To signal or not to signal? - Oz
Recently my employer gave 'defensive driving' training to company car drivers - subtle issues like recognising potential hazards, anticipating the unexpected, keeping your distance, positioning for better view of the road on bends, etc. etc. The trainer was an ex police driver instructor.
One issue where I disagreed occurred in a suburban environment where I reached a T-junction, signalling my intention to turn right, knowing full well there was no car following. The conversation went:
"Who were you signalling to? There's no-one behind you."
"Agreed, but there might have been a car in my blind spot, therefore better to signal."
I think we agreed to disagree. What's the current thinking?


To signal or not to signal? - Tom Shaw
If it is clear that there is no one who would benifit from your signal, and that includes pedestrians and vehicles on the major road then a signal is not nescessary. If there are blind areas from which another road user may emerge before you have completed the manouver then you should signal.

Your trainer was trying to encourage you to develop your observational skills rather than just signaling out of habit without properly assessing the risk.

To signal or not to signal? - Doc
Of course, unless you are driving on an airfield with all-round vision, you can never be 100% sure that no one would benefit from a signal.
And what if you reach the junction and then spot someone-you could then be accused of late signalling.
I agree that 'automatic signalling' is wrong, but in most situations on today's busy roads, a signal is required.
To signal or not to signal? - BrianW
I'd go along with Doc, by not signalling you are in effect saying "I am a perfect driver and am 100% sure that there is nobody looking at me who would benefit from my signal".

Poppycock.

If a child cyclist, travelling at perhaps 20 mph or more on the pavement, goes across the side road you are turning into and, seeing you not signalling, assumes that you are going straight on and puts himself under you wheels, who is to blame?

Automatic signalling is not wrong. It merely means that you are giving the maximum amount of information to other road users and pedestrians so that, regardless of whether you have seen them or not, they are fully aware of your intentions.
Brian
Still learning (I hope)
To signal or not to signal? - borasport20
i'm with you and doc on this one brian. we all make decisions on what we can see, but whose to say what you can't see

To signal or not to signal? - SteveH42
Surely it is best to signal regardless? Quite apart from the fact another car might approach, you should consider any pedestrians who are looking for signs as to what you are doing. Much safer to signal (as long as it is done correctly) than to not signal at all and potentially mislead people as to your intentions? The only place where I wouldn't typically signal is where the road has lanes specifically for certain purposes - turning right etc. The fact you are in that lane should tell people what you intend to do.
To signal or not to signal? - borasport20
Tom - am i right in thinking you are a driving instructor ?

If all instructors we to teach the viewpoint of 'risk assesment' then we may have better driving standards/fewer accidents

one of the reasons i stopped going to the IAM was inconsistency, sunday morning observed run, approach a complex junction, check for traffic & pedestrians, see none, then signal - praised one week, critised the next, yet i would say i didn't just approach the junction and signal. I would say that on both occasions i had to stop at lights, that during that time other road users may approach and i can't see in all directions at one, and that given the amount of street furniture at that junction, you would have to wait for quite a while to be sure there were no pedestrians about

There are drivers whose only positive actions at a junction are to steer and signal, but I don't think that to always signal is a bad thing, and if done in addition to all the other checks you should make, it cannot be a bad thing (unless it's ambiguous, 'cos somebody will have an example where it was the wrong thing)


I have to grow old - but I don't have to grow up
To signal or not to signal? - L'escargot
If it is clear that there is no one who would
benifit from your signal, and that includes pedestrians and vehicles on
the major road then a signal is not nescessary. If there
are blind areas from which another road user may emerge before
you have completed the manouver then you should signal.
Your trainer was trying to encourage you to develop your observational
skills rather than just signaling out of habit without properly assessing
the risk.



Couldn't have put it better myself. I'm sure that a lot of drivers signal instinctively rather than on the basis of need, and this can indicate a lack of awareness. I'm also sure that the "I've signalled so I don't need to look" attitude of a lot of drivers is the cause of many accidents. My own approach is to first assess whether a signal will have any value. If it won't, then I don't signal. But I do make every effort to be aware of everything that is going on around me. On dual carriageways I always partly turn around and look behind before changing lanes. I doubt whether driving schools teach that technique.

L'escargot by name, but not by nature.
To signal or not to signal? - smokie
I had similar training about 12 years ago. I learnt some things which have stayed with me ever since. Mostly common sense, probably known by most here but still worth repeating

When joining a motorway on a slip road, don't bother to signal as you intend to merge into the traffic - as there is nowhere else for you to go anyway.

When waiting to turn (right) across traffic, keep your wheels pointing straight ahead so if you happen to be hit from behind you aren't pushed into oncoming traffic, or left back into the flow beside you

When stopping behind a car (e.g. at lights) stop with his rear wheels appearing to rest on your bonnet, this will always give you enough room to go round him if he's stalled ( - which assumes someone in the other lane will let you in!)

And the one which I can't remember properly was...when joining on a downhill ramp, staying in left hand lane (or was it r hand?) of the slip road gives m'way traffic longest view of you...and it was the opposite lane when joining uphill. I think that's the right way round!!

It was a foul day when I did mine, and I was following a coach chucking up loads of spray at about 70mph on the M4 (pre-speed limiters!). I muttered...if you weren't sitting there, I'd step on it and get by - he said Go right ahead, that's the right thing to do. (Not sure a speed camera would see it like that tho)
To signal or not to signal? - Doc
The DSA driving manual says you should signal when joining a motorway......
To signal or not to signal? - Flat in Fifth
I do hope this thread is not going to get as heated as last time we discussed it.

My point, as last time, is that if you go through the thought(1)process of
a) is there anybody there? no
b) could there be somebody there? maybe
c) better signal then

or if the answer to b) is no then you don't signal is the correct way.
What it does is keep you from putting your car in a place where your eyes and brain haven't been first.
Automatic indicating could mean not enough thought applied.

(1) thought = keyword
To signal or not to signal? - Oz
Sorry for duplication - I only recently joined the forum and was unaware of the previous thread.
To signal or not to signal? - Tom Shaw
Quite right about always signalling when joining a motorway, as the indicator helps to alert other drivers to your prescence. On any occasion where there are other vehicles or pedestrians I would indicate, even when in a marked right turn lane. The markings might not have been noticed by everyone and even if they were the signal confirms your intention and avoids doubt about whether you have wandered into the wrong lane and are going to continue straight ahead.

An instance where I would not signal is turning at a junction with no hedgerow and an uninterupted view in every direction showing no one else about. If, however, I was in any doubt at all I would indicate. As stated earlier, the trainer in this case was trying to encourage Oz to read the situation and react to what he saw, rather than signalling parrot fashion regardless of the need.
To signal or not to signal? - Flat in Fifth
Tom, re the right turning lane situation and in a queue at traffic lights say.

At front or back of queue I keep signalling, but when other vehicle(s) behind turn the indicator off until the lights/queue about to change/move when they go back on. On the basis of reducing dazzle at night and mechanical sympathy perhaps.

Is that practice correct or should I just keep flashing?

(Quiet Toad.......Toad!!!)
To signal or not to signal? - Dave_TD
I would say that when stationary in a long queue your signal isn't going to be of any benefit to anybody, so along with the mech sympathy/dazzle reduction idea I would tend to agree no signal. But when the traffic situation around begins to change a signal WILL affect/help the traffic around you, so on it goes! IMO.
To signal or not to signal? - Tom Shaw
I would agree with you on that, FiF.
To signal or not to signal? - Tynesider
Is there any point in signalling when you are in a lane with a dirty great arrow saying which way you must go? Whatever the books say, what is the point of signalling a RIGHT TURN when joining a motorway when you are merging straight on and there is no other possible thing you can do. You can however use your signal to join a motorway to indicate you are barging in regardless of other traffic. Also, why confuse people by signalling 3 side turnings before the one you are going to use as many drivers do due to poor observation?
The point is really as said many times in this thread, only signal if it makes your intentions clear, and there is someone to see the signal.
To signal or not to signal? - Andrew-T
An entertaining mixture of opinions here. As HF asks, what is gained by not indicating, even if one is certain no-one else is looking? (though I don't indicate if there seems to be no observer). Also, I believe indicators are to give warning of one's intentions, not just to advertise one's presence - or put another way, attract others' attention when that may be better directed elsewhere. For that reason there seems no point in indicating when joining a motorway, as intentions are obvious, in fact there is no alternative.
To signal or not to signal? - HF
Andrew-T, sure, agree about the motorway bit - but truly in any other situation I cannot see the point in NOT indicating - it doesn't hurt the driver, and if there's no-one around to witness it - well, it STILL doesn't hurt the driver! I'm sure loads here will disagree with me on this....
HF
To signal or not to signal? - Andrew-T
Another question concerning indications is how one should allow for false ones - either accidental snatches on the stalk, or absent-minded or mechanical failure to cancel. The only 'safe' indication is one you have seen initiated, rather than one which has just appeared from behind some obstacle - and even then they can be wrong.
To signal or not to signal? - BrianW
In order to mimimise the possibility of false indications on the motorbike, which in the past has led to one or two near misses when I have omitted to cancel after a corner as with a full face helmet you have to deliberately look down to see the flashing light, I have had an audible warning fitted.
It has the added advantage that it alerts pedestrians that I am intending turning!

Brian
Still learning (I hope)
To signal or not to signal? - HF
I never pull out in front of someone indicating, for precisely this reason, until it's obvious that they're actually turning.
HF
To signal or not to signal? - FFX-DM
I never pull out in front of someone indicating, for precisely
this reason, until it's obvious that they're actually turning.
HF


That's what I chose to do, although it's amazing how many drivers behind you are willing to 'encourage' you to take the signal at face value and move off.

I would say that automatically indicating, even when there's nobody around to see it, is worse than not indicating at all, which we all see far too much of. If the downside of it becoming an automatic response is that it happens when there's nobody to see it, then I can live with that.

This suddenly makes me think of that 'if a tree falls in the forest when nobody is near, does it make a sound?' thing.
To signal or not to signal? - HF
Agree with you totally, FFX, you're right about the 'encouragement' from other drivers behind you, too, who seem to think you're being hesitant and overcautious.
HF
To signal or not to signal? - Bromptonaut
An entertaining mixture of opinions here. As HF asks, what
is gained by not indicating, even if one is certain no-one
else is looking?


This is the question I come back too. The only purpose in not indicating is to demonstrate your observation skills to your instructor. Would be much better to verbalise that, adding "but i will indicate anyway just in case my observation is NOT perfect".
To signal or not to signal? - Dave_TD
Left lane if joining uphill, right lane if joining downhill.
To signal or not to signal? - borasport20
When joining a motorway on a slip road, don't bother to
signal as you intend to merge into the traffic - as
there is nowhere else for you to go anyway.

It's amazing how inattentive other drivers are (and you are going to be watching them in you mirrors and do an over-ther shoulder look), but given that you've only got a couple of seconds to carry out the maneuvre(?), this is one situation i would say if you are absolutely certain there is no traffic, don't signal, but otherwise signal

When waiting to turn (right) across traffic, keep your wheels pointing
straight ahead so if you happen to be hit from behind
you aren't pushed into oncoming traffic, or left back into the
flow beside you


smokie - i cannot agree more with you on this one - it may be a small risk, but for no gain at all. Even worse is to start to turn right across lane 2 of the opposing carriageway, thus limiting the view of traffic coming towards you
When stopping behind a car (e.g. at lights) stop with his
rear wheels appearing to rest on your bonnet, this will always
give you enough room to go round him if he's stalled
( - which assumes someone in the other lane will let
you in!)
>>

cant agree more (again !) and conversly I get just a bit wound up when the car behind me is so close that I cant see his headlights, even though they are on, and that happens most days of the week !

I have to grow old - but I don't have to grow up
To signal or not to signal? - Oz
Another side issue from the thread author:
The discussion group was asked, what can you conclude when another vehicle flashes you?
The approved answer was: The headlamp bulbs work.
To signal or not to signal? - frostbite
Perhaps I should have started a new thread on this one?

When leaving a roundabout you should ALWAYS indicate left, but when do YOU indicate right?

AFAIK, right-indicating approaching or on a roundabout is not a 'legal' activity or requirement, but most of us do it at some time - and too many leave it going as they leave !

I usually only give rh indication on approaching a TJ roundabout with exits only to left or right.
To signal or not to signal? - Bromptonaut
AFAIK, right-indicating approaching or on a roundabout is not a 'legal'
activity or requirement, but most of us do it at some
time - and too many leave it going as they leave
!
I usually only give rh indication on approaching a TJ roundabout
with exits only to left or right.


What about roundabouts, North Grafton r/b in Milton Keynes is an example, with lanes showing markings for both "leave at this exit" and "carry on to next"?. If you fail to indicate right you may be assumed to be failing to indicate left. Came within microns of Fiat Panda due exactly that just before Xmas.

Simon
Bugbrooke
Northants


To signal or not to signal? - HF
Sorry to do the 'HF' bit on this, but I really can't see any reason not to indicate, at any time. If there's traffic/pedestrians, then great, but if there don't seem to be any, then what benefit do you get by not indicating anyway, just in case?
HF
To signal or not to signal? - BrianW
"When leaving a roundabout you should ALWAYS indicate left, but when do YOU indicate right?"

Hasn't signal etiquette on roundabouts been covered recently?


Brian
Still learning (I hope)
To signal or not to signal? - SteveH42
Very thorny one this, especially considering the appalling roundabout discipline here in Stockport...

Every situation is different, but generally:

2 exits, signal left or right.
3 exits, signal left if going left, no signal until you pass first exit if going straight on, signal if going right.
4 exits, signal as above for exits 1 and 2. No signal but approach in right lane (assuming 2 lanes) for exit 3, signal left after passing exit 2. Signal right for exit 4 until passed exit 3 then signal left.

The timing of the signal change is quite important though to not confuse other drivers. Larger roundabouts tend to have marked lanes so would only signal if going most of the way round.
To signal or not to signal? - Tom Shaw
One point I'd like to make is that I am not saying that signalling on every occasion is wrong. It is not, and I would not dream of instructing a learner driver to assess whether a signal is nescessary or not, because they do not have the experience to always come to the correct decision.

But going back to the original post by Oz, if you have made certain that there are no other road users present then not signalling is not wrong either. Provided you have made sure there is no one there or no where from which somebody may appear a signal would not be of any benifit. Oz's trainer was trying to make him think of his actions at a higher level than he normally does.

Sorry to keep repeating that point, but it is central to the argument in this particular case.
To signal or not to signal? - HF
Hi Tom, I DO understand what you're saying, as a driving instructor - but I still don't see why the 'better safe than sorry' rule can't apply here? I understand why you say that sometimes not signalling is not wrong - but as a general rule wouldn't it be safer for everyone to signal, just in case? (in case they've missed something, in case they have a blind spot, in case a motorcycle has suddenly appeared alongside them in the time that it takes to blink?)

Sorry if I'm missing the point.
HF
To signal or not to signal? - Dwight Van Driver
Fraid this subject if debated in The Bar could lead to a punch up in the Gents as there are as many for as against.

Personally I am with Tom and Fif as I was taught to consider fully the impact of a signal as opposed to the many that are about who automatically and thoughtlessly slap one in.

Would suspect that those with my views have been in the hands of a Plod or IAM Instuctor.

DVD
To signal or not to signal? - terryb
HF
I'm with you on this one. If it does no harm and might do some good then why not do it?

And however well trained, Plod drivers are just as human and as likely to mis-assess a situation as the rest of us as is sometimes tragically proved.

All IMHO of course.

Terry
To signal or not to signal? - RichardW
I think the point about to signal or not is the thought process that comes BEFORE the signal. If you automatically signal you think "I'm going to turn, signal on" (Or in the case of most drivers, "I'm going to turn, slow down, change road position, brake into corner, just as hand passes indicator stalk whilst turning knock signal on") if you consider if a signal is necessary your though process becomes "I'm going to turn, is there anybody who could benfit from a signal, might there be anyone I can't see who would benefit from a signal, make a choice to signal or not" If you are using the latter it alwys brings into focus what is going on around the hazard you are negotiating and helps to focus your observation. If your conclusion at the end of the thought process is "yes, signal required" every time, then by all means signal every time - at least you have considered you actions, and are not just signalling 'because I am turning'.

As to the roundabout, I always make a right signal if going past more than one exit, or where it is not obvious which exit you will take - this allows people to know you are intending passing their exit and they (might) not pull out in front of you!

Richard
To signal or not to signal? - terryb
I think the point about to signal or not is the
thought process that comes BEFORE the signal. If you automatically
signal you think "I'm going to turn, signal on" (Or in
the case of most drivers, "I'm going to turn, slow down,
change road position, brake into corner, just as hand passes indicator
stalk whilst turning knock signal on") if you consider if a
signal is necessary your though process becomes "I'm going to turn,
is there anybody who could benfit from a signal, might there
be anyone I can't see who would benefit from a signal,
make a choice to signal or not"


Meanwhile, you've just mown down a crocodile of primary school kids and wrapped yourself around a tree :o)

Terry
Signals on roundabouts - Tom Shaw
Of all the situations where lack of or misleading signals cause problems, roundabouts are the worst. Many drivers have no understanding of either when a signal is required or omit them all together.

Many years ago the IAM used to advocate that the only signal nescessary on a roundabout was the left indicator when approaching your exit. Therefore, any vehicle not showing a signal was to be assumed to be circumnavigating the roundabout and drivers waiting to enter should hold back until the vehicle had signaled left or had passed.

They gave up on this idea to come into line with the Dept Transport, who advocated a right signal if going past 12 o'clock and then left to leave, left signal on approach if taking the first exit and no approach signal if taking an intermediate exit before 12, then a left to exit.

Mores the pity that that it wasn't the Dept Trans who switched to the IAM system which was much simpler and self explanatory.
Signals on roundabouts - wemyss
I agree with HF on this. As she rightly says it can do no harm and just may save a pedestrian or a cyclist or whatever.
I'm sure we have all experienced the blind spot in our right hand mirror.
Only a few months ago I heard a unusual thumping noise as I was travelling into Derby centre.. Nothing in my mirrors..
As I put my indicator on to turn right onto the ring road because of the noise I turned and looked through all windows.
There was an ancient old single cylinder motor bike alongside of me. He quite rightly gave me an old fashioned look and I tried to signal sorry. But at least the indicator would have given him an early warning if I had began to turn.
And on joining motorways once agan why not use them.
Signals on roundabouts - SteveH42
In some ways, both systems make sense. It is handy to tell people you aren't coming off soon (DoT), but also handy to make people think you are carrying on and not to risk pulling out (IAM)

However, the main problem is that there is no consistency in application. And even more so, there are far too many people who give no signals at all. As a very minimum you should indicate you are going to leave, but do so properly, to let people know they can safely join. The number of times I've had someone appear to be aiming for an exit just to seemingly change their mind and carry on is stupid.

Lane discipline on roundabouts is another area where there is no consistency. I always considered that the right hand lane (out of 2) was the correct lane for exits 3 and 4, but from experience and talking to people I know, it seems a lot of people prefer to use the left lane for exit 3. Even worse are those that use the right lane for exit 2!

Maybe roundabouts should be done away with for the amount of hassle they cause....
Signals on roundabouts - HF
Terry and Alvin - at last I have people agreeing with me on a motoring issue - thank you both!

Just as a quick addition, maybe relevant here or maybe on the 'things that annoy you' thread - the amount of people that just DON'T indicate on mini-roundabouts, causing all kinds of uncertainty and hold-ups for everyone else, is phenomenal!
HF
Signals on roundabouts - daryld
Just look at any insurance accident claim form. This is what my one says:

'..please state...signals....displayed by either party at the time of the accident.'

If in doubt indicate.
Signals on roundabouts - MartinB
It is amazing how polarised peoples views are.

To me it seems obvious that you should ALWAYS indicate, even when you don't think that there is anyone who will see your signal. By the time you have scanned the mirrors, the horizon and all possible hazards you have wasted valuable seconds.

Just DO IT.

I think that it is common sense and courtesy to inform others of your intentions.

However I agree that you should never just ASSUME what another driver is going to do .....



Signals on roundabouts - Dynamic Dave
With regard to indicating when no one is about, who is going to benefit from you doing it if no one is there to see it? It's all down to observation. You've observed no one is about rather than just indicating out of habit.
Look at it another way. - Flat in Fifth
OK one comment then lets take this signalling thing onto a different level.

Number of people have commented as a justification for always signalling "But there might be someone in my blind spot"

This attitude means that you have no idea if anything is there or not and are relying by your signal that whoever will keep out of your way. Totally outrageous frankly and just makes the point about idiots on autopilot even more strongly.

Now two scenarios.

1) Driving along a NSL single carriageway, speed whatever say 60, no entrances, no junctions, no pedestrians, no other vehicles , no walls hedges whatever. Ahead is a 30 limit and you have room to slow down to 30 just by lifting off the throttle and use engine compression.

2) Exactly same piece of road and scenario, except this time there is a vehicle following you about 2 seconds behind.

What signals do you give in scenarios 1 & 2, if any.?

Answers waited with interest.
Look at it another way. - Dynamic Dave
FIF,

It would depend if it were plod behind you or not. If it were, then I would use a combination of engine braking and lightly touching the brakes to indicate "I'm making the effort to reduce my speed to 30mph" officer. If it were Joe Bloggs behind then hopefully he would assume that I'm slowing down by engine breaking alone due to the fact that the gap between us is decreasing.
Look at it another way. - Oz
This attitude means that you have no idea if anything is
there or not and are relying by your signal that whoever
will keep out of your way


Disagree totally.
Let's start a new thread for all those who in their whole driving career have never once been tooted and/or flashed by a car they should have seen but didn't, perhaps which arrived on the scene behind them at mega speed.
Any takers, please start the thread.
Look at it another way. - Flat in Fifth
Stand by my previous comment, looks like a failure to agree registration in the offing.
Look at it another way. - No Do$h
I think we'll have a long wait, Oz.

No Dosh - He who dies with the most toys wins.
Look at it another way. - Oz
I should have added after 'mega speed':
... and/or no lights.
Look at it another way. - FFX-DM
I had an experience this morning on my way to work which sums up many of the pet hates (see other thread) and also such factors as flashing headlights, etc.

On driving through the village I was about to turn L when I saw an oncoming driver waiting and indicating R. I slowed and flashed the lights. She did not respond at all. I flashed again. Nothing. At which point I thought 'oh please yourself' and decided to turn first anyhow. The car behind me was outraged that I had displayed such courtesy and flashed and beeped at me to stop hanging about and then finally, another oncoming car decided to pick that moment to ignore TWO indicating cars and overtake the first oncoming car, causing me to swerve to avoid him as I turned L. Deep joy.
Look at it another way. - frostbite
There are a small minority of drivers who make a point of never responding to 'illegal' signals, such as headlamp flashes.

Problem is, they don't display any flags or signs to help you identify them.
Look at it another way. - HF
Think you're right there, Frostbite.

On the other side of the equation, however, are the drivers that flash at you so you think they're giving way, only to change their minds as you're halfway pulled out, because they've realised that if they do let you in the lights are likely to turn red again for them.
HF
To signal or not to signal? - Martin Devon
Oz when I took both car and bike tests in the seventies my car instructor said if there's nobody there don't signal. I passed both first time. Regards.
To signal or not to signal? - Carole
I was passenger in a car the other day and the driver didn't indicate on turning left. Bloke waiting to come out of junction was (as I would have been) annoyed at no signal - but his annoyance was made clear by the most extreme reaction. Someone who over-reacts so significantly to a lack of indication (even though it IS extremely frustrating) worries me: a potential road-rage candidate?

Also: almost as irritating are those who DO indicate round roundabouts, but don't then change signal to indicate left on leaving it. Makes me think they're not really concentrating on their driving, or possibly just "going throughthe motions" of indicating on entering the roundabout, then - well, just not aware of what they're doing.

Carole
Indicating when nobody about - LHM
What's peoples' opinion on the use of indicators when - you think - that there's no-one around to benefit from it?

I've noticed this when travelling as a passenger, and can't help thinking that automatic signalling can become a substitute for correct observation.

Or is it best to signal, even when we think no-one's about 'just to be sure' - or does that kind of admit we're not doing the observation bit properly in the first place...???
Indicating when nobody about - Dynamic Dave
LHM, previously discussed, so added to original thread to avoid repetition. DD.
Indicating when nobody about - LHM
Thanks, DD - should've done a more thorough search of previous posts.

Sorry about that!
Not Indicating when lots of about - Hairy Hat Man
"....automatic signalling can become a substitute for correct observation."

An exercise in observation which demonstrates this is to not indicate when travelling on a motorway (okay, in reality it has to be relatively 'free flowing'). The theory goes that you should only change lanes when you know that your manoeuvre will not cause any other vehicle to change their course / speed and therefore they do not need an indication of what you are about to do before you do it. Try it... your observation and awareness of how you are interacting with other traffic becomes critical if you want to overtake anything.
Not Indicating when lots of about - Pedant
This topic's been talked to death. No more, please
Not Indicating when lots of about - Hairy Hat Man
Pedant,
If you don'y want to listen or contribute, no-one's forcing you to. Just don't click on the thread - it's not tricky.
Not Indicating when lots of about - Dynamic Dave
This topic's been talked to death. No more, please


So have foglights, but it still gets plenty of airing.
Not Indicating when lots of about - L'escargot
This topic's been talked to death. No more, please


Pedant ~ sounds like you're just being pedantic !!

L'escargot by name, but not by nature.
Not Indicating when lots of about - TrevP
"An exercise in observation which demonstrates this is to not indicate when travelling on a motorway"

Blimey - you'll be asking us next not to brake on motorways!
Not Indicating when lots of about - No Do$h
Blimey - you'll be asking us next not to brake on
motorways!


Far more entertaining to slow on the handbrake and using the gears. That certainly tests the observation of those following you.....

I can't see how signalling in this way can be a bad thing. My thought processes are simply mirror, signal, manouvere in an almost pavlovian manner. If my hand even brushes the indicator stalk, I find myself running through a three-mirror and over shoulder check without even thinking about what has prompted it.

 

Value my car