Jaguar XF Sportbrake (2012 - 2015)

5
reviewed by Anonymous on 17 March 2019
4
reviewed by Malcolm Lewis-Jones on 1 December 2018
5
reviewed by Chris Pinkney on 21 June 2018
5

2.2 Diesel Luxury 200PS

reviewed by Brocksdown on 31 July 2014
5
Overall rating
5
How it drives
4
Fuel economy
4
Tax/Insurance/Warranty costs
3
Cost of maintenance and repairs
5
Experience at the dealership
5
How practical it is
5
How you rate the manufacturer
4
Overall reliability

Fast, composed, practical

I am slightly surprised to be writing this review - although my last three cars were Jaguars (after comparison with the best of the competition), a change from a 110-miles-a-day commute to running a leaded glass business and taxi service for two newly-acquired dogs meant a drastic change in priorities. 

My last car was an XF 3.0d saloon, which I liked a lot - but a 3.0d Sportbrake would be hard to justify and I thought  the 2.2d would be just another 4-cyl diesel estate.  I still wanted good residuals, performance and a chassis unruffled by the worst of Britain's roads.  Having previously been impressed with the Skoda Superb, it seemed the obvious choice - until I had a 2.2d Sportbrake as a service loan car.

First impressions were that the engine - although having a rather nasal drone compared to the V6 - is actually very well muted except under hard acceleration.  The 8-speed gearbox works unobtrusively and responds quickly when needed, and overtaking is not really much slower than in the V6.  Fuel consumption driven fairly briskly is in the high 30s for local mixed running and into the 40s for long motorway runs.

The ride - slightly firm at low speed but never harsh - is probably slightly better than my last XF, a combination of the rear air suspension and a "downgrade" to 17in wheels with 55 instead of 45 profile tyres. The factory-fit Pirellis are a lot better than those on my last two Jaguars.  The one thing Jaguars excel at is being able to retain complete composure over difficult road surfaces, and the Sportbrake is no exception - a back-to-back drive left the otherwise excellent Superb feeling totally outclassed.  The Jaguar also had a significant edge in refinement and the Superb's 6-speed DSG gearbox was not as smooth or predictable.  It may seem unfair comparing a Jaguar with a Skoda but when residuals and discounts are considered,  the difference in like-for-like running costs is less than you think.

The Sportbrake's loadspace is rather shallow, but with the seats down and a normal-sized driver you have a flat area of 1.05m x 1.8m with no intruding suspension turrets - it has swallowed everything I have thrown at it so far. The electric tailgate is quick enough not to be annoying.   The rear camera is still a must-have option even though the estate is easier to place.  Also consider the 12x12 way seat option if you want proper lumbar support.  Xenon lights are standard and perfectly adequate.  The standard DAB audio system is very pleasant to listen to my diet of Classic FM - the satnav works well although data entry is even more sluggish than my last XF.

The satnav was also the source of the only warranty issue so far, a defective antenna.  Generally in over 180,000 miles of Jaguar ownership I have found reliability and quality to be better than my previous experience of BMW and VW, and this car seems at least as good as my last three Jaguars. 

So, this one is definitely a "keeper".

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4
reviewed by philxf on 5 June 2014
2
reviewed by DavidW842 on 15 April 2014
5
reviewed by fortygreen on 31 October 2013
4
reviewed by LaurieT on 6 January 2013

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About this car

Price£31,945–£82,525
Road TaxD–M
MPG22.2–57.7 mpg
Real MPG81.3%

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