with his terrorist-supporting friends, his weak 'comdemnations' and lack of action to put a stop to them are as credible as his economic and Brexit negotiation policies. French lorry strikes are the least of our problems, but a portent of things to come.

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - craig-pd130

Indeed - its even more amazing that, after just 2 years (following Miliband being heckled by a studio audience for saying he didn't think Labour had 'spent too much' from 1997-2010) and not paying one penny back of our debt, only bring down the extra we owe after paying for everything and servicing that debt to 'just' £50Bn,

And the deficit reduction's been going just great under the coalition & Conservative policies since 2010, hasn't it?

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - SLO76
"And the deficit reduction's been going just great under the coalition & Conservative policies since 2010, hasn't it?"

The Government borrowed £52bn in the last financial year, a fall of £20bn compared to the year before, this amounts to 2.6pc of GDP, the lowest level of borrowing since 2007-08.

Yes it's taken longer to turn the deficit into the surplus we should be running in normal economic conditions but they did have a massive global recession to manage too so slashing public sector spending immediately wasn't an option.

If anything they are guilty of promising too much (what politician doesn't) but every other party was (and still are) advocating spending far more and Labour ran an ever increasing deficit even during the boom years post Major government.

I'd say the Tories are by far the most responsible party in government. Labour while funded largely by the large public sector trade unions simply cannot be expected to act properly with regard to the nations finances. This is a simple truth that has been proven every time Labour get their hands on the keys to no 10.

Edited by SLO76 on 01/06/2017 at 16:49

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - craig-pd130
The Government borrowed £52bn in the last financial year, a fall of £20bn compared to the year before, this amounts to 2.6pc of GDP, the lowest level of borrowing since 2007-08.

Yes it's taken longer to turn the deficit into the surplus we should be running in normal economic conditions but they did have a massive global recession to manage too so slashing public sector spending immediately wasn't an option.

Labour actually managed the first two and a half years of that global recession pretty well, and cushioned the economy from much of the fall-out.

The Conservative party would have managed no better following the events of 2007/8 as these were the result of slack regulation of the banking / financial sector - events set in train in the 80s under Conservative governments and (to Labour's shame) not addressed under Blair or Brown. Osborne's accusation of Labour over-borrowing is also false, given the global nature of the recession. Every Western country was exposed.

His policies over the following 6 years also proved to be fiscally disastrous, nearly doubling the deficit rather than reducing it. Even the reductions in borrowing under Hammond are only making minor inroads into the damage Osborne inflicted. Austerity has not worked as an economic tool in terms of deficit reduction or growth.

Also, the Conservative party's so-called 'fix' for the economy is based on the old chestnuts of 'getting the housing market moving' and cheap money - in other words, the situation in early 2007 all over again, together with an excessively high stock market.

There's zero wages growth, incomes are falling in real terms, the NHS is suffering death by 1000 cuts, the economy is stagnant despite the QE efforts from the Bank of England. One term of coalition government (largely led by Conserative interests) and half of another term under full Conservative governance, has given me no confidence whatsoever in the Conservative party's financial responsibility.

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - SLO76

"Labour actually managed the first two and a half years of that global recession pretty well, and cushioned the economy from much of the fall-out."


Brown did the right thing by increasing state spending to cushion the real economy during a global recession. The criticism comes from the fact that he should have been running a surplus for pretty much the full three terms they were in office. Ask any economist worth their salt and they'll agree that deficit spending should not be the norm. If healthy economic conditions prevail then we should run a surplus in preparation for the next downturn. Labour did not do this. With the big public sector unions funding the party they're not free to set sensible economic policy.


"Osborne's accusation of Labour over-borrowing is also false, given the global nature of the recession. Every Western country was exposed."

Had Labour carried on with the Major governments spending plans past the first two years we would've been in surplus for almost a decade before the crisis hit. I agree totally that a Tory government would've done little to avoid it (though Brown did relax banking regulations soon after entering office) but they would have been better placed to properly stimulate the economy without spooking sovereign debt markets.


"His policies over the following 6 years also proved to be fiscally disastrous, nearly doubling the deficit rather than reducing it. Even the reductions in borrowing under Hammond are only making minor inroads into the damage Osborne inflicted. Austerity has not worked as an economic tool in terms of deficit reduction or growth."

As is all to often the case with voters in the U.K. you have deficit and debt mixed up. Of course the debt would continue to rise as we inherited a massive annual spending deficit (10.2% of GDP in 09-10) therefore the debt would not begin to reduce until this became a surplus. It's currently forecast to be 2.2% of GDP this year, a massive decrease. As for growth well we have outgrown all of our European peers, in particular those who chose to ignore reality and carry on taxing and spending as if this would lead to prosperity. No nation in the history of the planet has managed to tax its way to prosperity.

"Also, the Conservative party's so-called 'fix' for the economy is based on the old chestnuts of 'getting the housing market moving' and cheap money - in other words, the situation in early 2007 all over again, together with an excessively high stock market."

Free market capitalism is cyclical. There will always be boom and there will always be bust, the trick is to prepare for the downturn by having public finances in rude health beforehand which would allow for effective short term stimulus spending.

"the NHS is suffering death by 1000 cuts"

A common lie from the left oft publicised by the NHS trade unions for obvious reasons. The truth is NHS funding is at a historical high, over £10b more than the peak under Labour. What is upsetting the unions is that the Tories are demanding more efficiency and more modern working practices while Labour were happy just to throw money at it without any care as to how it was spent. Much of the growth in NHS funding under Labour was wasted in increased admin/management staff and inflation busting pay rises for their union backers.

Edited by SLO76 on 02/06/2017 at 01:12

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - Engineer Andy

Agreed - the main problems during Labour's terms in office between 1997 - 2010, other than running a deficit when they should've been running a surplus, was their poor negotiating skills and a propensity for Brown to keep borrowing on an industrial scale off the official books:

Giving the GPs their opening offer on pay and conditions, far more than they deserved, including the disasterous opting out of out-of-hours care, which, combined with subsidising many women to become doctors, now have a shortage of them because so many take career break when they have children, costing the NHS a fortune in training up new staff and providing part time/temp cover when they return (far more than if they were working full time throughout). Temp cover is now used by many staff to earn more money (across the board in the professional side of things) even when there's no need - its just that they can get away with it because the managers let them.

The VERY bad PFI contracts that were a licence to print money for the firms (often foreign ones) who were bidding to provide the funding for the building of new hospitals. It was bad enough that through incompetent management of the building projects (inter-departmental turf wars and politics causing several un-needed redesigns, endless project delays and buildings quite often not fit for purpose) that most went over budget by between 50 - 100%, but then the terms of the funding were so poorly negotiated that even then with high government day-to-day funding in 'good times' (really bought on credit, including government), most NHS Trusts were only just coping or running a deficit BACK THEN.

There was never any incentive to work more efficiently/smarter, only to endlessly throw more money at the problem, until, of course, it ran out after the financial collapse, when as you say, the lack of sens in the spending plans in previous years meant that the government in 2008 had to start borrowing on an industrial scale, and we're only now slowly getting back (not quick enough for me) to weening ourselves off it, still borrowing £50Bn and paying another similar amount in debt repayments. This is partly due to the current government's (and especially beholden from 2010 - 15 to the Lib Dems) reluctance to force the Public Sector to become more efficient (the only way the management think of doing so is by cutting front line staff, not in their own ranks and changing behaviour).

Back to France - which has a lot going for it, compared to the UK - a huge land mass that is conducive to agriculture, can easily accommodate its population (similar to ours in size) and an efficient road and rail network (no need to keep swerving to avoid towns and hills all the time), as well as a ready and easily-accessible market for its goods without having to use ships, planes or expensive tunnels, as well as a long and distinguished history (before the World Wars anyway) of scientific, culinary and cultrual areas.

And yet, in just 100 years, they've slowly sent their country on the path to ruination through their achilles heel - the French ego and unwillingness to accept they may be wrong and change is necessary to survive and thrive. The actions described by the OP shows how backward-looking they are (we shouldn't forget the past, but neither should we just blindly live in it), and a good guide to the voting public here next week to listen to our heads, not our hearts when placing their cross at the ballot box.

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - craig-pd130
"Labour actually managed the first two and a half years of that global recession pretty well, and cushioned the economy from much of the fall-out." Brown did the right thing by increasing state spending to cushion the real economy during a global recession. The criticism comes from the fact that he should have been running a surplus for pretty much the full three terms they were in office. Ask any economist worth their salt and they'll agree that deficit spending should not be the norm. If healthy economic conditions prevail then we should run a surplus in preparation for the next downturn. Labour did not do this. With the big public sector unions funding the party they're not free to set sensible economic policy. "Osborne's accusation of Labour over-borrowing is also false, given the global nature of the recession. Every Western country was exposed." Had Labour carried on with the Major governments spending plans past the first two years we would've been in surplus for almost a decade before the crisis hit. I agree totally that a Tory government would've done little to avoid it (though Brown did relax banking regulations soon after entering office) but they would have been better placed to properly stimulate the economy without spooking sovereign debt markets. "His policies over the following 6 years also proved to be fiscally disastrous, nearly doubling the deficit rather than reducing it. Even the reductions in borrowing under Hammond are only making minor inroads into the damage Osborne inflicted. Austerity has not worked as an economic tool in terms of deficit reduction or growth." As is all to often the case with voters in the U.K. you have deficit and debt mixed up. Of course the debt would continue to rise as we inherited a massive annual spending deficit (10.2% of GDP in 09-10) therefore the debt would not begin to reduce until this became a surplus. It's currently forecast to be 2.2% of GDP this year, a massive decrease. As for growth well we have outgrown all of our European peers, in particular those who chose to ignore reality and carry on taxing and spending as if this would lead to prosperity. No nation in the history of the planet has managed to tax its way to prosperity. "Also, the Conservative party's so-called 'fix' for the economy is based on the old chestnuts of 'getting the housing market moving' and cheap money - in other words, the situation in early 2007 all over again, together with an excessively high stock market." Free market capitalism is cyclical. There will always be boom and there will always be bust, the trick is to prepare for the downturn by having public finances in rude health beforehand which would allow for effective short term stimulus spending. "the NHS is suffering death by 1000 cuts" A common lie from the left oft publicised by the NHS trade unions for obvious reasons. The truth is NHS funding is at a historical high, over £10b more than the peak under Labour. What is upsetting the unions is that the Tories are demanding more efficiency and more modern working practices while Labour were happy just to throw money at it without any care as to how it was spent. Much of the growth in NHS funding under Labour was wasted in increased admin/management staff and inflation busting pay rises for their union backers.

I'm talking deficit, as you were originally, not debt. The deficit grew significantly under Osborne's chancellorship, despite his promises and as a direct result of his policies.

And 'prosperity' deserves defining. With zero wages growth, real incomes are falling, and personal debt is rising. As I mentioned, the stock market is currently at an inflated high, pumped up by cheap money. It's a house of cards.

Also, yes, NHS funding is at an all-time high. It needs to be, because of a growing, ageing population. The funding is not keeping pace with health and care needs - which is not just a Left / unionist opinion. And delivering healthcare is not a process that lends itself to 'efficiency'. Private healthcare providers can manage to be efficient by simply picking and choosing the conditions they treat. The NHS does not, and should not, have that choice.

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - Engineer Andy

I'm talking deficit, as you were originally, not debt. The deficit grew significantly under Osborne's chancellorship, despite his promises and as a direct result of his policies.

And 'prosperity' deserves defining. With zero wages growth, real incomes are falling, and personal debt is rising. As I mentioned, the stock market is currently at an inflated high, pumped up by cheap money. It's a house of cards.

Also, yes, NHS funding is at an all-time high. It needs to be, because of a growing, ageing population. The funding is not keeping pace with health and care needs - which is not just a Left / unionist opinion. And delivering healthcare is not a process that lends itself to 'efficiency'. Private healthcare providers can manage to be efficient by simply picking and choosing the conditions they treat. The NHS does not, and should not, have that choice.

The deficit grew because voters were still addicted to NuLab spending (bad) habits and Cameron thought he could only get in in any way by committing to carry through some, especially when a hung parliament meant he had to comrpomise with the Lib Dems to get them on board. The 2015 GE was conducted by them on the basis that within reason, a similar outcome to 2010 would be likely, not the outright win they achieved, so had to keep much of the policies intact even though they wanted (as we've seen now with the discarding of the 'triple lock' and means-testing the winter fuel allowance) to keep the Lib Dems on side, in case another coallition government was required.

Current polling today still shows that a good portion of the electorate is still peruaded by left-of-centre bribes with their and future generations' money, and especially concerning the young and old, both of whom do not directly contribute anywhere near as much to the government coffers as those of working age.

In my view, too many young people go to 'university' on Mickey Mouse courses (I'm talking 25% or more of all young people, i.e. half of those going to college), wasting their time and tens of thousands of £s on tuition fees and living costs (and booze, mobile phones,cars etc[none of which I needed at uni]) when they SHOULD be learning on the job doing work in line with their actual skills, but earning, saving and having no debts to service, as well learning a set of skills and contributing to the government and council coffers. I see all to often so-called 'graduates' demanding £30k+ on leaving 'college' who are barely any better than a 16yo trainee on half the salary (living at home to save money), coming to firms with bad habits (often a reliance too much on PCs) and a poor grasp of the technical skills they need to work successfully.

At the other end of the age scale, and despite us as a nation living on average 10-15 years longer (and in better health in our 60s and 70s) than 30-40 years ago, the 'pensionable age' hasn't increased for men at all, and has only caught up to the mens' for women (it still mystifies me why it wasn't the other way round to start with, given that women have always lived longer than men, who tended to die earlier due to more physically stressful jobs and higher levels of smoking), therefore pensions and benefits like the winter fuel allowance are paid for far longer than was the case 40 years ago, probably for double the time.

The pensionable age should ALREADY be well into the 70s, and to be honest working for a few extra years SHOULD be encouraged, as it promotes good health by being active - my Dad's health suddnely dropped after he formally retired (and not the reason why he did) because he was far less active, both in body and mind. I've noticed this of other retirees of a similar age (between 65 - 70 or so) and even in myself when unemployed - keeping busy and active (you don't have to do a stressful job) makes you healthier and live longer. Doing so can also benefit everyone, not just by your extra taxation and NI (if the retirement age increased) contributions, but would (including having less young people at uni) reduce the need for immigrant workers via use of part time, but highly trained staff to assist mainstream staff in firms and public services, and to give less experienced staff the benefit of their wisdom and experience/knowledge.

This, coupled with high quality public service campigns on personal health (obescity, alcoholism, etc etc) and fair rationing of health services to benefit those trying to take to be responsible and care of themselves would, with the above meansures, significantly reduce the strain on the NHS and care services, due to lower rates of health problems (including dementia) as well as infrastructure and transport due to far lower immigration rates, which could be better managed (if needed) over a long period, which doesn't happen now - they're always playing catchup.

The right-of-centre parties try at least (not always succeeding) to help people help themselves, to relieve the burden on everyone and encourage self-reliance and of communities, whereas the left-of-centre ones encourage depenedence on the state, and spending money inefficiently and for political reasons (often to shore up support within the public sector and depenednt groups), trying to treat the symptoms of problems rather than the root cause, which in the long run never works.

To answer your last point, the publci sector rarely takes notice of the best that the private sector does, which is why they are doomed to repeat the failures of the past. The private sector (health or otherwise) has to learn from mistakes and improve, because there's almways some competition that will and take their business away, something the public sector never has to deal with. If staff (especially senior ones and management) were actually in fear of losing their jobs because of doing a bad job, rather than getting a slap on the wrist and/or a paid-for transfer or nothing, then the quality services might improve.

Quite often, the NHS now sends patients to private hospitals because the treatment is of a better standard AND cheaper (because they work better and more efficiently, and are looking out for the customer [the patient] in order to get more business, whereas the public sector often looks out for the provider, both of which I have seen and experienced first hand and with friends, relatives and work colleagues). They often don't realise they're doing so, it so ingrained in the way they work.

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - SLO76
"I'm talking deficit, as you were originally, not debt. The deficit grew significantly under Osborne's chancellorship, despite his promises and as a direct result of his policies."


Craig. You are getting deficit and debt mixed up! The deficit has reduced from £151.7bn (9.9% of GDP) in 09-10 (Labours last year in government) to £52bn (2.6% of GDP) in the last financial year. The current chancellor Philip Hammond has reduced the rate of reduction in spending compared to Osborne (largely because of Brexit) so the deficit will unfortunately last into the early 2020's at the earliest before the national debt starts to reduce.

The debt rose sharply but again they inherited that massive budget deficit of almost £152bn. Are you suggesting they should've slashed public spending by at least this figure from year one at the height of a global recession?? I'm concerned at your lack of economic understanding. You really need to look into this before voting.

I will agree that the NHS funding despite being at a historic high doesn't go as far as it did but this is down to the uncontrolled immigration caused by flawed EU policy and Labours wholesale endorsement of it.

Edited by SLO76 on 02/06/2017 at 15:36

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - Big John

Yes - they are at it again - striking for more money. So if you are coming to France, probably not a good idea to arrive with a near empty tank.

Thanks for the warning - nearly got caught out last year. Fortunately I was just OK as I have a petrol car - it was diesel that was being "restricted". I'm off to France in a few weeks - will set off with a full tank this time!

That reminds me - must prepare headlights, fit Crit'Air sticker and mount new replacement Sanef widget

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - concrete

I too am visiting France in June/July and will set off with a full tank. I don't understand the French though. Living in the Utopian paradise that is the EU they should be so happy and carefree, why do they need to strike? Is it frustration that they haven't got a Corbyn to look after them? The socialist agenda which now makes employing anyone in France such a grave risk is not doing them any favours at all. Considering a fair proportion voted for other parties that are Eurosceptical I suspect the answer lies in a deep disatisfaction with the current status quo! There could be trouble ahead!! Cheers Concrete

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - sandy56

The French are more independent and more free thinking than the UK.

They defend their rights and dont just roll over and accept it like the UK.

Good for them! Vive La France

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - SLO76

The French are more independent and more free thinking than the UK.

They defend their rights and dont just roll over and accept it like the UK.

Good for them! Vive La France

Yet they vote for big state, high tax, high interference socialist governments on mass. I had a small group of French friends for a while when they were working up here and one thing I do admire is their ability to argue and debate politics without falling out with each other. Sadly Brits, especially Scots have a long way to go here.
n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - gordonbennet

Indeed they've just voted their very own merkel poodle in, and losing control of vast swathes of their cities, Paris in particular, free thinking gone walkabout.

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - focussed

All I can say is that I have lived in France, (well ok not France proper as I live in Brittany with the slightly mad Bretons) for eight years this year and everything just seems to work better than the UK.

(The true Bretons do not consider themselves French, they say that France only starts south of the River Loire)

I haven't been back to the UK for two years and the longer I stay here, the less I want to go back to the UK even for a visit.

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - SLO76
I've covered a fair mileage in France and I love the place. Lovely scenery, great food, gorgeous architecture, town centres still filled with a huge variety of quality small shops, stunning birds, better roads and disciplined divers.

Their economy however is in terminal decline. Over unionised, over taxed and over governed. They're living in the past still believing that state subsidy creates efficient wealth generation. PSA for example were recently bailed out by the Chinese because of daft employment laws which wouldn't let the firm downsize when global demand collapsed, Renault would've been the same had they not wisely spit their eggs between Nissan, Dacia, Lada and now Mitsubishi to give them the capacity to build abroad in more competitive climates. The parent company is struggling to remain relevant and has drastically reduced their range in most markets outside France.

France without change is doomed economically to spiral downwards with anti-wealth, anti-competition and anti-free market political thinking that makes it highly unattractive for foreign investors. The attract a fraction of what the UK does. The only reason the Chinese firm Dongfeng invested in PSA is because it was effectively a fire sale and had to be backed by a similar investment from French tax payers. The firms technology cheaply sold will be used to further advance China's car industry with an eye to eventually flooding Europe. There's little likelihood they'll fund mass production in costly France in the longterm.

The UK by comparison attracts almost double the inward investment France does, is one of the top 5 nations for business while France is listed at 26th just behind Latvia and we also have huge growth in our motor industry with exports at an all time high.


www.forbes.com/best-countries-for-business/list/

www.honestjohn.co.uk/news/miscellaneous/2017-04/br.../

www.rac.co.uk/drive/news/motoring-news/thriving-uk.../

Edited by SLO76 on 01/06/2017 at 22:55

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - sandy56

Yes and that is why we have millions of people on zero hour contracs earning a pittance, why people can no longer to afford to buy their own home, and have to flat share or live with their parents, and where foreign companies earn big profits from what was our water, our power supplies, our railways.

I dont see the French falling over themselves to sell out the family silver to foreign money. They stil seem to have some belief in their own country that seems very lacking in the UK.

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - SLO76

Yes and that is why we have millions of people on zero hour contracs earning a pittance, why people can no longer to afford to buy their own home, and have to flat share or live with their parents, and where foreign companies earn big profits from what was our water, our power supplies, our railways.

I dont see the French falling over themselves to sell out the family silver to foreign money. They stil seem to have some belief in their own country that seems very lacking in the UK.

Zero hour contracts are a tool to get largely younger people into work. It gives an employer a chance to properly assess them and to retain them with a proper contract if they work well. Yes some abuse the more relaxed regulations we have but even with that it gives said young person a start, some experience and a reference with which to move on to a better job. It worked for me. I started on a pittance an apprentice electrician, with a second job stacking shelves in a supermarket but by the time I was 19 I was a senior car salesman on a good wage with a company car then by 22 I was self employed and earning more than most graduates do by the time they're 50. I have no qualifications, just a dose of common sense and a decent work ethic. As for comparing France to the U.K. again well our unemployment rate is currently 4.8% while France's is more than double at 9.7% and youth unemployment in France is 23.7% compared to 13.3% here. Mentioning profit as if it's an evil term is daft. Profit is required to fund everything, from the services we use funded by taxes on profits to investment these firms make in our infrastructure. It all relies on that nasty word profit. The idea of selling off the utilities was so that the trade union stranglehold was broken and to remove political interference which only served to damage not improve them. Today a strike at one power firm can't bring the country to its knees as it could and did in the 70's as there are others to fill the void.
n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - Engineer Andy
Their economy however is in terminal decline. Over unionised, over taxed and over governed. They're living in the past still believing that state subsidy creates efficient wealth generation. PSA for example were recently bailed out by the Chinese because of daft employment laws which wouldn't let the firm downsize when global demand collapsed, Renault would've been the same had they not wisely spit their eggs between Nissan, Dacia, Lada and now Mitsubishi to give them the capacity to build abroad in more competitive climates. The parent company is struggling to remain relevant and has drastically reduced their range in most markets outside France.
France without change is doomed economically to spiral downwards with anti-wealth, anti-competition and anti-free market political thinking that makes it highly unattractive for foreign investors. The attract a fraction of what the UK does. The only reason the Chinese firm Dongfeng invested in PSA is because it was effectively a fire sale and had to be backed by a similar investment from French tax payers. The firms technology cheaply sold will be used to further advance China's car industry with an eye to eventually flooding Europe. There's little likelihood they'll fund mass production in costly France in the longterm. The UK by comparison attracts almost double the inward investment France does, is one of the top 5 nations for business while France is listed at 26th just behind Latvia and we also have huge growth in our motor industry with exports at an all time high.

The French situation sounds like the exact sort of policy direction Labour wants to go down - defiant to the last, believing (like King Canute) everyone else is wrong and they're right, despite all the evidence to the contrary, just because they have an arrogant belief that they cannot admit is not right because of such a big ego (which the French top brass have in spades).

That's why their unionised lorry drivers & industrial workers and militant farmers, rather than first looking to themselves to see if they are partially the cause of their problems and to work better, they blame everyone else (mainly foreigners, even Brits who have bothered to keep with the times and become more efficient [except our similar Public Sector]) and run the country into the ground whilst their governmnet weakly submits to their will, subsidising the downfall with unrealistically-high wages, working hours and perks whilst orders disappear to other countries, including our own.

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - Theophilus

Moving on from the political posturing ... back to the alert that Brits coming to France should be aware of the fuel situation - the number of fuel stations running empty is increasing, and spreading more generally across France:
www.connexionfrance.com/French-news/Almost-900-ser...s

n/a - Tanker drivers striking in France - again. - focussed

Moving on from the political posturing ... back to the alert that Brits coming to France should be aware of the fuel situation - the number of fuel stations running empty is increasing, and spreading more generally across France:
www.connexionfrance.com/French-news/Almost-900-ser...s

Au contraire un peu - the dispute is supposed to be over - but the distribution lag remains.

The law which prohibits heavy transport (tankers) from using the roads over weekends and holidays has been suspended over this coming long weekend, (monday is a holiday in france) to allow fuel to get to the filling stations.

We have some friends arriving Tuesday morning on the St Malo ferry and we will advise them not to arrive with low fuel - just in case.

I'll get back to taking some of the comments about france to task when I have a bit more time.

 

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