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Honda CRV - Used Honda CRV considerations - Finn88

I'm looking to buy a used Honda CRV (probably 04-06 reg) for occasional use (less than 7,000 miles a year). It will primarily be used to cope with adverse wet (floods) and winter weather on rural roads, plus motorway journeys every now and then. My search criteria have generated a range of vehicle options spanning Executive (leather trim & bonus gadgetry), SE and Sport models. All fall within the £4,000-£5,500 price bracket; some with automatic transmission, some manual.

Which would you suggest would be the wisest choice in terms of deciding between age of vehicle, mileage (lowest is 49,000 for 54 reg; highest is 100,000 for 06 reg) and even transmission? Should I be looking for something with low mileage to ensure optimum reliability, or opting for a higher mileage vehicle because I know I won't be adding too many extra miles to the total over the next year or two? Also, are there any advantages/disadvantages to automatic transmission if it will be used to drive through water- and snow-covered lanes?

This CRV will essentially be a 'functional workhorse' – but it would be nice for it to be a comfortable and relaxing drive too... Any advice greatly appreciated – thanks in advance.

Honda CRV - Used Honda CRV considerations - Happy Blue!

Hondas are generally reliable. CRVs are perfect for the sort of driving you are considering. The choice of auto and manual is down to you - there will be an economy loss with the auto but over 7,000 miles pa the difference may not bother you and chossing either will give you a wider market to select from.

The question is in essence do you buy newer with high mileage and older with low mileage. That depends. In extremis I would not buy a 100,000 mile car with an 06 reg whereas a nine year old car with 49,000 miles is only 5,700 miles pa is suspect simply due to age.

Generally buy the newest car you can with lowest mileage you can afford, but take care not to buy a car that has driven to the shops and back once a week and then done very little other driving.

Honda CRV - Used Honda CRV considerations - focussed

Bear in mind that if you want it to use in the winter, that the Honda CRV, either the old body shape or for that matter the new shape, is not a true four wheel drive. They are front wheel drive with the rear wheels becoming driven if the fronts slip. If Honda marketed a proper 4WD I would buy one tomorrow, as I need a proper 4WD for where we are and what we do.

Honda CRV - Used Honda CRV considerations - RT

There are crude 4WD systems that simply split the torque front:rear on a fixed ratio - and then there's smart 4wd that get the torque where the grip is, using a variety of techniques, but all infinitely better than crude 4WD except in really slippy conditions where there's virtually no grip.

The CR-V is smart 4wd.

Honda CRV - Used Honda CRV considerations - gordonbennet

I expect the high mileage manuals are Diesels and the autos petrols, no autoDiesel available in the model mentioned.

Buy whichever you want they are all good but make sure its been serviced thoroughly and that servicing is up to date.

Recently changed the front driveshafts on my sons 105k Diesel Exec seemingly they can fail around that mileage, that would have been a £1000 job at the dealer but he bought refurbed and we did the work ourselves for around £250 all in.

For your expected use i would buy as low a mileage well mainrained petrol auto as i could find.

Their car is very sure footed in normal adverse weather and typical English ice and snow, its not a hardcore offroader though so don't expect to be plowing 4ft snowdrifts with the Landcruisers.

Edited by gordonbennet on 25/06/2013 at 22:24

Honda CRV - Used Honda CRV considerations - focussed

Smart as it may be, part time 4WD is no good for dragging a trailer loaded with 2 1/2 tonnes of firewood out of a boggy forest as we sometimes have to, and the CRV doesn't have a low range box either.

Interestingly, I quite often use my L200 in 4WD high on wet roads just to excercise the transmission. This is ordinary mechanical 4WD with no centre diff - works a treat on wet diesel-soaked roundabouts!

Honda CRV - Used Honda CRV considerations - RT

Trailer plus 2.5 tonnes off-road is commercial - why would any other road car be considered?

Smart 4wd suits the needs of the vast majority.

Honda CRV - Used Honda CRV considerations - madf

The vast majority of 4x4s never go near a field and as some have discovered, a 4x4 on ice is as lethal as 2wd.. (A local was killed in a 4x4 skidding on ice and overturning into a stream)

Honda CRV - Used Honda CRV considerations - SteveLee

The vast majority of 4x4s never go near a field and as some have discovered, a 4x4 on ice is as lethal as 2wd.. (A local was killed in a 4x4 skidding on ice and overturning into a stream)

Nothing has traction on ice - the point of going for a "proper" offroader as a winter car is the air intake will (should!) be sensibly mounted as far away as possible from potential floodwater.

Any car will cope with 99% of the UK's winter conditions on appropriate tyres, if you're in an area where flood water is a common problem then that introduces a key requirement for an off-road type car.

Honda CRV - Used Honda CRV considerations - SteveLee

There are crude 4WD systems that simply split the torque front:rear on a fixed ratio - and then there's smart 4wd that get the torque where the grip is, using a variety of techniques, but all infinitely better than crude 4WD except in really slippy conditions where there's virtually no grip.

The CR-V is smart 4wd.

In low traction conditions there's nothing "smart" about only driving the front wheels and then bringing the rears in when the car's already in trouble. Nothing gives you better traction than permanent four wheel drive - no matter how dumb it sounds.

For a low mileage 2nd car with creature comforts I'd get a Mitsubishi Outlander over a CR-V this is a permanent four wheel drive car (as long as you don't accidentally buy a two wheel drive version!) and will be much cheaper to buy than the CR-V. Ditto anything with a Subaru badge on the bonnet will serve you well.

Honda CRV - Used Honda CRV considerations - RT
Mitsubishi Outlander ... this is a permanent four wheel drive car (as long as you don't accidentally buy a two wheel drive version!) .

Outlander

Mitsubishi’s AWC philosophy for the second generation Outlander introduced in 2005 combines an electronically controlled four-wheel drive with an Active Skid and Traction Control (ASTC) system. Mitsubishi used an aluminum roof to lower the center of gravity for better handling response. The Outlander is also available with standard front-wheel drive layout that also included the ASTC system. The previous Outlander employed a 50:50 full-time four-wheel drive system using a viscous coupling center differential. Mitsubishi decided to use the AWC system on the new Outlander that offers three vehicle drive modes and proactively reduces the likelihood of wheel slippage. [20]

The driver can use a drive-mode dial on the center console to select “FWD” for best fuel economy; with “4WD Auto” mode selected, the system uses a rear-mounted electronically controlled transfer clutch to automatically and seamlessly route more power to the rear wheels, depending on driving and road surface conditions. The driver can freely change the drive mode at any time. When “4WD Auto” mode is selected, the Outlander's 4WD system always sends some power to the rear wheels, automatically increasing the amount under full throttle acceleration. The coupling transfers up to forty percent of available torque to the rear wheels under full-throttle acceleration, and this is reduced to twenty five percent over 40 miles per hour. At steady cruising speeds, up to fifteen percent of available torque is sent to the rear wheels. At low speeds through tight corners, coupling torque is reduced, providing a smoother feel through the corner. [20]

For driving in particularly challenging conditions, such as snow, the driver can select “4WD Lock” mode. In Lock mode, the system still apportions front and rear torque automatically, but enables greater power transfer to the rear wheels. In dry conditions, 4WD Lock mode places priority on performance. More torque is directed to the rear wheels than in 4WD Auto mode to provide greater power off the line, better control when accelerating on snowy or loose surfaces, and enhanced stability at high speeds. Rear wheel torque transfer is increased by 50 percent over the amounts in 4WD Auto mode – meaning up to 50 percent of available torque is sent to the rear wheels under full-throttle acceleration on dry pavement. When in 4WD Lock mode, torque at the rear wheels is reduced by a smaller degree through corners than with 4WD Auto mode. [20]

The new Outlander features standard ASTC system on all models, unlike the previous-generation. ASTC helps to prevent side slipping (spin and side drift) as a result of sudden steering wheel operation or on slippery roads. Overall vehicle stability is enhanced in all driving conditions. In front-wheel drive Outlander models – and under all driving modes in four-wheel drive models – ASTC helps keep the vehicle traveling in the driver’s intended direction. The ASTC system takes data input from a number of sensors, including steering angle, individual wheel speed and yaw, as well as from the powertrain electronic control unit (ECU). When it detects side-slipping or wheel spin, ASTC provides integrated control of brakes, engine torque (via the electronic throttle control), transmission and electronically controlled four-wheel drive to improve vehicle stability.

Honda CRV - Used Honda CRV considerations - focussed

In low traction conditions there's nothing "smart" about only driving the front wheels and then bringing the rears in when the car's already in trouble. Nothing gives you better traction than permanent four wheel drive - no matter how dumb it sounds.

Thank you Steve Lee! Engaging straight mechanical 4WD immediately shares the engine power between 4 wheels instead of two, so halves the power each tyre is trying to put to the road.

I've been telling people this for years, but they insist on buying vehicles with over-sophiscated 4WD systems.

And lugging 2 1/2 tons of firewood out of a boggy forest is not a commercial operation, I'ts what some people do over here to stay warm in winter!

 

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