Speed Bumps - Simon
Just outside the Leeds outer ring road the council have made a series of speed humps. The situation is that the approach is from a 40 zone, a long straight road of about half a mile. At the end of this straight is a bend where it changes to a 30 zone. 50 yrds within the 30 sign is the first of three long sausage-style bumps have been created.

The first time I encountered these was the day after creation, and tried negotiating them at 30mph, thinking that they were to slow vehicles down to the stated speed. The car was not very composed, suspension struts were heard to bang violently, and I thought serious damage was very likely!

The subsequent two were taken gingerly at 20, and even this seemed a violent jolt. I put this down to their newness, thinking the council would come back to paint them properly etc, and round of the steep angles on the sides.

It is now six weeks since then, and I have found that 15mph is about the maximum speed that these homps can be mounted at without the fear of damage to a vehicle.

Is this legal? There is no school to warrant 15mph. I do not mind driving at 30 in a 30 zone. But I am being forced to do 15 to save my car. Is there any specified dimensions for these humps, and what can Joe Public do if the council has not adhered to them?

Simon
Re: Speed Bumps - stuart bruce
Hi Simon,

We had a short but unfortunately inconclusive discussion about this a few weeks back.

If you search for title Rumble strips you will find it. At the time, as you will read in that thread, I had a good look through the Design Manual Roads & Bridges because I could not believe that the information would not be in there somewhere. However my brain gave up before I found it, its certainly not mentioned in the index and since then I forgot to look elsewhere. (Trying to twist too many threads to Citröens?) In the belief that the answer to most things can be found in the Internet I will look again as its something I would like to know also, but they say two or more brains are better than one, or in my case today half a brain long day!

Certainly if you can prove that the council have erred in their installation, either in the planning procedure or the actual design of the humps they have to be removed or modified, there is a precedent, I forget where exactly, somewhere in Gtr London I think, but its a guess.

Regards,
Stuart
Re: Speed Bumps - Tom Shaw
The figures escape me, but I have seen somewhere that there is indeed a maximum permitted height for speed humps.

(Possibly 27cm?)
Re: Spelling AGAIN! - stuart bruce
Sorry, apologies to David Woollard, in trying to be a smart arse I meant Citroën. Got me umlauts in t'wrong hole.
Re: Its here! - stuart bruce
Sorry please ignore all prev BS, found it!

www.roads.detr.gov.uk/roadnetwork/ditm/tal/traffic.../

It states between 50 + 100 mm, loads about shape positioning etc. not read it all yet.

Tom, if you cross 27 cm road humps I have sympathies! Now I know why all those Mums in the school car park have 4x4s, thought it was for the Ribena slick.

;-)
Cheers,
S
Re: Its here! - Tom Shaw
My memory Was at fault Stuart, I've just looked at a ruler and 27cm does seem a bit high.

Have you noticed though, the more left wing the local council the higher the humps, and the greater the number.
Re: Its here! - honest john
These sort of speed humps are why suburban families are buying gigantic 4x4s. Not exactly the result the little hitlers were planning because big tyred 4x4s can be driven over humps at considerable speed and at considerable danger to everyone.

HJ
Re: Its here! - Andrew Tarr
Come on, HJ - I didn't think suburban families had any reason to buy a 4x4, other than peer pressure via their kids.
Re: Its here! - Brian
Just to repeat a previous post, my attitude is that if there is a 30 mph limit on a road, then the road should be capable of being negotiated at 30 mph in good conditions.
If the Council wants to limit traffic to 15 or 20 mph, fair enough if there is a good reason, but it should be debated, minuted, properly notified in the local press and there should be limit signs to that effect.
What we have at the moment is some bod in a Council truck effectively setting an arbitary limit without the proper statutory procedures being gone through, and is therefore probably illegal.
The risk of damage to vehicles by humps is considerable. What is more, if I am on a cycle or motorcycle they can throw me off, and even hitting one at 30 mph causes severe jarring to the spine.
Re: Its here! - Andrew Tarr
Wait till someone drops half an exhaust in the road. I remember a case at work many years ago when a cyclist hit a loose exhaust-box after dark with some discomfort, to put it mildly.
Re: Statuatory DEMOCRATIC procedure - stuart bruce
But Brian that's the point, there IS a procedure the council must follow, involving notices in the local press and posted locally allowing comments from joe public, both for and against remember, and then a proper debate.

There is a procedure and advice on how to object on the ABD's site, www.abd.org.uk/ though this is specifically about speed limits but I would guess that the procedure is none too different for humps. I have seen these adverts in the local rag, makes for a gripping read.

Re the above DETR doc if from there you go to the following you will find the statutory instrument about road humps signed by Cecil "Golden B***ocks" Parkinson no less. It includes drawings of the allowable size and shape of round and flat top humps.

The Highways (Road Humps) Regulations 1990 ( Stat Instr No 703)
www.hmso.gov.uk/si/si1990/UKsi_19900703_en_1.htm

That should be all the info & ammunition anyone needs to investigate these flaming boils on the face of the roads.
Re: Statuatory DEMOCRATIC procedure - bogush
An email I sent to the local council:

Please note that whilst carrying out further searches in the local paper I came across the following quote: "Steve Hunt, city council team leader for traffic management, said the overall aim of traffic calming in towns was to cut speeds from 30mph to 20mph".

Can you please confirm if the council's speed bumps are designed to be crossed safely at 20mph, and if so why there are no warning signs to this effect if they are in 30mph areas.


My follow up to their reply:

You advise: "A road signed as 30 mph does no necessarily mean that drivers
should proceed at that speed."

It should however mean that the ROAD can be traversed safely at 30mph all
other things being equal and that it is legal to do 30mph on that road.

Therefore, I would suggest, anyone seeing a "warning" sign for speed humps
on a 30 mph road should reasonably assume, in the absence of new speed limit
signs warning that in fact the legal speed had been reduced in that area, or
warnings of other dangers, that the humps are there to prevent speeding in
excess of 30mph, and not to prevent all driving above an arbitrary and
unpublicised lower limit below the legal speed limit, and that the signs are
there to warn of this.

You go on to say: "it is for drivers to determine what is an appropriate
speed to travel over road humps. 20 mph is appropriate in most cases."

There are two ways to determine this:

1) Cross them at increasing speeds until your suspension is damaged.

2) Ask.

Could you therefore confirm the maximum speed at which Nottingham's speed
bumps/humps/cushions etc can be driven over safely, allowing for
construction errors.


Their final reply:

I consider that I have already answered your question regarding the speed of
vehicles in traffic calmed areas.
Re: Statuatory DEMOCRATIC procedure - mike
I live in Derbyshire, and they have scant regard for applying the rule of law to decisions on highway matters. Last year my son was caught for speeding-60 in a 30. The road had always been unrestricted until new 30 signs that week. I took the precaution of checking that they had taken the correct steps to apply the new limit, and guess what? Thrown out of court. I wonder who it is that we have elected to work on our behalf. No election leaflet delivered to me by local councellors has ever said, " and I promise to be as awkward as **ll, make the roads a nightmare, and throw out every reasonable planning application which comes my way".
Sorry, I'm getting emotional now!
Mike
Re: Statutory DEMOCRATIC procedure - A Derbyshire voter
mike wrote:
>
> I live in Derbyshire, and they have scant regard for applying
> the rule of law to decisions on highway matters.

I too have my home in this county and I get a bit emotional about this. I have lived and worked here through the Bookbinder era, when, *allegedly*, because the daughter of a prominent politician got nicked for going through a red light, and after an approach by the politician the chief constable refused to squash the ticket that money was withheld from the force budget. This resulted in a situation where the force could not pay its fuel bills so could not attend incidents properly and ultimately resulted in us not getting a certificate of competence for a few years. Ultimately IMHO it ruined the chief's health, so do not get me started on left wing councils.

Also some one said that you got more humps in left wing councils, on the evidence of West Midlands I might suggest you also get worse road maintenance and roads blocked off to prevent rat runs, whiich then causes the remaining system to grid lock on a regular basis.

The last time a local politician (Philip Cousins, Labour) knocked on my door to canvass my vote, not in the last election I might add, as soon as he realised that my X was not going his way he was off down the drive and refused to debate any issues, Coward!
Re: Statutory DEMOCRATIC procedure - mike harvey
I do wish you hadn't mentioned that word B********er.! I was sitting all comfortable and relaxed, and dreadful memories and flashbacks came flooding over me. Derbyshire Supports Nuclear Free Zones roadsigns all over the place and all stationary changed to support the cause. Cost us a bomb! Never closed down department of nuclear medicine at DRI or Rolls - Royce nuclear division in Derby though, so can't have been that serious about it could they?
Mike
Re: Statutory DEMOCRATIC procedure / Debyshire mad - RichardM
As another local, have any other of you chaps driven along the main road through Wingerworth fairly recently? It has a 40 limit all along it, but about a year ago the wonderful council put in two big speed humps. On a 40 road! No speed reduction to 30 (or even 20) on this particular stretch, which would have been the logical first line of thought, just two big bl**ding humps which anyone who pays for their motoring themselves (like me) would have to negotiate at 15mph!

My biggest problem with all this is that it doesn't slow down the real lunatic element much anyway, just the more sensible ones who would most likely stick to a lower speed limit anyway if one were in force.

Crazy...
Re: Statutory DEMOCRATIC procedure / Debyshire mad - Jonathan
Solution - do you know any friendly JCB drivers?
Re: Wingerworth - Stuart B
RichardM wrote:
>
> As another local, have any other of you chaps driven along
> the main road through Wingerworth fairly recently?

No Richard not been through there for about a year since Mrs B changed her hairdressers, but I'll have a look tomorrow and report back. Small world eh!
Re: Wingerworth - mike harvey
Richard,
I've not been through Wingerworth lately either, I'm more Derby way. Have noticed a new 'chicane' on the road into Ilkeston from Derby which is bound to cause an accident or two. Other traffic calming that infuriates me are the stripey yellow lines when approaching some roundabouts. Not too bad in a car, but they should make the designers go over them on a motorcycle in the wet. Sets up frequencies in the suspension like a bucking bronco due to the short wheelbase, which almost coincides with the spacing. They're frightning, as it doesn't seem to matter what speed you hit them at, it gets worse as you slow.
Mike
Re: Wingerworth - mike harvey
Richard,
I've not been through Wingerworth lately either, I'm more Derby way. Have noticed a new 'chicane' on the road into Ilkeston from Derby which is bound to cause an accident or two. Other traffic calming that infuriates me are the stripey yellow lines when approaching some roundabouts. Not too bad in a car, but they should make the designers go over them on a motorcycle in the wet. Sets up frequencies in the suspension like a bucking bronco due to the short wheelbase, which almost coincides with the spacing. They're frightning, as it doesn't seem to matter what speed you hit them at, it gets worse as you slow.
Mike
Re: Statuatory DEMOCRATIC procedure - Andrew Tarr
It may be unfounded to assume that roads inside a 30 limit are drivable at that speed everywhere. It certainly isn't the case on open (undivided) A roads, where the limit is 60. Drivers are expected to prepare for visible hazards.
Alternatives to humps. - David Woollard
I like those little cobbles set in a section of slightly narrowed carriageway with a tiny kerb at the entry/exit.

They give a visual and audible warning but allow a normal speed passage (should you wish) without your shopping hitting the roof.

David
Re: Alternatives to humps. - bogush
"Drivers are expected to prepare for visible hazards."

But are they expected to expect councils, who's job it is to MAINTAIN the highway, to CREATE visible HAZARDS.

And if the legal limit is 30, whilst it is one thing to say that you may need to slow down to a lower speed for a child running in front of you, or to negotiate a u-bend, it's quite another to find that on a stretch of road that IS safe for 30 the council have deliberately installed hazards that will damage your car at 20.

Further, in Nottingam on one MAIN road, not only did the council install bumps, but they were so high that BUSES had to be diverted down residential streets to avoid them.

And on a residential road that the council were having to divert buses down: the speed bumps are being lowered, no doubt at great cost, to allow the buses through.

And what's the betting that when the diversion ends the bumps will be rebuilt again.

BTW you are probably talking tens of thousands rather than thousands per hump!

(As opposed to a grand for a speed sign, or a couple for an illuminated one).

But they can't afford to replace collapsing street lamps, one of which fell on a pram a while back, because they are short of cash.

Hardly surprising after they have resurfaced all the bus lanes and bus stops in cosmetic red :-(
Re: Alternatives to humps. - Andrew Bairsto
In Brasil speed humps are called lambarda after the dance of that name .Just a piece of useless info that Citroen owners come up with.
And now for a months holiday towing my caravan to the south of France
Re: Alternatives to humps. - Adam Going (Tune-Up Ltd)
Andrew,

How will we manage without you ?!!

Have a great holiday,

Adam
Re: Alternatives to humps. - Cliff Pope
These used to be called 'Sleeping Policemen'. My sister in law calls them 'Dead Policemen'

Cliff Pope
Re: Alternatives to humps. - Tom Shaw
Lucky they are not called sleeping John Prescotts - the roads would be impassible!
Re: Alternatives to humps. - Michael Thomas
My worst experience with road humps was I hit one of the elevated ramp type several years ago whilst the ramps were in 'mid-construction'. It was dark, the road had inadequate lighting, there were no signs to warn of speed humps not even any men at work signs. So I toddled down the road at 30, oblivious to any change in road surface.

I hit the first elevated ramp and I was caught completely by surprise as there were also no painted markings on the up ramp to suggest any change to road's surface. The loud bang of the supension jarring was the first warning I got, the front wheels felt like they left the road. Gravity then kicked in and the front wheels came down with another sickening thud followed by a short and loud hiss and then a grating sound (coming down off the elevated ramp).

My instant reaction was to stop as I thought I'd ran over someone.

I stopped the car and got out to realise I'd gone over a ramp. The front nearside of my car was slightly lower than the offside, the tyre was flat, I looked under the car to realise I badly scruffed the deflector plate.

Seriously hacked off, I had to call out the AA because I wasn't sure if I could drive the car home becuase I wasn't sure of any more serious damage had been caused. The AA man noticed that the shock was weeping fluid but it didn't appear too serious so I gingerly limped home on the spare.

The garage bill for a new tyre and a pair of shocks plus bushes (the impact had split the offside one) and a replacement deflector set me back £450.

Now pretty cheesed off, I had a quick chat to a solicitor during one of their 'surgery' consultations for £15. They initially suggested a letter to the council of my experience with accompanying photographic evidence of the ramp and I wrote one to the local paper which to my surprise, they printed.

Initially the council were a bit bolshy but once threatened with legal proceedings, they agreed to pay the garage bill.

Apparently they were unaware that the contractor they were using to build the road humps had got into financial difficulties and had to stopped mid-construction.

It would seem after a couple of other letters in the local paper regarding the same bit of road I wasn't the only one.

Do the words, incompetent and council seem a marriage made in hell ?
Re: Wingerworth - Brian
OK, Stuart, but:
The approval is meant to be for a device to deter traffic from exceeding the legal speed limit.

What is installed is a device which prevents traffic from even reaching the legal speed limit.

IMHO there is a world of difference and I repeat that if the effect is to make the road unsafe to traverse at the legal limit for certain types of vehicle then the limit should be officially lowered and signed as such.

What is happening is that the limit IS being lowered, but the proceedure being followed are the less onerous one of installing "traffic calming measures" rather than announcing a drop in the limit from 30 mph to 15 or 20 mph which would attract much more in the way of objections.
Re: Bump design - Stuart B
Brian wrote:
>
> OK, Stuart, but:
> The approval is meant to be for a device to deter traffic
> from exceeding the legal speed limit.
>
> What is installed is a device which prevents traffic from
> even reaching the legal speed limit.
>
I see your point Brian, perhaps an example of good design are the speed bumps on Brimington Common, Richard M will know where I mean. These are outside a school where there is also a temporary (non statutory) 20 mph limit at start, lunch, home time. The speed bumps are actually best taken at exactly 30mph in my car at least. Slower and the suspension does not have any give, any faster and you go into orbit, so top marks for the council there.

But despite the bumps and the 20 mph limit it did not prevent Volvo woman going through there at about 50 the other morning! If someone really does not care then nothing will stop them being lethal.
Re: Bump design / regional madness - RichardM
Hi Stuart, know exactly where you mean. (I live at Stretton BTW - I guess you know the area). Yes, you must give them a 'try'!

The real 'madness' as I see it here is that the local council took it upon themselves to erect these monsters without even attempting to reduce the limit from 40 to even 30 (20 would not bother me - it's effectively a 5mph improvement after all). These humps are outside a school, admittedly. But there is no pavement on the opposite side of the road, which could have been seen as a hazard to crossing, and even if there was, surely a pedestrian crossing of some sort would have been a better idea? There is also no amber flashing lights at busy times, like you see outside many other schools.

The problem here is that there is only really a potential, concentrated hazard on this stretch of road during school opening / closing times (let's also add a bit for dinner times). That equates to, say two hours per day. So that's ten hours per week. So what happens during the other 158 hours in the week? Thousands of law abiding motorists (and cyclists) accumulate expensive damage to their vehicles (or cycles) if they have to use the road, that's what - for I am not convinced that taking these things at even 15mph is not causing damage somewhere. (I don't drive a tank after all). Oh, and let's not forget the additional pollution they cause, and wear and tear on brakes, clutches etc. Hardly good for the environment is it? (Or ambulances). And best of all, the chances are that the potential hazard doesn't even apply when they are using the road! This is one situation where I would have been happy to see a (well signposted) Gatso - on a time operated basis of course.

I don't know...
Re: Wingerworth Speed Bumps - Stuart B
RichardM wrote:
>
> Hi Stuart, know exactly where you mean. (I live at Stretton
> BTW - I guess you know the area). Yes, you must give them a
> 'try'!
>
Hi Richard,

Had a look at these today, yes they are not really negotiable @ 40 unless you a) have zero mechanical sympathy and b) want an RV with the International Space Station. As you say 20 is OK and if I were in a rush, away from school times obviously, I would probably go over them at 30 but no more. But then the car is not mine and I think that I would definitely not take 'er indoors motor over much above 20. However they are not enough to stop the really delinquent driver who just does not care.

On the subject of how quick you go depends on whether you pay for your own motoring. You know we always used to say that, in competition, driving someone else's car was worth between one and two seconds per stage mile.

Since you live in Stretton what do you reckon about the changes in the last year to the A61 between Clay X and Higham! Surely the road did have the accident record to warrant that?

regds,
Stuart
Re: Wingerworth Speed Bumps - Stuart B
I meant to say Surely the road did NOT have .....
Re: Wingerworth Speed Bumps / A61 - RichardM
Stuart,

Crumbs, we are getting local(!) Well, by what you say I assume you travelled along the '61 just over a year ago, spring time I think it was, when the (and I do not apologise for saying this again) wonderful council imposed a 30 limit along this whole stretch, approx 3 miles. It was previously a 50 limit. The intention was (I read the planning application), to create 'traffic calming' measures on this stretch, and I feared the worst from this description. But amazingly, and after what seemed like an eternity of disruption, all that they changed was to hatch off the centre of the road using red coloured tarmac to (presumably) give the impression of a danger area to discourage overtaking. Oh, and a couple of sets of central bollards were erected as well. The irony is that whilst the 50 limit works fine on here, (it's a good road) when you get to Tupton on the way into Chesterfield, it's 60 all the way, yet that road has sharper bends, far more side roads, lots of driveways backing onto it etc. Surely concentrating on that stretch would have been a better idea for the Highways department? Oh god, hope that's not given anyone any ideas ;-)

After the work had finished, I was dreading a new lower speed limit would be in place on this previously good and 'as-safe-as-any' A road, but was surprised to find the 50 limit retained! (I'm definately NOT complaining). So I assume you have perhaps not been on this stretch recently, and assumed a major act of ' highway vandalism' had taken place from what you saw last year?

The worst thing for me though was the dreaded 30 temporary speed limit which was in place even at weekends when no one was working on the road. I had at that time recently been given an SP30, so was not keen to be clobbered again. Believe me, only *me* stuck to that limit, causing considerable risk to myself, whilst everyone else just carried on at 50 as per usual thinking I was a nutter. And the worst thing? I never saw the cops once - they could have made a fortune! Actually, are temporary speed limits enforced by the police?? Anyone know for definate?
Re: Wingerworth Speed Bumps / A61 - Tom Shaw
Temporary speed limits are DEFINATELY enforceable by the police. Are you sure you are not confusing them with "advisory" speed limits, generally black on an oblong white background?

The sign must comply with the requirements of The Road Traffic Act to be legally binding, ie inside a red bordered circle.
Re: Wingerworth Speed Bumps / A61 - Stuart B
RichardM wrote:
>
> Crumbs, we are getting local(!) Well, by what you say I
> assume you travelled along the '61 just over a year ago,

I cover this stretch both ways generally twice a week when in UK for the last oh 15 years at least, but being about to move out of the area this "pleasure" is going to be denied to me.

> spring time I think it was, when the (and I do not apologise
> for saying this again) wonderful council imposed a 30 limit
> along this whole stretch, approx 3 miles. It was previously a
> 50 limit.

I remember this road when it had NSL and there are far worse roads. Fairly open, good sight lines, premises set back, pavements each side, v little pedestrian traffic, not many junctions,what is the problem with the road? Maybe it should be what is the problem with the council? I never saw an accident on this stretch, but I notice there has been a notice with police request for witnesses due to a fatal RTA out for sometime recently. So the changes cannot have been much cop can they.

> ........disruption, all that they changed was to hatch off the centre
> of the road using red coloured tarmac to (presumably) give
> the impression of a danger area to discourage overtaking. Oh,
> and a couple of sets of central bollards were erected as
> well..........

Maybe because the overtaking opportunities are restructed then people take bigger risks when they get a chance, hence fatal commented above.

>
> The worst thing for me though was the dreaded 30 temporary
> speed limit which was in place even at weekends when no one
> was working on the road. I had at that time recently been
> given an SP30, so was not keen to be clobbered again. Believe
> me, only *me* stuck to that limit, causing considerable risk
> to myself, whilst everyone else just carried on at 50 as per
> usual thinking I was a nutter. And the worst thing? I never
> saw the cops once - they could have made a fortune! Actually,
> are temporary speed limits enforced by the police?? Anyone
> know for definate?

Wha hay! So there *was* someone else who stuck to that 30 limit, yes it was quite intimidating at the time trying to behave.
I understand as Tom says when there is the proper limit roundel that they can enforce the limit, and in some cases do, though its questionable whether you get the points. A colleague got nicked in a temporary and that is what happened to him, FPN and £60 but no points. I must say if plod really want to make a fortune they should try another temporary limit, A461 from jn with A5 @ Muckley corner towards Walsall. It is due to construction of Brum Northern relief toll road. I keep to to the signed 40 but only about 10% of the rest do, still thats a better % than the A61.

regards,
Stuart
Re: Wingerworth Speed Bumps / A61 - RichardM
Thanks Tom and Stuart,

That's cleared up a couple of nagging points for me re temp / advisory limits. Sorry to go local again to all the 'foreigners', but there is a ridiculous example of an advisory limit on the curved exit slip from the A61 in Chesterfield on the southbound dual carriageway, it goes from the 50 limit straight to an advisory 20. As it is a single carriageway you would encounter much aggression from following traffic if you were the only one to comply strictly with this speed, so at least I now know I will be able to take it at a safe 'defensive' speed next time (approx 30) without fear of prosecution!
Re: Wingerworth Speed Bumps / A61 - Tom Shaw
Advisory speed limits are often misused by highways authorities to try and avoid legal claims for damage caused by faulty repairs. For example, after resurfacing a road they will put up an advisory limit of 10mph, which they know no-one will have a hope in hell of sticking to. When they then get a claim for a shattered windscreen or damaged paint because they couldn't be bothered to roll the loose chippings properly, they will point out that this would not have happened if the victim had observed the "limit".
Re: Bump design - bogush
As far as I can recall "sleeping policemen" were ORIGINALLY designed to have a specific profile, height and spacing such that if you sped over them your car would start bouncing in sync with the suspension's natural frequency and each successive bump would amplify the bounce until you got seasick (but without any danger of damage to car or occupants).

Anyone know where there's any info on this?
Re: Wingerworth - Brian
There are two main types of design in common use in my area, speed humps (going right across the road) and speed pillows (which are only in the centre of the carriageway with space on either side).
On two wheels in good visibility the pillows can be avoided by using the spaces, but if you hit the sloping sides, particularly in icy conditions, your front wheel goes both up and to the side which is an almost certain recipe for disaster, especially if it comes down again on an icy or wet patch.
The pillows are meant to ease the passage of buses and ambulances to the nearby hospital, but I am told that the ambulance control has to re-route ambulances because the pillows are preceeded by humps on that route and they are fed up with scraping patients off the inside of the roofs.
The local authority has also had to re-route childrens "special needs" transport because the bumps either cause the kids pain or fear or else knock wheelchairs out of their fastenings in the vehicles.
Re: Wingerworth Speed Bumps - Stuart B
Richard,
Apologies to all for keeping this Derbyshire thing going, (I know I know, next thing you will be accusing us of marrying our cousins and even worse things with sheep)

But I have been taking my own advice and reading the goverment notices on speed bumps I mentioned fairly early on in this thread, and especially the Traffic Advisory leaflet 03/90 Speed Control Humps Scotland, England and Wales.

I quote
" Appropriate roads.
In England and Wales, road humps may be used along a single carriageway and dual carriageway roads providing there is a 30 mph speed limit and the road is not a trunk, special or principal road. In Scotland, road humps may be installed on all types of roads which meet the criteria...... and have a speed limit of 30mph or less. For all 3 countries unless the road is within a 20mph zone, there must be a system of lighting conforming to the requiremnts of the regulations, or the hump must be lit by lighting specially provided.

Location
Road humps must always be located along a road so that they are always preceded by a speed reducing feature.........
Speed reducing features include
another road hump within a series
certain junctions
road markings to diagram....... ie sop and give way lines
bends - as specified
the end of a cul de sac.

Well I reckon that makes these Wingerworth bumps illegal on quite a number of counts, and maybe the ones in Leeds which started this thread if they really are within 30 m of the start of the limit.
Re: Government link - bogush
stuart (bruce)

I can't ever "find" this page:

The Highways (Road Humps) Regulations 1990 ( Stat Instr No 703)
www.hmso.gov.uk/si/si1990/UKsi_19900703_en_1.htm

Any idea what the correct/new url is?
Re: Government link - Jonathan Livingston Seagull
I could not find it again either so went to Google typed in Highways (Road Humps) Regulations 1990 as the search criteria and there it is.

I mention this way of finding it as Google also produced a link to the 1996 regs which revoke the 1990 regs and appear at first glance to remove the need for the road to be a 30mph limit, thank you Steven Norris---tw*t!
Re: Speed Humps a bit later info - Stuart B
Back as you were, sorry if all this is confusing but this a real time investigation conducted in lunchtimes you know.

I think, but could yet be proved wrong, that the latest advisory leaflet is 07/97 relating to the Highways (Road Humps) regulations 1996. However there is so much stuff here it will take some tme to sort out, but one bit which leaps out and smacks you in the eye is the following.

quote
" The primary legislation is the Highways Act 1980, sections 90A to 90F, and this remains unchanged. It makes it clear that road humps can only be constructed on roads which have a speed limit of 30mph or less (sections 90A and 90B); contains requirements to advertise and consult the police (sections 90C); and contains the assurance that road humps constructed in accordance with regulations, or specially authorised, or constructed prior to adoption of the highway, are not treated as obstructions (section 90E)."

regards to all, apologies to Steven Norris for calling him a.............
Re: Speed Humps a bit later info - RichardM
Well, well, well Stuart... I would be surprised if they are totally legal - on a 40 road?!!

NEDDC would have been much wiser spending their, sorry, our money on actually *repairing* the road, you know, what our road taxes were supposed to be for... It is in a shocking state, potholes and sunken manholes everywhere. In fact , I reckon those humps are pretty much redundant as you have to take it slow or you'll practically buckle your wheels!

Keep up the research and if we know 100% then we'll have to do something!
 

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