Toyota GT86 (2012) Review

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Toyota GT86 (2012) At A Glance

4/5

+Hugely enjoyable and involving to drive. Great amounts of grip and superb handling. Free-revving 2.0-litre non-turbo engine produces 200PS. Low rev torque improves for 2017 MY.

-Cabin lacking in quality. Not suited to sitting in busy traffic. Poor torque up to 2016.

New prices start from £28,275
Contract hire deals from £280.61 per month
Insurance Groups are between 29–35
On average it achieves 100% of the official MPG figure

Since the demise of the Celica and the MR2, Toyota hasn't had a sports car. Which has been a real shame for a brand with a strong past in driver-focussed cars. In recent years Toyota has become better known for reliable and worthy cars like the Avensis and Auris.

But there's not been much to get excited about. Now that's changed with the GT86 - a sports coupe in the best traditions of Toyota.

It's actually been co-developed with Subaru which has its own version, the BRZ. Aside from the badge on the bonnet both are pretty much identical. The big surprise is that despite the current trend for turbocharged engines, the GT86 and BRZ use the same naturally aspirated 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine developing 200PS.

It's an engine which does need to be worked hard to get the best out of it, but that only adds to the old-school sports car feel.

That's not to say it's gutless at low revs but with only a moderate 205Nm of torque which peaks at the top of the rev range it's clear that this is designed as proper driver's car. The light weight helps with performance - 0-62mph takes 7.6 seconds - and the lovely short shifting six-speed manual is a delight to use.

It handles superbly, helped by the rear-wheel drive set-up, with responsive and direct steering, great body control and huge amounts of grip. It's a car that really inspires confidence but more importantly is huge fun to drive. So while there may be other coupes that are quicker, nothing feels as enjoyable as the GT86. True it doesn't feel the most modern of sports cars, especially inside, but that only adds to its appeal.

Toyota GT86 2012 Road Test

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Real MPG average for a Toyota GT86 (2012)

RealMPG

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

100%

Real MPG

27–43 mpg

MPGs submitted

106

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

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Ask Honest John

Is there a two-seater sports car that has room behind for a small dog?
"Many years ago I drove an MGB GT which was basically two seats plus a shelf, but handy for a small dog. I now am looking for a more up to date sporty soft top car with similar features. What do you recommend? I'm keen on the Mazda MX-5, but there is no room and certainly no space behind the seats."
Unfortunately, I think you might have to look at something slightly bigger, like a BMW 2 Series Convertible, to have the space you require. Alternatively, consider a Toyota GT86 - it's more practical yet as fun to drive as an MX-5, but isn't available as a convertible.
Answered by Andrew Brady
What's the best car with a naturally aspirated engine?
"I am looking for a car with a naturally aspirated engine as I dislike all turbo ones. My favourite is a Toyota GT86 - are there any other ones for under £15k"
Mazda takes the naturally-aspirated route with its petrol engines. The Mazda MX-5 is a good alternative to the GT86 and has the bonus of a convertible roof.
Answered by Andrew Brady
What can you recommend to replace my Toyota MR2?
"I have a much loved Toyota MR2 which has just been written off. As I am now in my mid-60s I feel a higher car with power steering is probably the way to go. My MR2 is automatic and I would like another automatic with with good rear visibility. I have up to £10,000 to spend - what would you recommend that might by fun?"
It depends how important the 'fun to drive' aspect is. I want to recommend a Toyota GT86 as it's a lot of fun, but there aren't many about for £10,000 and it's not particularly high up, even compared to an MR2. A MINI Hatch might be a good choice. They're great to drive and your budget will get you a sporty Cooper S from around 2012. You might also like a Volkswagen Golf GTI with the DSG automatic gearbox. If you're after something a bit more sensible, the Honda Jazz is surprisingly good to drive and offers excellent practicality.
Answered by Andrew Brady
What car cover do you recommend?
"My Toyota GT86 is parked outside in all weathers and it's getting bombarded with bird droppings. Would you recommend a car cover? If so, what brand or features would you look for?"
Breathability is important when you're buying a car cover because moisture trapped under a cover can damage the paintwork. But you generally want something that's easy to use, fits well and will be secure in high winds. It comes down to whether you want something cheap that does the job or a cover that offers a bit more quality. I'd recommend the Halfords all-seasons car cover, but it pricier than a lot of the alternatives you'll see on Amazon. The Oxgord car cover is also well-rated. Aside from the actual cover, there are some things to bear in mind about covering a car. Don't put a cover on a wet or dirty car, it needs to breathe. Likewise, don't keep the cover on for days at a time. If the cover becomes saturated with water, then stays on the car, the water can get into the paint. Then when it gets warmer, blisters can appear in the paintwork. Also, try to find a loose fitting car cover, tight fitting covers don't let the air circulate - which is essential.
Answered by Georgia Petrie

What does a Toyota GT86 (2012) cost?


Contract hire from £280.61 per month