Driving test rules? - P3t3r

Fortunately, I've passed my driving and riding tests. I'm not aware of any books that list the rules and what is expected in the tests. Why does the DSA not publish a set of rules so that people know how to drive during the test?

When I did my riding test I had to do a whole day of tuition to find out what I didn't know. This was expensive, time consuming and the tutors were awful. It turned out that there were only a few minor things that I didn't know and it was a waste of time and money. There was at least one qusetion I asked where the instructor couldn't even give me a straight answer, he gave me an answer that sounded like it came from a book and didn't really answer the question.

Does anybody know whether the rules are published anywhere, and if not, then why not? Is there a rule book that driving instructors can read? Or are the rules a secret so that people don't appeal against test results? btw, appealing against results is a waste of time because the result stays the same even if you win an appeal.

I know module 1 (off road) of the motorcycles test is well documented online, but I don't believe there is anything about the on-road tests.

My motorcycle instructors seemed to shout about weird and insignificant things, but then didn't care about things like stopping in box junctions. The rules made very little sense to me, but maybe they weren't always right?

Driving test rules? - RT

Click through each of the sections here www.gov.uk/practical-driving-test-for-cars/overview That's probably not as detailed as you're asking for though

Driving test rules? - Doc
Using a hire car

Hire cars can only be used in tests if they’re fitted with dual controls and meet all the other driving test vehicle rules.

Does this mean that all cars used on a test must be dual-controlled?

The site seems to say that this only applies to hire cars.

Edited by Doc on 03/01/2015 at 15:02

Driving test rules? - Manatee

Interesting question, P3t3r.

It's a few years since my son passed his test, but the first time I took him out after he had had some lessons he frightened me half to death by doing 60 on the fairly narrow roads around here where very few will touch that speed. There are poorly defined edges, an uneven surface, odd cambers, bends - a typical country road in fact.

Apparently he had been told to drive at the speed limit unless there was a good reason not to. I told him that there was a good reason, but I didn't think it the speed limit was in any way a target for anybody who wished to drive at a lower speed.

I have never been able to find a "source" to confirm this one way or the other.

Driving test rules? - veryoldbear

It's called "making progress" and I believe it has it's origins in Plodspeak.

Driving test rules? - galileo

It's called "making progress" and I believe it has it's origins in Plodspeak.

Exactly. Recommended if taking the IAM advanced test, but I wouldn't think it advisable for a new/inexperienced driver.

Driving test rules? - Manatee

I am familiar with the concept of making progress but I didn't think it was obligatory - do you know different?

Driving test rules? - focussed

The days of dawdling around a test route at 30 mph and doing a couple of manoevres and an energency stop are long gone.

If there is an opportunity to make safe progress on a driving test with due regard to traffic, road and weather conditions the candidate is expected to do so, including overtaking if there is a suitable safe opportunity.

If the driving test route includes a dual carriageway the candidate will be expected to drive to the speed limit on that road which could be 70 mph. In that case an examiner will expect to see 65 + if safe to do that speed-it's all about showing judgement.

Have a look at the DL25 -the driving test report sheet.

www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attac...f

And the standard operating procedure for examiners.

www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attac...f

Driving test rules? - P3t3r

Those are good documents but still don't tell me what I wanted to know. For example:

"Observations: Not taking effective observation before emerging"

This doesn't say what effective observations are. Is it mirror checks, should checks or both?

"Normal driving: Incorrect positioning during normal driving"

This doesn't say what the correct position is. I believe it is in the centre of the lane, but it doesn't state this. What frustrates me is that sitting in the centre of the lane is often not the best or safest position but they don't allow for that.

Driving test rules? - Auristocrat

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency do publications on the theory test for both learners and instructors, and a DVD on preparing for the practical test. All available from retailers like Amazon.

Driving test rules? - P3t3r

I think this is what I was looking for actually. I have one of these books, so I just had a look through it. It seems like some of what my instructors had been saying was not correct. For example, I was always forced to ride in the centre of my lane, but DSA book is more wordy and it sounds like they are actually more flexible depending on the conditions.

Driving test rules? - Chris M

When I taught both my sons to drive a couple of years ago, I read the usual books that they were expected to read, but also this one which I borrowed from the library:

www.amazon.co.uk/Driving-Instructors-Handbook-John...k

Driving test rules? - alastairq

It always amazes me how many people who 'drive', think that one has to drive in a 'special manner' for a driving test.

This is not the case.

The Examiner is looking for [in the case of Cat B] a reasonable standard of competence. The Candidate is expected to exercise a thorough, working knowledge of the Highway Code.

The Candidate should be able to demonstrate they can 'keep up with the flow of traffic, if safe to do so'...this is an assessment of competence, not a 'rule' which must forever more be complied with.

For CAt B, the candidate must demonstrate they can park their vehicle properly. They must also demonstrate they can follow their intended route[road signage]..

I note above, a question regarding 'effective observation?' [ie, what constitutes 'effective observation?]......if a candidate fails to demonstrate effective observation,. they will receive drivng faults..perhaps a serious fault [test fail]...So, what do you lot think is meant by 'effective observation?'

Coming up with the excuse, 'I didn't see them' is the result of ineffective observation...so where do you think you will look before proceeding?

Is there anywhere you don't think you have to look?

There is also much misunderstanding by candidates , of what they have heard in instruction.

Any Instructor will know, there is a huge difference between why the candidate thinks they have failed, and what the Examiner says they have failed on.

The example of a novice driver 'drivng to the speed limit, ''because my instructor said so'' is a classic example of a lack of comprehension of that aspect, where, and why it was said, etc.

There are books in WH Smiths..usually near to the Highway Code, which outline the DVSA syllabus for each test category.


Driving test rules? - RT

It always amazes me how many people who 'drive', think that one has to drive in a 'special manner' for a driving test.

You do

- it's driving safely with consideration for other road users - the requirement is to drive in that special way for the rest of your life.

Driving test rules? - P3t3r

It always amazes me how many people who 'drive', think that one has to drive in a 'special manner' for a driving test.

This is not the case.


There are some things that cannot be done during the test such as straight lining roundabouts. I think my instructors were really bad. After reading various things, I think they were probably wrong about some things.

Driving test rules? - Bromptonaut

There are some things that cannot be done during the test such as straight lining roundabouts. I think my instructors were really bad. After reading various things, I think they were probably wrong about some things.

They were teaching you to pass the test, a 30 minute observed drive. It's really not worth getting too tied up in the detail of what you were told to do for those 30minutes.

Once you've passed the test the world is your oyter and you can mi Roadraft with IAM guide and your own observations, in my case that means hoping cyclists have read Cyclecraft but assuming they have not!

Driving test rules? - alastairq

<<<There are some things that cannot be done during the test such as straight lining roundabouts. I think my instructors were really bad. After reading various things, I think they were probably wrong about some thing>>>>

Providing the driver has conducted, and acted upon, all therequisite observations

prior to deciding to negotiate a roundabout in the manner you describe.....and

providing no other road user could be, or is, affected by the intended action you

describe, and it is seen to be a reasonable course of action, nothing would be '

said' by the Examiner.

Get any part of that preamble wrong, a negotiate the roundabout as you suggest,

then one could expect a 'serious fault.

The nub of the matter, for you as an inexperienced driver is.....how likley are you to

get it wrong?

Edited by alastairq on 04/01/2015 at 19:58

Driving test rules? - P3t3r

Get any part of that preamble wrong, a negotiate the roundabout as you suggest,

then one could expect a 'serious fault.

The nub of the matter, for you as an inexperienced driver is.....how likley are you to

get it wrong?

Actually, I wasn't an inexperienced driver. I recently did the motorcycle test as an experienced driver and a rider with over 12 months experience riding with L-plates. I guess these things aren't really a problem for new drivers.

Instructors certainly won't let you straight line roundabouts etc.

 

Ask Honest John

Value my car