2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - MrFlower
I would like some advice on the following.
Approximately 18 months ago I bought a second hand Vauxhall Astra. The car was a 2006 model and still had some manufacturers warranty on it.

My car has run well from the day that I got it and I have been very happy with it, I have kept the car maintained to the highest standards although I have not used Vauxhall for any servicing. Last year whilst the car was still under warranty my oil light came on, when I checked the level the oil was fine.

I took my car to Vauxhall who gave the car a clean bill of health.

On Sunday whilst travelling home my oil light came one. I pulled over and checked that my car had sufficient oil, the oil was halfway up the dipstick so I turned the engine on again. The light went out and I continued my journey, about ten minutes later there was a loud bang and my car broke down, I had to be towed from the motorway and then have the car towed from the depot to the nearest Vauxhall dealer. This cost me £150 and £100 respectively.

I was obviously very unhappy that my car had broken down so contacted GM head office who told me that the dealer I had towed it to would investigate it for me, they have came back and said that the issue was due to the car being run with no oil.
They also state that I had to pay for their time investigating the problem.

They then also claimed that the works will cost me apx £4000 as I need a complete new engine. The car is 3 years and 3 months old so according to GM I am out of warranty, the car has only covered about 38,000 miles. Even though I am technically out of warranty I believe a car should last more than 38,000 miles.

I am very disappointed that my car has not lasted as long as I anticipated, when I informed GM of this they claimed that the damage was caused by no oil and that I was negligent.

I know that I have looked after the car and immediately before the incident it had enough oil. I also took the car to Vauxhall with a very similar problem whilst it was under warranty and nothing was done about it (They informed me it was fine!)
Is it worth me pursuing this as it is pretty much their word against mine, I cannot prove that I check the oil before long journeys which they are stating is the car of the damage.

I cannot afford the repair bill or a new car, please help.

Edited by Dynamic Dave on 17/07/2009 at 00:58

Bad situation please help - Number_Cruncher
>>would investigate it for me, they have came back and said that the issue was due to the car being run with no oil.

As you know there was oil in there, this can't be true, and so, they may not have found the root cause.

Has the garage taken the oil pump apart? If not, get them to do this in your presence.

It's not unknown for the external gear on internal / external gear type oil pumps to fail, and jam the pump up. The hexagon drive on the crank nose is fairly weak, and will soon slip.

Was the oil pickup strainer in good condition.?

What position was the oil pressure relief valve found in?, open, or closed?

Bad situation please help - nick
As you haven't used Vauxhall for servicing you may find them lacking in goodwill. Can you prove that the car has been serviced to the maker's specifications using genuine Vauxhall filters etc?
Bad situation please help - injection doc
as Number cruncher has already pointed out these engines are notorious for oil pump failure. It may be worth considering as independant inspector to be there whilst they strip the engine & check both the pump & pressure relief valve for defects. iether the pump ring has fractured or fragment have caused the pressure relief valve to jam open reducing oil pressure & feed.
Bad situation please help - Rattle
Also if you do get know where with GM I am sure you will be able to find a new engine much cheaper else where. Nobody in the right mind would pay £4000 for a new engine surely and VX know that, I think they just try it on.

I think you may also need to be for an indepedant engineers report who may well find somethign to blame a manufacturing defect.

Was their oil in the sump? If so you were not running it without oil something went wrong with oil feed which the others have stated. This entire thing stinks of VX trying it on.

Edited by Rattle on 13/07/2009 at 18:54

Bad situation please help - Number_Cruncher
>>t's not unknown for the external gear on internal / external gear type oil pumps

Re-reading that, I phrased it badly.

Of the two gears, it's the outside, larger diameter, one which fails. As it's teeth are on the inside, it's called an internal gear.

Internal gears are often problematic, because the geometric stress concentration at the root of the teeth also coincides with the thinnest part of the section. For reasons of weight saving and packaging, the outer diameter of such gears is always reduced to the bare minimum which leaves a highly stressed section.

Bad situation please help - Lud
Good stuff NC.

There's a possible middle way between rampant bean-counting and heavyweight over-specifying, isn't there?

If only suits bothered to read the sour expressions on engineers' faces at meetings...
Bad situation please help - Number_Cruncher
It's good engineering to keep the outer gear as thin as you dare - there's the mass of the gear and housing, both increasing with radius squared, the rubbing velocity increasing with radius, and the total amount of machining also going up with radius.

The machining of the casings of these pumps is, in itself, an extremely interesting diversion. Without pedantic detail being considered in the geometry and tolerancing of the sealing surfaces in the crescent section between the gears, the efficiency of these pumps is drastically reduced.

I'm not a huge fan of this type of oil pump, but, it does have the advantage of being able to be driven at crank speed, and hence driven directly off the crank nose.

Bad situation please help - slowdown avenue
did the loud bang come from the oil pump,that would be near your right foot. have you always used the correct oil. where you accelerating when it went bang
Bad situation please help - Dynamic Dave
Last year whilst the car was still under warranty my oil light came on when I checked the level the oil was fine.
On Sunday whilst travelling home my oil light came on. I pulled over and checked
that my car had sufficient oil the oil was halfway up the dipstick


Would this be the oil pressure light you're referring to and not the low oil level light? - which unless it's a quite high spec car won't have a low oil level light.

I've seen reference to this before where some people mistake the light for something that it actually isn't.

If it was the low oil pressure light, then continuing to drive the car has what's caused the damage.
Bad situation please help - Lud
The OP said he took the car to Vauxhall when it was still in warranty after the oil pressure warning light came on briefly, and the firm gave it a 'clean bill of health'.

One would think a main dealer - I suppose that is what it was - might make a proper investigation of the oil pump if that had happened. But it would cost a lot so they probably didn't. It certainly looks from the OP as if 'Vauxhall' is morally liable for this failure and should compensate in full. Cars just out of warranty shouldn't fail catastrophically if properly maintained.

Would it cost so much to have a policy of replacing these weak oil pumps when low pressure is reported?

Edited by Lud on 13/07/2009 at 20:01

Bad situation please help - Armitage Shanks {p}
I wasn't aware of any car that has a oil level low warning light, but I am ready to be updated. My car gives me an oil level display shortly after the ignition is turned on and, once the engine is started, there is an oil pressure low warning light which is a seperate indication. It would be interesting to see the "Clean Bill of Health" that OP got, in writing. It could be very relevant to his present situation.

Edited by Armitage Shanks {p} on 13/07/2009 at 20:01

Bad situation please help - Number_Cruncher
>>I wasn't aware of any car that has a oil level low warning light, but I am ready to be updated.

Depending upon model and/or options chosen, Vauxhalls have been available with check control for over 20 years. The early versions used instrumented dipsticks which you had to disconnect to use.

Bad situation please help - Dynamic Dave
I wasn't aware of any car that has a oil level low warning light but I am ready to be updated.


Several years ago a friends Mk3 Escort 1.6 Ghia had one. From what I recall it only worked on initial key turn and didn't constantly monitor. As NC said, Vauxhall have had the system for several years on their higher spec cars which constantly monitor the level.
Bad situation please help - injection doc
well DD many vehicles have low oil level indicators, some more reliable than others, & some now even have an oil contamination indicator as well plus the normal oil pressure light.
the VX ones years ago were so unreliable that people got used to ignoring them.
My Astra 16v had one fitted in 1989 but was so sensative1/4 ltr of the mark & on would come the light
Bad situation please help - bonzodog
Can't speak as knowledgeably as others here about the specific mechanics involved, but I can speak to a certain extent about the legal liability: Vauxhall Motors are unlikely to have any liability whatsoever.

Under Sale of Goods any liability for defective goods lies with the retailer, not the manufacturer. However if the current fault can be confirmed as being consequential of the fault that the OP reported when it was under warranty he may have a claim under the Vauxhall 3 year waranty; the difficulty is how do you demonstrate it was?
Bad situation please help - perro
>>> the oil was halfway up the dipstick so I turned the engine on again <<<

Do you mean that literally MrFlower, or was it half way between min & max?
Did you actually wipe the dipstick before checking the oil level MrFlower?
Seems strange to me that a Vauxhall main dealer would say the fault was caused by a low oil level - if it wasn't.
Bad situation please help - Number_Cruncher
>>Seems strange to me that a Vauxhall main dealer would say the fault was caused by a low oil level - if it wasn't.

Either the OP or the garage are wrong.

The possibilities I put forward are items which might be missed by the garage (either by ignorance and incompetence, or deliberately) which would explain how an engine with oil in the sump could end up with symptoms of oil starvation.

Another possibility might be that the OP wouldn't be the first to pour some new oil into a siezed engine to cover up an embarassment, hoping to gain some payout under warranty or goodwill.

Bad situation please help - Altea Ego
does the gm system log low oil level or pressure in the engine management memory for later reference?


Bad situation please help - Number_Cruncher
does the gm system log low oil level or pressure in the engine management memory
for later reference?


As far as I know, there's no possibility for this to happen.

Bad situation please help - Rattle
Surely they could easily spot fresh oil though?
Bad situation please help - bathtub tom
What, mixed with old, in the sump?
Bad situation please help - boxsterboy
This sounds just like what happened to my old Hilman Hunter 1725. Oil light came on. Dipstick reading 'full'. Engine seized. The oil pump had failed.
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
As pointed out yes I meant oil pressure light. With regards to the dipstick it was halfway between min and max.

I have not tried to top this car up with oil either as some of you suggested, it went straight from the incident to the Vauxhall garage who told me that it needed 4 litres of oil just to get onto the dipstick therefore I must have run with no oil.

I am interested in the oil pump failure theory, would this mean that the existing oil in my engine burned off somehow?
I don't get where all my oil would have gone?

I have a basic understanding of engines and looked after this car so I know for a fact there was oil in it, is there anywhere that amount of oil could have came out due to oil pump failure?
Bad situation please help - davidh
You did wipe the dipstick and re-dip it, didnt you?
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
Yes I pulled the dipstick out, wiped it put it back, wiped it and double checked. Then as mentioned started the engine and the light went off so I continued, the thing is to stop and check my oil I was in a service station so if it had of needed topping up I would have done it
Bad situation please help - perro
I'm going back a few years now mind, but I had an old Toyota Corona 2000 and it would always show a low oil level on the dipstick, so I purchased a longer dipstick - problem solved!
But seriously - was the car an automatic trans? does it have an oil cooler?
Bad situation please help - Armitage Shanks {p}
The Vauxhall garage put 4 litres of oil into a siezed engine? What would have been the point of that? I think you are being given the run-around!
Bad situation please help - gordonbennet
The Vauxhall garage put 4 litres of oil into a siezed engine? What would have
been the point of that?


Good point there AS, something doesn't sound right.
Bad situation please help - Dynamic Dave
With regards to the dipstick it was halfway between min and max.
the Vauxhall garage who told me that it needed 4 litres of oil just to get onto the dipstick


Somethings isn't right there. If it was halfway between min & max then it should have only needed ½ litre of oil to bring it back up to the max (1 litre measurement between the min & max level) unless of course it dumped a load of oil somewhere when it seized?
Bad situation please help - perro
>>> unless of course it dumped a load of oil somewhere when it seized? <<<

No mention of it seizing up DD.
Bad situation please help - Dynamic Dave
No mention of it seizing up DD.


Oops! I think that was actually mentioned by someone else.
Bad situation please help - L'escargot
I pulled over and checked
that my car had sufficient oil the oil was halfway up the dipstick .............


The only way to get an accurate and consistent reading of the oil level is to check it after the engine has been stationary for some length of time. The length of time needed is somewhat a matter of individual opinion, but I personally err on the side of caution and check mine after it has stood overnight. Some people would say that allowing the oil to cool is the wrong thing to do. What does your car's Owners Guide say? If you check it immediately after the engine is switched off the oil won't have had time to settle down to give a valid reading. Moreover, if your technique is to withdraw the dipstick, wipe it, reinsert it and then withdraw it a second time the reading may well be invalid because of the oil drawn up the dipstick tube on the first withdrawal. I personally prefer to pull the dipstick out once and take the reading straight away.

Are you absolutely sure that you got a valid reading?
Bad situation please help - ifithelps
There is a sufficient margin for error to make talk of the OP's dipstick technique irrelevant.

Hot or cold, if the oil's somewhere between the two marks, then you have enough, but not too much.

He says light came on, he stopped, dipped it, it was fine, he carried on and the engine blew up.

Lack of oil cannot have caused that failure.

Lack of oil in the right places probably did.
Bad situation please help - mike hannon
Has the OP actually seen the engine since the incident? Was it intact?
After a 'loud bang' - which might have been a conrod making a break for freedom - i wouldn't have been surprised to see the contents of the sump all over the ground and back the road.
It wouldn't be a huge surprise to find no oil in the engine after that.
Bad situation please help - perro
>>> The only way to get an accurate and consistent reading of the oil level is to check it after the engine has been stationary for some length of time. The length of time needed is somewhat a matter of individual opinion <<<

Depends on the car comrade - a few mins is usually enough time with modern oils IMO.
Although I have experienced dipstiks where it was a tad difficult to get a true oil level reading after the engine was recently running.
Can't think of the make/model at the mo (had so many!)
On some cars (as you say L'es) it is indeed more accurate to check em from cold.
Bad situation please help - Dynamic Dave
>>> Depends on the car comrade - a few mins is usually enough time with modern
oils IMO.


Correct procedure according to the Astra-H handbook is:

"The oil level must be checked with the vehicle on a level surface and with the engine (which must be at operating temperature) switched off. Wait at least 5 minutes before checking the level to allow the normal engine oil accumulation in the engine to drain into the oil pan."

Edited by Dynamic Dave on 14/07/2009 at 11:27

Bad situation please help - Farmer Boy
There must be lots of good astra engines being binned under the scrappage scheme and with labourcharge a swap would be much less than 4k

I recall a Vx agent trying it on with a diesel astra running unevenly. to cut a long story short I think their parents marriage was invalid! The've now gone out of business HA HA .
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
What should I do?
Get the AA to go to the garage and give an independent assessment?
Bad situation please help - perro
>>>What should I do? <<<

Difficult one MrFlower ... The car was out of warrantee, but only just - it wasn't serviced by a Vauxhall pain dealer so that's 3 Hail Mary's & 4 Our Fathers!
I take it you've got proof in writing Re: the dealer previously checking out why the oil light came on last year?
Read, and re-read all these posts, there is some good advice here.
If you're in the AA or RAC, have a word with them.
An independent engineers report would be a good idea & to check that pump.
I doubt if it would need a complete new engine IMO typical pain dealer speak.
You could try to drag it through the legal system, but that's more ££££££ and there's no guarantee you'd win anyway.
Sorry to be so non-committal comrade, but as I said - its a difficult one!
Best of luck & let us know the result.
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
Thanks perro!

I phoned the AA and RAC and neither will no an in depth report . . they only do visual checks??

Getting someone to actually take the engine apart and examine the oil pump is a bit of a tough one.
I'm going to write to Westons who I originally purchased the car from and see how they want to deal with it . . i'm sure it's worth their while to make me go away
Bad situation please help - Number_Cruncher
>>Getting someone to actually take the engine apart and examine the oil pump is a bit of a tough one.

If the garage have investigated enough to say that the cause is oil starvation, then, they'll be almost in a position to remove the oil pump without any further work.

What exactly has been done to this engine to investigate the fault?
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
I really do not know exactly what the garage has checked, they have run a compression test I think thats about it.
I don't even know how you would do that
Bad situation please help - Armitage Shanks {p}
Not easy to do a compression check on a siezed engine I would have thought? I still think you are being messed about.

Edited by Armitage Shanks {p} on 14/07/2009 at 15:50

Bad situation please help - Focus {P}
I phoned the AA and RAC and neither will no an in depth report .


AA Comprehensive inspection?
www.aacheck.com/viproducts.asp?persist

We had one of these done on a car we purchased from a garage and it proved useful; garage ended up paying for it.

EDIT: sorry on second reading it's still not really what you want I guess

Edited by Focus {P} on 14/07/2009 at 15:25

Bad situation please help - Armitage Shanks {p}
A Vauxhall "Pain" dealer! There's an intersting typo!
Bad situation please help - perro
>>> Not easy to do a compression check on a siezed engine I would have thought? I still think you are being messed about. <<<

Yes, the compression test bit did it for me as well - very, very suspicious!
Think about this one ... if you had a car that had been maintained by a trusted garage,
where would you take that car if it broke down?
Bad situation please help - the swiss tony
>>> Not easy to do a compression check on a siezed engine I would have
thought? I still think you are being messed about. <<<


I may have missed it, but has the OP confirmed the engine DID sieze?
in the 1st posting he said this;

'On Sunday whilst travelling home my oil light came one. I pulled over and checked that my car had sufficient oil, the oil was halfway up the dipstick so I turned the engine on again. The light went out and I continued my journey, about ten minutes later there was a loud bang and my car broke down'

rather than a seized engine i would be looking for AWOL pistons!
Bad situation please help - Armitage Shanks {p}
You are correct TST! OP has not mentioned the Seized word! It would still be difficult to do a compression check with AWOL pistons }l:)
Bad situation please help - the swiss tony
It would still be difficult to do a compression check with AWOL pistons }l:)

Very much so!
Ive had an Vx engine seize (oil pump failure) that went quietly, where as a 'loud bang' normally shows signs of internal/external damage, plus LOTS of oil everywhere...
someone is pulling someone else's chain I feel.....
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
You lot are really helpful!

I had a call from Vauxhall today to let me know they have received my letter and owing to the fact that the car is out of warranty are not prepared to do anything.

I am going to take it up with the garage I bought the car from, if I ask for a refund i'm sure they will help fight my corner with Vauxhall.

I tried local garages to do an inspection for me, they all say that they would prefer not to get involved. If they remove my oil pump how can they proove they did not damage it removing it.

I obviously want to take this as far as I can

Edited by MrFlower on 16/07/2009 at 14:09

Bad situation please help - davidh
Ultimately, if you dont get any joy from the warranty, I think you have two options.

1) Source a secondhand engine from a repuatble source. I reckon a low mileage 1.6 / 1.4 engine would be maybe £500 plus fitting.

2) Speak with an engine reconditioners and see if they will put a new oil pump in it and new crackshaft bearing - that might be all that it actually need. Near where I live there are several small engineering shops/re-conditioners who might be able to help.

On some cars you can even change bearings whilst the engine is in the car. That might save you a few bob.
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
Ok just had a fax, the engineers report is as follows (sp as original):

INVEST:
Investigate & report drier acclerating on motorway loud noise from the engine bay area and smoke comi from the engine.
Customer has been advised that initial 1.0hrs investiga and that will be paid by debit card.

MEC:

VEHICLE TO WORKSHOP CHECKED OIL LEVEL NO OIL IN VEHICLE TOOK 4 LITRES TO GET TO MAX MARK CARRIED OUT COMPRESSION TEST NO 1 CYL 0 NO CYL 50 NO 3 CYL 150 NO 4 CYL 125 LOUD METALIC NOISE COMING FROM BOTTOM END OF ENGINE SUSPECT ENGINE U/S POSSIBLE TURBO DAMAGE DUE TO NO OIL.
FSOIL - Fully Synthetic Engine Oil

So I have been charged £95 for the compression test and £52 for 4 litres of fully synthetic oil . . .apparently.

Hopefully the above will make more sense to some people.

On the phone they stated that it needed 4 litres just to get on the stick, the report says to the top, they also state I was accellerating (I probably was) but never said this.

I assume that from the info about the pistons and the bottom end being noisy that it's still not great news?
Bad situation please help - perro
So ... its a turbo diesel then.
A compression test is not a proper investigation, especially of the bottom half.
Has the cambelt been checked I wonder?
Clearly, the dealer doesn't want to know - you didn't buy it from them, you didn't have it serviced by them, I'd pull it out and see if your servicing garage will take the job on.
Bad situation please help - SteVee
First time I've seen mention of a turbo - I'd guess the same as perro.
Those compression readings are all very low for a diesel.

The engines obviously turning over - but what's been happening inside during these tests ?
Definitely pull it out and get it trailered somewhere else.

A s/h engine may well be the best option.

good luck
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
It's a petrol turbo, it is getting towed to my house tomorrow to sit on my driveway :(

Is it good news that it still turns over then?

As mentioned the garage couldn't really give a stuff, if it still turns over is a rebuild on the cards instead of a new engine?
Bad situation please help - bell boy
its flubbered
have you considered a new greenhouse as a use for it?
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
Would love to see number crunchers view on my engineers report . . .they seemed to know quite a bit about the Vx engine (Oil pump failure etc)

Bad situation please help - jbif
MrFlower - can you give full details of your car model please?

Also, try asking at
www.vauxhallownersnetwork.co.uk/
www.astraownersclub.com/vb/

Bad situation please help - Graham567
Try this website for a replacement engine.

www.247spares.co.uk/
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
MrFlower - can you give full details of your car model please?


2006 Vauxhall Astra Sri, 2.0 Turbo 200ps, Engine type Z20LEH, 5 Door
Thats about all I know {Added to header - DD}

I posted on the astra owners network and had a couple of replies but nothing as in depth as on here!

Edited by Dynamic Dave on 17/07/2009 at 00:59

Bad situation please help - Number_Cruncher
If what you said about checking the oil level AND what the garage said about finding no oil in the engine are both true, then, you need to find where the oil has gone. If there are no big end shaped holes in the side of the block, then, the most likely source of such a rapid leak must be the turbo.

Having said that, I would be a bit surprised if the oil loss led immediately to lost comressions without other damage - I would expect the big end bearings to be damaged and knocking, and probably the cam might seize up.

The garage seems to have checked the oil level and the compressions - enough to tell you that there's serious trouble under the bonnet, but, not enough to really enable you to choose what to do.



Bad situation please help - L'escargot
...... the garage said about
finding no oil in the engine ..........


Is it possible for there to have been no oil in the engine, or was that just another vague statement by the examining engineer, similar to him saying that the engine was "u/s"?

In a situation like this I would expect statements to be factual and accurate.
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
Well on the phone they told me it needed 4litres to just get minimum on the stick, then the report claims that it needed 4litres to max . . . there's a difference there.

And as mentioned to claim that it's just U/S, no details of the turbo condition, no details of the oil pump condition, no details of the rocker cover gasket, no details of the turbo oil seals . . .something isn't right with their diagnosis unfortunately I'm no expert and as mentioned above I'm finding it hard to get a second opinion anywhere!

Today I shall write to the garage I bought it from for their opinion as I will be trying to get a full refund from them . . . I don't even want the thing now

Bad situation please help - MVP
When the OP pulled over and checked the oil, I wonder if it was a "real" level on the dipstick, or was what little oil there was in the engine just draining back and smeared the dipstick? The engine should have been left for a couple of minutes to get a sensible reading.

So, could the turbo oil seals have gone a while ago, the oil burning itself through the back, until there was insufficient oil left in the engine, and hence the seizure?

When was the oil last properly checked before the day in question?

MVP

Bad situation please help - nick
If the turbo seals had gone, surely you'd notice the smoke from the exhaust?

Edited by nick on 17/07/2009 at 10:10

Bad situation please help - perro
>>> surely you'd notice the smoke from the exhaust <<<

Smoke does get a mench - see post Thu 16 Jul 09 13:24
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
I check my oil on a regular basis, just before long journeys (Which this was hence the massive tow bill) and probably about once a week.
Oil and filter service was carried out by Kwik Fit on 30th March with the odometer reading 33719.
The odometer reading on the engineers report at time of failure is 36991

Could my car really have burnt 4 litres of oil over 3200 miles or 3 months? Even with me keeping an eye on it?
I highly doubt that, I am 100% sure that this failure was caused by something failing which caused there to be a lack of oil in the engine, I checked the oil shortly before the incident and there was oil in there, the fact that the garage have not checked some fundamental things infuriates me further.
Bad situation please help - Altea Ego
It is perfectly possible to burn 1 litre per 1000 miles, and some vauxhall engines have been known to do it, so its feasible to have burned 3.5 litres of oil in the time since the fill.

If you "suddenly" loose 4 litres of oil, you see it somewhere. If it had suddenly escaped while driving it would be smeared everywhere


( I have seen a 306 throw a rod on the A1M, the whole car was a black mess)
Bad situation please help - Altea Ego
"And as mentioned to claim that it's just U/S, no details of the turbo condition, no details of the oil pump condition, no details of the rocker cover gasket, no details of the turbo oil seals . . .something isn't right with their diagnosis unfortunately I'm no expert and as mentioned above I'm finding it hard to get a second opinion anywhere!"

you wont get any of that information by paying for just one hours mechanics time.

Bad situation please help - RichardW
Disappointed NC...you didn't rise to the 'Engineer's Report' comment :-))

Wonder if the TECH failed to notice the 4 litres of oil running out on the floor as he filled it....???

If the OP is getting the car back to his house, then I would tempted to get a mobile mech round to look at it, whilst the OP looks on to see what is happening, and the mech explains properly what he finds (other than a knackered engine!).
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
As mentioned problem with mobile mechanics is not too many want to get involved as they don't want it to be claimed that they have damaged the part.
Do any of you know of anyone who inspects and disassembles engines in the essex/hertfordshire area?
Bad situation please help - Number_Cruncher
>>Disappointed NC...you didn't rise to the 'Engineer's Report' comment :-))

Thanks for picking up on that! I must have been rather jaded after my flight to LA to have missed it - as you know, it's normally red rag to a bull!

Bad situation please help - L'escargot
Disappointed NC...you didn't rise to the 'Engineer's Report' comment :-))


"engineers report" not "Engineer's Report". The OP made no reference to rank or qualifications.
Bad situation please help - MrFlower
Regardless of if it is an engineers report or Engineer's Report I know have the car back on my driveway :)

Small victories and all of that, I have also contacted the garage I got the car from asking for their assistance, I'm sure when I start asking for a refund they'll happily find someone to inspect it for me
Bad situation please help - pmh3
>>when I start asking for a refund they'll happily find someone to inspect it for me<<

Surely that is the last thing that you need. You need an independent professional report.

Bad situation please help - MrFlower
How hard can it be :(

I would have thought the AA did it, is there a recognised company that does do it?
Bad situation please help - pmh3
30s on Google......

www.iaea-online.org/searchnearest.asp?Flash=YF

Bad situation please help - MrFlower
30s on Google......
www.iaea-online.org/searchnearest.asp?Flash=YF


Helpful . . . . is there one in my area who will take the engine apart, no they just investigate
2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - OldSock
Nice of them to put that lovely fully synthetic oil into an engine reported to have expired with a loud bang :-(

I'd have thought that any half-decent oill would suffice for 'daignostics'.

It would seem that you're being 'strung along' somewhat, and I'm sadly appalled by the standard of the so-called 'Engineers' handling your case.
2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - bazza
This is a very unfortunate tale and one of my dread scenarios. To be honest, I think you're only going to end up spending even more money if you hire specialists to analyse the failure and then you could then be into a long drawn out battle ending up in court - and even then it's not definite you're going to win. The basic facts seem to be engine failure out of warranty. I think you must bite the bullet and take it from there. If it were me I would park car on drive and buy a banger, anything for a few hundred quid to get you mobile. An Almera or Micra or anything wih long MOT and running. Then I would put all my effort into finding a replacement engine or a rebuilder who can help. Some good ones listed here under "Useful websites" eg IvorSearle looks promising. Put a lot of effort into this. I suspect you may just need a short engine but i really don't know. But I think you can that 4K bill down a large amount. A few years ago I wrecked a ZX diesel engine, completely ( head, piston, con-rod). I only had the block which was scored but useable. A local workshop did it for 900 quid using second-hand bits.
Best of luck and let us know how you get on.
2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - injection doc
May be worth contacting your insurance company to see if they will cover it under accidental cover! they won't cover in full but I have done several engine rebuild covered under accidental damage although normally due to water ingress.
2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - MrFlower
May be worth contacting your insurance company to see if they will cover it under
accidental cover! they won't cover in full but I have done several engine rebuild covered
under accidental damage although normally due to water ingress.


Esure claim mechanial damage is not covered, nice and ethical. They'd prefer I actually crashed.


To add insult to injury just been outside and all four of my alloys are damaged .. . which they werent before.

Thanks Vauxhall

Edited by MrFlower on 19/07/2009 at 16:27

2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - gordonbennet
To add insult to injury just been outside and all four of my alloys are
damaged .. . which they werent before.


Check behind the wheel face to see if the recovery driver's have secured the vehicle by just using a steel hook in the alloy wheel itself....i've seen this hundreds of times and it annoys the hell out of me.
2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - MrFlower
Check behind the wheel face to see if the recovery driver's have secured the vehicle
by just using a steel hook in the alloy wheel itself....i've seen this hundreds of
times and it annoys the hell out of me.


I should think thats what it is, same mark, same size, same place on all 4 :(
2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - Victorbox
>> May be worth contacting your insurance company to see if they will cover it
>> Esure claim mechanial damage is not covered nice and ethical. They'd prefer I actually crashed.


You are buying accidental damage, theft, malicious damage and TP liability cover - do you want us all to be footing the bill for your mechanical breakdown cover with higher premiums?
2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - MrFlower
You are buying accidental damage theft malicious damage and TP liability cover - do you
want us all to be footing the bill for your mechanical breakdown cover with higher
premiums?


The amount I pay being 26 and having a 2.0T I should think I'm entitled to something back, for the past nine years I have paid a thousand pound a year at least for car insurance, how can you be footing the bill when the insurance companies have had such an amount off me with no claim??

Surely I am the one footing the bill, and if they paid 4k out to me they'd still have made a 5k profit . . .plus what they will in the future off me?

Plus they could offer mechanical as an option so people like you don't have to take it
2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - Armitage Shanks {p}
I can see that you are upset about the state of your car and the financial mess that you have been landed in. However, you don't seem to undertstand what your insurance covers you for. You say that they could offer mechanical insurance as an option, but presumably they don't and that is why you haven't got any. I insure my household contents against theft and accidental damage, ie I drop my tv it is covered. If it goes Pop and doesn't work I am not covered. That is the limitation of the cover I bought and, I am sory to say, it appears to be a limitation of the cover you bought. I add that I think your garage are totally useless in every respect but I don't have any ideas on what you can do about that.

Edited by Armitage Shanks {p} on 21/07/2009 at 12:48

2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - MrFlower
I can see that you are upset about the state of your car and the
financial mess that you have been landed in.


SQ

I completely agree with your post, I am not upset about my insurance, just the comments that made it seem like others would have to pay extra if I had extra features.
I am as you say frustrated with the garage and vauxhall, although whilst browsing the net today I did find an engine and turbo on ebay . . that's my worst case scenario sorted as i'll just drop it in myself

Edited by Dynamic Dave on 21/07/2009 at 22:11

2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - Captain Zetec

As far as I'm aware, the VX 2.0 Turbo engine is a SAAB unit. The SAAB 95 is notorious for "the big blow up" generally caused by oil starvation.

What seems to happen is that sludge builds up in the sump, and in particular around the oil strainer. When the strainer gets blocked up, oil pressure is lost and "bang!". Unfortunately the damage is not usually repairable, and I imagine you'll need a new short engine at least.

The bad news is that because the "SAAB blow up" is so common, good second hand 2.0 turbo engines aren't exactly "ten-a-penny".

From the compression test I'd say that something has gone badly astray on No 1 cylinder.

The consensus with SAAB engines appears to be that oil should be changed AND FLUSHED at 5000 mile intervals, using only good quality fully synthetic. The oil should also be drained from the sump plug, not sucked out through the dip stick (which seems to be all the rage at main dealers these days). I imagine the same would apply to VX using this engine. Too late now I know, but might stop it blowing up again once you get it fixed.

Have a look at the SAAB 95 "car-by-car".

Sorry to hear of your predicament...
2006 2.0 turbo petrol - Bad situation please help - MrFlower
Thanks captain zetec, anywhere that I can find this information out . . i.e how can I know it is a saab engine?
 

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