Review: Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe (2017)

Rating:

Very refined, plenty of space for a coupe, almost as good as an S-Class Coupe for half the price, brilliant base model diesel engine, lovely looks, beautiful cabin.

Pricey – especially with options, tall folk will still feel cramped in the back, not as sharp or dramatic as a BMW 6 Series, E 300 petrol doesn’t sound great.

Recently Added To This Review

22 August 2018 Mercedes-Benz E 450 4Matic announced

The six-cylinder petrol engine previously used in the CLS replaces the E 400 in the E-Class Coupe and Cabriolet line-ups. It uses a 48-volt mild hybrid system to provide a boost of 22PS and 250Nm of... Read more

31 May 2018 Mercedes-AMG E 53 4Matic+ Coupe goes on sale

Priced at £62,835, it has a 3.0-litre biturbo in-line six cylinder petrol engine, with the brand’s innovative new EQ Boost technology. It can generate 435PS and 520Nm, with an additional... Read more

20 May 2018

Received word of new E400d in-line 6-cylinder diesel engine being introduced to replace the 3.0 litre V6 diesel. Possibly to locate the DPF closer to the combustion chambers, making it more efficient.... Read more

Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe (2017): At A Glance

Mercedes-Benz has really found its mojo with its current generation of cars, never more so than with the four-door E-Class, a sensational slice of executive saloon. And so, with the E-Class Coupe subtracting two doors in exchange for additional style, the sum is one exceptional executive sports car. The end.

Or so you’d think. The E-Class Coupe does indeed share most of what’s great about the saloon (and the Estate) – beautiful cabin, fantastic refinement, lovely looks and one of the great four-cylinder diesel engines – but it’s somehow just not that exciting. For a coupe, that’s a problem.  

That’s because where a BMW 6 Series – it’s closest natural rival – feels low slung and dramatic and sharp to drive, the E-Class Coupe by comparison feels low key. Subdued. If that’s your bag, and you’re in the market for a slightly space-compromised executive runabout, then this will definitely satisfy you. Just don’t expect fireworks. 

That said, it’s still brilliant by most measures and, as per the saloon, it’s at the bottom of the range that the E-Class Coupe shines most. A basic E 220 d 4Matic has far more quiet refinement than a four-cylinder diesel has any right to. It’s not quick (0-62mph in 7.4 seconds), but it’s quick enough, and it’s the sort of car that skews your mood towards driving nice and gently anyway. 

The latest two-door E-Class is longer, wider and taller than the car it replaces. The result is more rear headroom, more shoulder room and more knee room. In fact, the E-Class Coupe’s rear space feels more substantial than the S-Class Coupe’s, though it’s still not a place tall adults will want to spend much time. 

Three engine choices are available  - a 194PS four-cylinder diesel in the E 220 d, a 245PS four-cylinder turbo petrol in the E 300 and a 333PS E 400 4MATIC, powered by a six-cylinder twin-turbo petrol and with four-wheel drive. All come with a nine-speed automatic gearbox – and a very unobtrusive, smooth shifting one at that, despite all those ratios.  

Standard equipment is generous, including 19-inch alloys, LED headlights, heated font seats, Artico upholstery (which is Mercedes-Benz’s fake leather stuff), parking sensors, a reversing camera, full-HD infotainment and dual zone climate control. 

What does a Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe (2017) cost?

List Price from £36,075
Buy new from £28,352
Contract hire from £307.36 per month
Get a finance quote with CarMoney

Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe (2017): What's It Like Inside?

Dimensions
Length 4846–4848 mm
Width 2055–2065 mm
Height 1427–1438 mm
Wheelbase 2873 mm

Full specifications

As per the driving experience, the E-Class Coupe’s interior is fundamentally excellent but is at its best when furnished with high-cost options.

A basic Coupe gets Mercedes-Benz’s Artico vinyl stuff, a fairly substantial (8.4-inch) infotainment screen, navigation, Bluetooth, DAB, climate control and a few other trinkets that make it feel executive – but to take it to luxury car level requires a significant spend. 

For example, a mere £4000 will buy you the ‘Premium Plus’ package, which will, among other things, mean you don’t have to press a button on the key fob to unlock the car (there's a proximity sensor), don’t have to readjust the driving position after your taller/shorter partner has been driving (memory seats) and can see all the bird poo on the roof without leaving the car (panoramic sunroof). You’ll get a mega 13-speaker Burmeister stereo too. 

A further £800 buys you rear heated seats and warm elbows – heated arm rests in the door and centre console. Another £600 will equip your car with automatic lane keeping on the motorway; £1700 will buy you a ‘Driving Assistance’ pack, which includes radar cruise control and a system that slows the car down automatically if the speed limit changes; £1500 makes the infotainment screen four inches bigger, and for a further £500 you can have another one in place of the traditional instrument binnacle. 

You get the picture: it’s possible to turn your four-cylinder diesel two-door into a near-autonomous tech fest, but one with an eye watering list price, only a fraction of which you’ll recover when you come to sell it. Assuming yours isn’t a company car, which it probably is. 

Regardless, the fundamentals of the E-Class Coupe’s cabin are almost beyond reproach. It has more interior space than the bigger S-Class Coupe, and and the cabin design is, to our eyes, neater and better resolved. And its quality is near enough the same too, while there’s a wide selection of colours and wood trims to suit most tastes. 

Being bigger in every which way than the outgoing E-Class Coupe means it feels far more spacious. Tall adults won’t enjoy life much in the back, but that’s par for the course with a car like this. Speaking of which, it has split-folding rear seats as standard so it’s actually moderately practical – especially for the golfer or skier types that car companies love to claim drive these sorts of cars. 

The boot space, at 450 litres, is 90 litres less than the saloon’s but that still makes it sizeable – for reference, a Ford Focus has a 316 litre capacity, while like-for-like rival the BMW 6 Series has a 460 litre space. 

You could, feasibly, run an E-Class Coupe as a family car if your children are slightly older and able to get themselves over the front seats – the doors open wide and the seats slide quite far forward for relatively easy access. 

Standard equipment

AMG Line specification includes Garmin Map Pilot navigation system with 8.4-inch display, Parktronic parking sensors with reversing camera and Park Pilot self-parking system; Collision Prevention Assist Plus autonomous emergency braking system, Pre-Safe anticipatory safety system (including Pre-Safe Sound, which helps prevent damage to hearing), 64-colour selectable LED interior lighting, two-zone automatic climate control, three-spoke multifunction steering wheel with dual touchpads, Artico ‘leather’ upholstery with heated front seats, LED headlights and taillights; electrically folding mirrors, 19-inch alloy wheels, AMG styling elements, three-spoke AMG steering wheel, 

Child seats that fit a Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe (2017)

Our unique Car Seat Chooser shows you which child car seats will fit this car and which seat positions that they will fit, so that you don't have to check every car seat manufacturer's website for compatibility.

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What's the Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe (2017) like to drive?

Everything about the E-Class Coupe feels geared towards gentle refinement. It has one of the quietest four-cylinder diesel engines ever made in the E 220 d, and even the six-cylinder petrol version, with 333PS and a 0-62mph time of 5.3 seconds, doesn’t feel especially raucous.

Our only real criticism of the engines on offer concerns the E 300, whose turbocharged four-cylinder petrol engine is quite course. 

Other than that, the Coupe shares the overarching quality of the rest of the E-Class models in being more suited to the motorway than anything else. Expect a sports car here and you’ll be slightly disappointed. That’s not to say the E-Class isn’t fun to drive – it is. It’s a nicely balanced rear-wheel drive coupe, with a sharp turn-in, quick throttle response, natural brake feel and a near-perfect driving position.

Buying a 4Matic four-wheel drive version doesn't change the car's fundemental feel or balance either, but just gives you that bit of extra security. Either way there’s plenty of front-end grip, but the lightness of the steering, the suppleness of the suspension and the general quiet airiness of the cabin combine to make the E-Class Coupe very relaxing – in that sense it’s the classic Mercedes-Benz two-door. 

The high specification means ‘Agility Control’ suspension comes as standard, meaning you can adjust it within various stages of soft (it’s never firm), but you’ll still pay £1500 for air suspension (standard on the E 400). Don’t bother – you don’t need it. 

All this said, the driving experience is still an improvement on the old E-Class Coupe in every way – it manages to be more involving at speed yet more comfortable. The suspension controls the body well, countering roll without being firm, which means the car feels settled on the motorway.

But set the drive select system into sport mode and, with snappier gear changes and more weight to the steering, it’s genuinely enjoyable. 

As you’d expect it’s packed with technology, much of it designed to make the car both safer and more agreeable over long distances – even down to things like ‘Magic Vision Contol’, which is basically windscreen washer jets built into the wiper blades, for exceptional screen clearing powers. 

As usual, however, most of the good stuff is reserved for the options list - there are myriad ways to spend more money tarting up your E-Class with tech. Lane tracking with automatic lane keeping for the motorway is a £600-odd option, while ‘Driving Assistance’ will automatically steer you in lane and keep you a set distance from the car in front using both the accelerator and brakes. That’s £1700. 

Engine MPG 0-62 CO2
AMG E 53 33 mpg 4.4 s 200 g/km
E 220 d Automatic 57–61 mpg 7.4 s 119 g/km
E 220 d Automatic 4Matic 53 mpg 7.6 s 137 g/km
E 300 40 mpg - 160 g/km
E 300 Automatic 36 mpg 6.5 s 160 g/km
E 350 Automatic 41 mpg 5.9 s 158 g/km
E 350 d Automatic 4Matic 43 mpg 6.0 s 174 g/km
E 400 34 mpg - 189 g/km
E 400 Automatic 4Matic 34 mpg 5.3 s 189 g/km
E 400 d 4Matic Automatic 47 mpg 5.1 s 158 g/km
E 450 4Matic Automatic 32 mpg 5.6 s 202 g/km

Real MPG average for a Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe (2017)

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

78%

Real MPG

24–50 mpg

MPGs submitted

17

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

What Cars Are Similar To The Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupe (2017)?

Key attributes of the this model are: Coupe and Compact premium.

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