RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - greenhey
Sorry, but at least it helps me ...
Shorter daylight times ahead, is there any chance we might get some help with proper lighting on vehicles this winter ?
As a prelude , in a 30 minute off-peak drive between Aylesbury and Luton last week I counted 25 oncoming vehicles breaking the lighting regs ..... a mixture of running on parking lights (useless, and against the law for over 20 years .. faulty lights..no lights ... and of course boneheads with fogs on)
Rant number 2- for at least 5 years the government tried by persuasion to stop the use of hand-held phones on the move ;eventually as people were too proud/thick to stop, legislation was necessary . By now, people should have got it .Yet three times in the last week I have faced oncominh vehicles, on country roads, wandering across the middle becasue the driver was busy on the phone ..in one case a Merc worth over £30k but apparently it's too much to spend £9.99 on a hands-free kit.
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - Aprilia
Agree with the above. On a roundabout yesterday evening a young girl in a small Pug pulled out on me - clearly seen holding a cellphone in her right hand and chatting away. Can't imagine how she was managing to drive the car.
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - edisdead {P}
re:pt1, i've no qualms about giving poorly illuminated cars a sharp balst of main beam. usually works, apart from the foglighters who remain oblivious.

re:pt2, on encountering these morons on my motorway commute in seemingly increasing numbers I've recently experienced an overwhelming desire to give a long hard blast of horn in protest, however i've managed to resist the urge so far. Anyone else feel the same?

Ed.
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - AngryJonny
I get irritated by excessively bright lights. Whether it's those super-bright lasers that modern cars seem to come equipped with or someone who's had a shunt that's knocked one of their lights out of line.

As for the phone thing, I've recently taken to shouting "get off the ****** phone" to anyone I see on the phone while driving, whether I'm in the car or on foot. Of course they're too engrossed in their conversation to notice.
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - Vin {P}
\"I\'ve recently experienced an overwhelming desire to give a long hard blast of horn in protest, however i\'ve managed to resist the urge so far. Anyone else feel the same?\"

Ohh, yes. Then I realise that they would then have the problem of working out why I was blowing my horn which would leave them doubly distracted.

I once, on a motorbike, stopped at the lights alongside someone who had been weaving all over the road in his merc while trying to use his phone. I suggested he might be better served not to use the phone. His response, \"What the pink flufy dice has it got to do with you?\". Fair point?

V
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - X5
<<<< >>>>

Not a fair point at all, if this bozo's going to take out you, me, himself, my kids stood in the bus queue nearby, and my old mum crossing the road. Surely this is why we have a Highway Code, and get nobbled by plod for breaking the regs even if we've not actually done anyone any harm (yet).
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - edisdead {P}
...I guess the "fair point" is what stops me blasting my horn. However riled i am by dangerous drivers with phones glued to their heads, I am not an agent of law enforcement or a vigilante road safety patrol superhero type person.
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - volvoman
Got to agree with X5 - if everyone had the guts to challenge this sort of thing maybe there'd be less of it. Drinking/ driving was once considered an OK thing to do by most. Not any more thankfully. Driving will be a lot safer and more enjoyable when this sort of thing is considered equally unacceptable.
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - GJD
Got to agree with X5 - if everyone had the guts
to challenge this sort of thing maybe there'd be less of
it. Drinking/ driving was once considered an OK thing to
do by most. Not any more thankfully. Driving will
be a lot safer and more enjoyable when this sort of
thing is considered equally unacceptable.


Since everyone would have their own idea of where the line between and act of citizenship (for want of a better word) and an act of road rage is drawn, you'd get a lot more fighting in the street but that would be about it.

I would not accept unsolicited comment on my driving (or on anything else) from anyone who I did not know to be more highly trained and experienced than me.
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - X5
We're probably all in agreement here, and we're all right as well. British society these days is predominantly selfish, and you challenge anyone's "right" to do what exactly what they want at your peril. And as the car is really an extension of the home and the self, it becomes very personal indeed. As volvoman says, it will take a long-term culture change in society to rid us of this unpleasant "beggar my neighbour" attitude. To subvert someone's tagline, I often feel like a "stranger in my own land" these days; I don't like Blair's Britain at all. But that's nothing to do with motoring is it? (sorry mods).
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - Obsolete
I can but agree. Sigh.
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - Vin {P}
"Drinking/ driving was once considered an OK thing to do by most. Not any more thankfully."

I agree. However, this change was effected by the Police, not by members of the public stopping cars and telling people they were drunk.

A better solution to the mobile phone menace? Possibly use the fact that phone companies can locate a phone to within 100 yards. If the phone is travelling at more than walking pace, no calls except emergency (possibly allow incoming calls up to, say, a minute for emergency incoming calls). As 90% of cars journeys are driver only, probably more than 90% of the calls prevented would be being made by the driver. A better view would be that all drivers would be prevented from making calls. It would also stop calls by passegners on buses and trains and make life much more enjoyable for people who can bear to wait a few minutes to talk to someone.

The problem with all this, of course, is that it would be yet more nanny stateism. Ah, me.

V

PS. When there's an offence of using a mobile, wouldn't a mobile phone company be aiding and abetting if could be proven that they knew a call had lasted over, say 30 miles in 30 minutes?
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - Vin {P}
PS. When there's an offence of using a mobile, wouldn't
a mobile phone company be aiding and abetting if could be
proven that they knew a call had lasted over, say 30
miles in 30 minutes?



Vin, you idiot, it might be a passenger on the phone. Get a grip.
RANT pt 1 and pt 2 - frostbite
I always carry my mobile for my own benefit when driving. It is never switched on.

Then again, I am odd.

 

Value my car