Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Stanb Sevento

I've used the odd tank of premium diesel for years but since the VW scandel I've used more of it and for the last few months nothing but V Power+Nitro diesel. Over time a couple of things have changed.

Firstly my DPF is not doing any active regenerations, none in 2500 miles, this is my third DPF car so I know the symptoms. My driving has not change and most of the miles were in cold weather when its usually at its worst.

Secondly the car is holding on to higher gears down to lower speeds under load. Its a DSG car and must have a Knock sensor with input to the DSG box. A regular route over a bridge a mile long with a 50mph limit, before when going up the incline if the speed droped below 49mph the car changed down to 5th, Now the speed needs to drop to 45mph before it changes down.

Cant think of any other reason or explanation for this other than fuel. Fuel ecomomy is improving but thats as likley to be temperatures rising so cant really say.

Maybe I've not been waisting my money , I will keep going with it anyway.

Edited by Stanb Sevento on 16/03/2017 at 09:24

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - piggy

Careful!! You`ll have Skidpan rushing out of his tent again. :)

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - FP

Tent?

Cave, more like.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - craig-pd130

In my 2011 Volvo V60 D3 (163bhp). I did a test of 10 consecutive tankfuls of Shell V-Power (i.e. about 6000 miles over 6 months using no other fuel than V-Power), and compared with the 10 previous tankfuls of Shell's ordinary Fuelsave (easy for me to do, as Shell is my nearest filling station and the same price as the local supermarkets).

I got a brim-to-brim average of 46.29 on V-Power compared with 45.12 on Fuelsave. The V60 at that time was a thoroughly modern common-rail turbodiesel with DPF, etc.

To express it in percentages, I got a 2.6% improvement in economy, which offset about half of the extra 5.7% cost of V-Power (it was 8p per litre more than the standard stuff at the time).

There was no detectable difference in performance at all between the two fuels. I concluded that for me, while V-Power made a small difference to economy, it wasn't worth paying the extra for, compared with the ordinary, cheaper Fuelsave diesel.

You pays your money and makes your choice.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Stanb Sevento

I agree craig-pd130 that if there is an improvement in economy its small and not worth it for that reason alone, but I started using it when the stories of clogged EGR valves and problems with DPF started to emerge with the VW scandel. Claims of cleaner combustion with less soot were the attraction and Im begining to think there is something in it with the reduced DPF regenerations.

The only driving effect I notice is the pulling down to lower revs before you need to change down. I only noticed it because I do this route so regularly, going up an incling with a 50 limit if it was a 40 or 60 limit I'd likely not notice, its right around the gear change point.

I filled up yesterday and went into pay, joking with the lady dehind the counter about throwing away more of my money buying the dear stuff she said " well there must be something in it the Taxi drivers are our biggest customers.

Edited by Stanb Sevento on 17/03/2017 at 09:47

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Andrew-T

The only driving effect I notice is the pulling down to lower revs before you need to change down.

Is it good for the engine to exploit this behaviour? The old rule used to be never to ask the engine to 'labour' ?

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - gordonbennet

Is it good for the engine to exploit this behaviour? The old rule used to be never to ask the engine to 'labour' ?

Wasn't that during running in, part of the pleasure of old school Diesel onwership used to be that you hardly used the gearstick because they could pull right down to tickover revs, in lorry world (when we had proper engines, Galileo? you'll know where i'm looking) the rule was to let it lug.

Interesting findings, since i got the present Landcruiser a few months ago it's been treated to Millers fuel additive in a healthy allowed double dose in every tankful, its running better than when i bought it, quieter lacking the previous Diesel rattle, though that could possibly be helped by the better engine oil it now enjoys, pulling better, they're always instant starters, not a trace of smoke no matter how much welly it gets, but most noticeable is how, as above, even with the torque converter auto box by balancing the throttle carefully the vehicle will stay in high gears right down to around 1300rpm and still pulling cleanly and gently with just a trace of turbo whistle (you can always hear these engines spool up, my early 90's version before d4d was just the same) as it goes under power, obviously as you increase the throttle it seeks lower gears, but even on quite steep hills it will climb them quite happily at 1500 rpm all the way in top.

It didn't behave like this when i first got it, so somethings happening, oh and the oil is now finally starting to turn black at around a thousand miles after the last change, i wonder if the injectors and combustion area carbon are gradually cleaning up, in the summer i'll probably remove the EGR and have a poke nose, its a simple enough job on these, don't for one minute think my 'snake oil' is doing the impossible.

MIllers in supermarket fuel fad is my cheapskate version of the better DERV.

Fuel consumption hasn't varied much if at all, a 2+ ton brick with permanent 4WD is never going to return 40 mpg in a month of Sundays.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Andrew-T

<< Wasn't that during running in, part of the pleasure of old school Diesel onwership used to be that you hardly used the gearstick because they could pull right down to tickover revs, in lorry world the rule was to let it lug. >>

Yes, one nice thing with my diesel Pug is that on the odd occasion when I get in a M'way crawl, if it's at about 5mph I can keep up by letting the motor idle in bottom gear. But I never ask it to 'work' at idle speed. Of course it is easier to stall a small diesel than one in a wagon?

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - gordonbennet

Yes, one nice thing with my diesel Pug is that on the odd occasion when I get in a M'way crawl, if it's at about 5mph I can keep up by letting the motor idle in bottom gear. But I never ask it to 'work' at idle speed. Of course it is easier to stall a small diesel than one in a wagon?

If only, not any more, they're just as temperamental, coupled with the automated manual gearbox from hell have a real possibilty of stalling on steepening hills when the unfit for purpose (so many are) gearbox can't keep up with deceleration, and some companies actually program out manual override, that's suits with no idea by the way.

So many lorry engines are just like their car engine counterparts, no guts.

Two engines stand out in my mind that you had to really try hard to stall at all, 1 was the Cummins 14 litre lorry engine (''let it lug'') and the other was my early 90's Landcruiser 3.0 litre 4 pot, still on mechanical pump, these things would climb the side of a house before they would stall out.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - RobJP

Two engines stand out in my mind that you had to really try hard to stall at all, 1 was the Cummins 14 litre lorry engine (''let it lug'') and the other was my early 90's Landcruiser 3.0 litre 4 pot, still on mechanical pump, these things would climb the side of a house before they would stall out.

Others would include the 3.1 Isuzu Trooper diesel (also a 4 pot), that would seemingly idle it's way up a cliff, and the 2.5 Mitsubishi diesel fitted in out Shogun Sport. Get above 25 mph and put it into 5th, and leave it there. Put it into low box and second, and I've been known to drag a chain harrow over the (very) hilly fields with it.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - gordonbennet

Others would include the 3.1 Isuzu Trooper diesel (also a 4 pot), that would seemingly idle it's way up a cliff, and the 2.5 Mitsubishi diesel fitted in out Shogun Sport. Get above 25 mph and put it into 5th, and leave it there. Put it into low box and second, and I've been known to drag a chain harrow over the (very) hilly fields with it.

Never had much to do with either, but hardly surprises me, very conservative the Japanese with their industrial use vehicles, if it aint broke don't fix it school of design.

As a slight aside i've never worked out why Toyota didn't push Hino trucks more in this country, as we lost Brit makers (who fitted well proven tough as old boots engines and boxes from proven suppliers) Hino were IMHO the obvious replacement with thier tough simple durable and very reliable designs, in places where reliable counts they are as well regarded as usual Japanese 4x4's.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Wackyracer

As a slight aside i've never worked out why Toyota didn't push Hino trucks more in this country, as we lost Brit makers (who fitted well proven tough as old boots engines and boxes from proven suppliers) Hino were IMHO the obvious replacement with thier tough simple durable and very reliable designs, in places where reliable counts they are as well regarded as usual Japanese 4x4's.

That is a very good point. As far as I can remember, all the Hino trucks I've seen on the UK roads have been 8 leg tipper's.

My old IDI Citroen can pull away by just lifting the clutch, The more modern common rail Vauxhall can be stalled as easily as a meagre little petrol engine (especially if the air con is on).

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Wackyracer

Is it good for the engine to exploit this behaviour? The old rule used to be never to ask the engine to 'labour' ?

Wasn't that during running in, part of the pleasure of old school Diesel onwership used to be that you hardly used the gearstick because they could pull right down to tickover revs, in lorry world (when we had proper engines, Galileo? you'll know where i'm looking) the rule was to let it lug.

When we got our first batch of FM12 units 17 years ago Volvo instructed us to let the engine work at lower revs. They were much more powerful than the FL10's and the 1834's they were replacing.

though that could possibly be helped by the better engine oil it now enjoys.

Millers Trident?

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - gordonbennet
Millers Trident?

Trident all gone, been on Morris Multivis 5w40 fully synthetic, Shell Helix Ultra 5w40 in due course, stock rotation doncha know :-).

I begged them to keep my FL12 380 (now that was a rarity) cos that super low cab cut down even lower and the chuckability of the FL series provided me with a cracking 10 car transporter, get rid of just two cars and could get it down to under 13' 9" especially if i extended it to about 65ft, don't tell 'em Pike, made multi drop work a doddle, plus being a full size prime mover wag n drag it just laughed at snow.

You can have fond memories of any working tool i suppose, no doubt other posters had tools of whatever their trade which they wish they could have kept indefinately, and which the modern replacements just don't match up to.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Stanb Sevento

Is it good for the engine to exploit this behaviour? I dont believe theres any problem Andrew. The knock sensor is sensative listening device that detects the onset of, would you believe it knocking, or vibration and retards the fuel timing and in my case send a message to the gearbox to change down. So there is no labouring, infact its creamy smooth.

In a petrol car the ignition timing is retarded and maybe the fuel as well I dont know but its ther to allow the car to run on every grade of fuel its likley to meet. Lots of different recipies for what is called diesel. You can often see the knock sensor, less than half the size of a match box bolted directly to the middle of the engine block with a singal cable. The ECU goes through a recalibration periodicaly to keep it up to date with the current fuel in use so it can take a good few miles to adjust for better fuel.

Edited by Stanb Sevento on 17/03/2017 at 15:24

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Manatee

Over time a couple of things have changed.

Firstly my DPF is not doing any active regenerations, .

That makes sense to me, Shell V Power diesel is made from gas, whether in whole or in part I'm not sure. Ordinary diesel is essentially a cut of crude oil and encompasses a variety of hydrocarbons and associated crud not found in gas form.

My old Outlander used to regen about every 300 miles on ordinary+Millers; it was nearer every 600 on V Power. I dared to hope that this meant the DPF would last longer, and the engine, especially injectors, would stay cleaner

I'm still using it in the replacement car. I can't say I have detected any mpg benefit.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - craig-pd130

That makes sense to me, Shell V Power diesel is made from gas, whether in whole or in part I'm not sure.

When they introduced it, Shell stated that V-Power was a blend of around 10% gas-to-liquid (GTL) content, and the rest refined conventionally with additives. They don't state this any more on their website - whether that's because they've changed the formula, or just simplified the marketing blurb isn't clear.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Manatee

I've never seen a percentage stated, must have missed that. 10% doesn't sound enough to make a major or noticeable difference. It's quite noticeable though, to me, that the diesel smell is almost absent from V-Power diesel.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Stanb Sevento

Well car did an active regen after 1650 miles, triggerd by a series of 3 mile trips. The day after the short stops it started regenerating as soon as it got to temperature ( 75 deg C ) and had completed by the end of a 10 mile run at 50 mph, fan ran on a minute but idle speed down at normal. No more regen on return trip.

Much web digging on fuel uncoverd a bit of info. Standard diesel 51 cetain, Shell v power 53 cetain and v power+nitro 55 cetain. Tesco use BP addatives. Take from this what you choose.

I like this snake oil.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - craig-pd130

Much web digging on fuel uncoverd a bit of info. Standard diesel 51 cetain, Shell v power 53 cetain and v power+nitro 55 cetain. Tesco use BP addatives. Take from this what you choose.

It's not quite as clear-cut as that. Shell's own material data sheet for its 'ordinary' Fuelsave diesel states that while the fuel is guaranteed to meet the BS EN590 standard of 51 cetane, its typical measured cetane number is 53 - 55.

If the VPN+ stuff is working for you, that's great.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Andrew-T

Much web digging on fuel uncoverd a bit of info. Standard diesel 51 cetain, Shell v power 53 cetain and v power+nitro 55 cetain. Tesco use BP addatives. Take from this what you choose.

It's not quite as clear-cut as that. Shell's own material data sheet for its 'ordinary' Fuelsave diesel states that while the fuel is guaranteed to meet the BS EN590 standard of 51 cetane, its typical measured cetane number is 53 - 55.

If the VPN+ stuff is working for you, that's great.

Last week I tried 10 litres of this 'superdiesel' for the first time ever, as the tank was getting low, just to see what happened. Didn't expect any better consumption (and couldn't detect it anyway with that amount) but the engine certainly ran more smoothly and quietly, and gear changes seemed to be better synchronised. I've topped up with normal since, but the improvement hasn't worn off yet.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Engineer Andy

I've also tried 'super' fuel a couple of times (at different times of the year) for two fill ups each time and noticed no difference in fuel economy or feel of the engine or gear changes.

Whilst the additional detergents of the more expensive fuels from Shell etc probably do the engine some good, if the car (as mine is) does a wide range of driving, including a reasonable amount on fast moving roads, then the effect will not be anywhere near as significant as if I was only doing urban driving and/or short journeys (which I rarely do).

My Mazda3 (1.6 petrol) does not have a knock sensor. As such, I'll probably stick to standard fuels, and use ordinary Shell or equivalent major brand that has the extra detergents once in a while when the price difference isn't so much to supermarket fuel (I keep an eye on PetrolPrices.com), and perhaps when I fill up to go on holiday (given its a long journey to the West Country).

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - skidpan

and gear changes seemed to be better synchronised.

If its a manual fuel can make no difference at all to gear changes.

If its an auto I cannot honestly see how supposed better fuel can affect the gearbox since you don't put petrol in it.

Spent more so it must be better.

Its all in the mind.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Andrew-T

I was going to reply to Skidpan, but after a moment's thought I won't bother, as he is essentially accusing me of hallucinating. He can't see any reason for a change (perhaps I can't to be honest) but the running of the car was definitely altered for the better. I'll leave it at that. I tried the stuff as an experiment, and I'm not a person who believes that spending more is always a good idea.

On the other hand, he tells us how often he spends on oil and other consumables, which is his way of lashing out, while others here might say it is unnecessary.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - RT

I was going to reply to Skidpan, but after a moment's thought I won't bother, as he is essentially accusing me of hallucinating. He can't see any reason for a change (perhaps I can't to be honest) but the running of the car was definitely altered for the better. I'll leave it at that. I tried the stuff as an experiment, and I'm not a person who believes that spending more is always a good idea.

On the other hand, he tells us how often he spends on oil and other consumables, which is his way of lashing out, while others here might say it is unnecessary.

Modern engines are so electronically-managed I don't see how it's possible to detect changes in running due just to the fuel.

Petrol cars run better in humid conditions - petrol and diesel cars may run better with a shot of Millers, or similar, in the tank (depends how "dirty" the injectors were) - temperature and air pressure can affect engine running - I don't see how those other variable can be eliminated except in a laboratory.

I just ask myself why those selling products claiming specific improvements never publish independent laboratory results to prove it.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - John F

Even if the complex electronic engine management system senses the more expensive fuel and alters the feel of the car 'for the better', it is craig-130pd's argument that persuades me that it's not worth it. I have always used supermarket fuel but some time ago I did a brim to brim comparison of 95 ron versus 'super' 98 ron for a petrol, not diesel, engine and found that the percentage saving in fuel consumption was not enough to offset the percentage increase in cost. I noticed no difference in the 'feel' of the engine with the more expensive fuel.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Stanb Sevento

This post was not about petrol or trying to persuad anyone to use anything. It is about my using V Power + nitro diesel prompted by some horror stories of blocked ERG valves and my attempting to minimise the problem. If the number of active DPF regenerations is anything to go by it has done that with flying colours, any improvement in how the car drives is just an unexpected bonus.. Im not too bothered by fuel consumption, it is what it is and any attempt to try and measure it with any accurasy would be a nightmare and probably beyond the scope of most individuals. Ambiant temperature, wind speed, the number of acceleration / decelorations to name a few are beyond my abilities to factor in.

If the only criteria is miles per £ then cheapest is likely the best

Edited by Stanb Sevento on 20/04/2017 at 13:40

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Andrew-T

Even if the complex electronic engine management system senses the more expensive fuel and alters the feel of the car 'for the better', it is craig-130pd's argument that persuades me that it's not worth it.

Modern engines are so electronically-managed I don't see how it's possible to detect changes in running due just to the fuel.

If by 'worth it' you mean that the extra cost of the fuel is not recovered as reduced consumption, I'm sure you're right, and others above would agree. If you find that driving the car feels better, that may make it 'worth it' to you personally.

Equally, 'detecting changes' may only be possible through the seat of the pants rather than any scientific measurement. I am satisfied that the familiar behaviour of my diesel engine changed - not greatly, but noticeably - immediately after a 10-litre dose of this particular snake-oil. Perhaps it cleaned the injectors or affected the EGR valve?

It might be interesting to see if the emissions-test results were any different from my recent MoT test. I always add a shot of injector cleaner before that, but maybe this snake-oil is more effective?

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Andrew-T

As an afterthought, someone on Pistonheads suggests that standard diesel in the EU has to contain some bio- while premium diesel doesn't. That might have a noticeable effect too ?

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - gordonbennet

As an afterthought, someone on Pistonheads suggests that standard diesel in the EU has to contain some bio- while premium diesel doesn't. That might have a noticeable effect too ?

That i didn't know, if that can be confirmed i'll not be supermarketing any more and will make a point of using the good stuff, will still carry on with me good old Millers for that belt and braces approach.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - RT

As an afterthought, someone on Pistonheads suggests that standard diesel in the EU has to contain some bio- while premium diesel doesn't. That might have a noticeable effect too ?

The EU mandate relates to the overall amount of fuel produced, capped at a maximum of 6%, but doesn't apply to specify fuel supplies.

Like many cars, my diesel VW has a big sticker on the fuel cap stating "No Bio-diesel"

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Engineer Andy

As an afterthought, someone on Pistonheads suggests that standard diesel in the EU has to contain some bio- while premium diesel doesn't. That might have a noticeable effect too ?

I thought the EU regs were that ALL diesel and petrol fuels available to the public had to have a certain minimum percentage (5%?) biofuel content? Personally its just as bad as using 100% standard fuel for the environment, not because it necessarily emits more nasty gases, but because it takes up agricultural land to produce that could've been used to produce food.

Better for all the research funding etc to have been spent on helping to improve fuel efficiency in vehicles, and especially aircraft and ships, including more in alternative propulsion methods and fuels (such as fuel cells). All using biofuels it does is line the pockets of companies making them and repair shops because vehicles don't run so well on them as 100% diesel and petrol.

Fair point from the OP about the original preimse - I thought )perhaps wrongly - I've ever driven a diesel car when I was learning to drive and once as a hire car since, so don't pay much attention to the name of the fuel - it looked similar to the Shell Superunleaded equivalent. If modern complex diesel cars find running on such super-grade fuels far better, especially if they are used for shorter/more urban journeys, then I'm all for it, especially if their use reduces emissions (especially of those causing respiratory problems, which I suffer from when I've regularly worked in big towns/cities).

I think all vehicles should have knock sensors or suchlike to take advantage of whatever grade of fuel you put in them - I doubt if they'd cost more than a couple of hundred quid and would probably save quite a bit over the life of the vehicle if set up right. Again, this could be legislated for at little expense (if any) to the average Joe in the street.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - RT
I think all vehicles should have knock sensors or suchlike to take advantage of whatever grade of fuel you put in them - I doubt if they'd cost more than a couple of hundred quid and would probably save quite a bit over the life of the vehicle if set up right. Again, this could be legislated for at little expense (if any) to the average Joe in the street.

Virtually all petrol cars have had knock sensors for 20 years, some more like 30.

The potential variation in Cetane level doesn't have the same effect in diesels as the Octane level in petrols - technically all diesels knock anyway because they're designed for compression-ignition

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Engineer Andy
I think all vehicles should have knock sensors or suchlike to take advantage of whatever grade of fuel you put in them - I doubt if they'd cost more than a couple of hundred quid and would probably save quite a bit over the life of the vehicle if set up right. Again, this could be legislated for at little expense (if any) to the average Joe in the street.

Virtually all petrol cars have had knock sensors for 20 years, some more like 30.

The potential variation in Cetane level doesn't have the same effect in diesels as the Octane level in petrols - technically all diesels knock anyway because they're designed for compression-ignition

Are you sure? I can well understand for higher-performance cars that specifically state they are designed to take 98Ron+ petrol, but I wasn't aware the 'virtually all' petrol-driven cars were, especially as (I believed) Japanese cars (not performance models) were primarily designed to run on 95Ron and sometimes lower, but not higher, like my Mazda3 and my former Micra K11.

Given previous threads where large numbers of members have categorically stated that after using superunleaded they noticed no difference in mpg and/or performance, I'm not sure your statement is entirely correct. Anyway, a discussion perhaps for another day and thread.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Stanb Sevento

Are you sure? I can well understand for higher-performance cars that specifically state they are designed to take 98Ron+ petrol, but I wasn't aware the 'virtually all' petrol-driven cars were, especially as (I believed) Japanese cars (not performance models) were primarily designed to run on 95Ron and sometimes lower, but not higher, like my Mazda3 and my former Micra K11.

Given previous threads where large numbers of members have categorically stated that after using superunleaded they noticed no difference in mpg and/or performance, I'm not sure your statement is entirely correct. Anyway, a discussion perhaps for another day and thread.

If you are anything like as old as me Andy you will remember the old distributers with vacuum advance and the centrifugal weights. When these started disappearing the knock sensors became common, they were easy to see, small box roughly 3x2x1 cm, bolted to the block. Part of their purpose was to protect the engine so its perfectly possible that even if a car has a knock sensor its not set up to exploit different fuels it will need the program in the ECU. The first time I remember actually seeing one was on a mk3 Golf whenever that was. That could explain why some get a benefit and some dont. It took ages before I was awair of any effect, could be as much as 200 miles.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - RT
I think all vehicles should have knock sensors or suchlike to take advantage of whatever grade of fuel you put in them - I doubt if they'd cost more than a couple of hundred quid and would probably save quite a bit over the life of the vehicle if set up right. Again, this could be legislated for at little expense (if any) to the average Joe in the street.

Virtually all petrol cars have had knock sensors for 20 years, some more like 30.

The potential variation in Cetane level doesn't have the same effect in diesels as the Octane level in petrols - technically all diesels knock anyway because they're designed for compression-ignition

Are you sure? I can well understand for higher-performance cars that specifically state they are designed to take 98Ron+ petrol, but I wasn't aware the 'virtually all' petrol-driven cars were, especially as (I believed) Japanese cars (not performance models) were primarily designed to run on 95Ron and sometimes lower, but not higher, like my Mazda3 and my former Micra K11.

Given previous threads where large numbers of members have categorically stated that after using superunleaded they noticed no difference in mpg and/or performance, I'm not sure your statement is entirely correct. Anyway, a discussion perhaps for another day and thread.

Regular unleaded is 95 RON minimum - it may be higher and the MON won't necessarily have the same relationship - fuel blending is highly complex. After blending, distribution and standing in a car's fuel tank in hot weather, the fuel may not even be 98 RON but it's a normal variation so cars are designed to cope.

Petrol cars achieve their best economy when the ignition it timed just before the knock point - that point varies according to the engine load and variations in fuel - the easy way to achieve that is to electronically advance the ignition until the signs of imminent knock are detected and then back off a little, it's a continuous process occuring several times a minute.

Vauxhall fitted their engines with knock sensors in the '90s when cats became mandatory - they weren't market leaders so I assume everyone else did as well.

The use of knock sensors is how cars can be fuelled with 98 RON super unleaded and get more power, the engine adjusts automatically.

Japanes grey imports are a special case - they're designed for 101+ RON and some can't adjust down far enough to suit 98 RON.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Stanb Sevento

Its perfectly possible that fuel can effect how the auto gearbox works., infact I believe Ive experienced first hand, finding it holding on to higher gear down to lower speeds. A DSG gearbox is electronicaly controled and has inputs like engine temperature so a hot engine changes up sooner than a cold one. It also changes down on long downhill sections when the car is gaining speed when foot off the gas to give some engine braking. They are clever things so its not hard to believe that it can take account of better fuel via a knock sensor.

Edited by Stanb Sevento on 20/04/2017 at 20:31

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - boggles
One of the major causes of gradual power loss, on modern diesels, is zinc contamination. Modern fuels "leech" zinc from the galvanised pipes and tanks of filling stations. V-power is pretty much impervious to zinc, and will also remove deposits left by previous fuels in the injector nozzles.
This is one of the reasons for perceived better performance, after maybe a quarter tank of it.
I am retired now, and don't know what improvements were made, when v-power became nitro +.
I was involved in the testing of the original v-power, and have seen some impressive results, from test bed engines. This could be running an engine on low quality fuel, until the power dropped off. Then change to v-power and running the same one hour power curve cycle, see full power restored in about three hours.
I have run engines on v-power that has been adulterated with 2% zinc, this caused no power loss.
The other big name premium fuels treated the same, were not quite as good.
This problem goes away with modern facilities, where stainless tanks and pipes are used, but the v-power will always keep the fuel system clean, to maintain performance and minimise dpf regens.
I shall continue to use it.
Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - RT

Its perfectly possible that fuel can effect how the auto gearbox works., infact I believe Ive experienced first hand, finding it holding on to higher gear down to lower speeds. A DSG gearbox is electronicaly controled and has inputs like engine temperature so a hot engine changes up sooner than a cold one. It also changes down on long downhill sections when the car is gaining speed when foot off the gas to give some engine braking. They are clever things so its not hard to believe that it can take account of better fuel via a knock sensor.

Knock sensor is irrelevant to diesels - Cetane doesn't work the same way on diesels as Octane works on petrols.

All modern automatics are electronically controlled - not just DCTs

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Stanb Sevento

Knock sensor is irrelevant to diesels - Cetane doesn't work the same way on diesels as Octane works on petrols.

All modern automatics are electronically controlled - not just DCTs

No its not, a knock sensor is very relevent to diesel it just works in a different way. In petrol it changes the timing of the spark on diesel it changes the timing and shape of the fuel injection. They dont fit them for fun. In the past diesel tuners would advance the injection to extract more power and just suffer the noise.

Edited by Stanb Sevento on 20/04/2017 at 23:26

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - glidermania

I ran a 2002 BMW E46 320d Sport on 'supermarket' diesel for over 217,000 before I sold it in 2015 without any issue. Never once did it fail the emission test. The car is still on the road.

The Board Computer regularly showed low 60's mpg and I filled neck to neck. When the swirl flaps were taken out at around 95000 miles, they were clean. Nuff said.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - Stanb Sevento

I ran a 2002 BMW E46 320d Sport on 'supermarket' diesel for over 217,000 before I sold it in 2015 without any issue. Never once did it fail the emission test. The car is still on the road.

The Board Computer regularly showed low 60's mpg and I filled neck to neck. When the swirl flaps were taken out at around 95000 miles, they were clean. Nuff said.

Dont doubt you for a second but that was EURO3 standard that had no DPF, no particulates standard and 100 times the permitted NOx that is allowed now. Different world back then.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - the_bandit

Shell are launching the next incarnation of V-Power on 27.4.17.

Snake oil that seems to work! V Power + Nitro - mss1tw
I will admit to using premium unleaded in my work scooter - it does over 100 miles a day into London and back and works hard lugging my tools at *ahem* MPH up the A3, then a mix of stop/start traffic, and short trips to wholesalers.
 

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