Slow punctures and tyre pressure - SteelSpark
Not quite sure how it got there, but I managed to run over what appeared to be a ceramic teacup (I say appeared, because it shattered into about a billion pieces), as a turned into a parking space.

My initial response was relief because I was pulling into a supermarket "parent and child" space and the car noticably rode up over the cup before it popped, and I had a blood freezing moment when I wondered if I had somehow managed to not see a rogue small child!

Anyway I inspected the tyre and it seems fine, and I would expect that a ceramic cup would not really damage the tyre. However, it made me wonder, how exactly would I spot a slow puncture early? Would I just check the tyre pressure a couple of times over the next day? I read somewhere that you should check tyre pressure every couple of weeks. Do you do that by buying a pressure gauge, or can you just check it at the petrol station, at the same place you inflate your tyres?

Any advice appreciated!




Slow punctures and tyre pressure - Pat L
I think it's worth buying a pressure gauge (or a decent footptpump with built-in gauge, mainly because the ones in petrol stations are notoriously not in use or inaccurate. And many places need a 20p coin.

I had a slow (ish) puncture a few months ago on a N/S/R tyre and had to pump it up every couple of days. A real pain and a bit of a worry in terms of failure at speed.
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - Lud
a slow (ish) puncture a few months ago on a N/S/R tyre and had to pump it up every couple of days.


I've got one of those now in my new car. Loses about 2psi a day. I do front 34, rear 36 - on the high side of normal - but do that one to 38. I usually catch it again before it gets below 25 or so.

I haven't noticed any handling differences with the different levels. But then it isn't the sort of car you chuck around. The thing that bothers me is it doesn't have a proper spare, just a skinny embarrassing bicycle wheel with yellow stripes or something. Must do something about that.

Edited by Lud on 29/10/2009 at 23:30

Slow punctures and tyre pressure - SteelSpark
Thanks. I have been looking at pressure gauges and footpumps, but judging by the reviews people seem to think that the gauges on the footpumps are pretty inaccurate (and that the footpumps tend to not have a very long lifespan), so I wonder if I should just buy a (hopefully accurate) gauge and then spend the 20p at the garage when I need to top them up.

You guys mention having slow punctures and reinflating the tyres, but once you identified a slow puncture, would you not just get a new tyre pretty much straight away?

Thanks again.

Edited by SteelSpark on 30/10/2009 at 00:56

Slow punctures and tyre pressure - Rattle
I bought a car magazine which reviewed many foot pumps. One of the best for accuracy was the Michelen one, I paid around £15 for it and its been worth every penny. Accurage guage and very very easy to pump it is in a completly different league to the cheap £7 Argos specials yet hardly costs any more.

It has been one of the best things I have bought tool wise.

On a slightly different point how do the police know what the preasure should be? I do my fronts to 30 and my rears to 26 as that is what my handbook says.
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - SteelSpark
Thanks Rattle. Is it something like this?

preview.tinyurl.com/yfudbvv
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - Rattle
Thats the one :) I seem to remember from the review that Drapers did well too but were not quite as accurate as the Michelin one. What I like about it is the pump action has a very nice solid feel to it too. I used to have cheap ones and they just felt nasty and as if the preasure was never increasing.
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - Andrew-T
Gauges on footpumps are pretty inaccurate (and the footpumps tend to not have a very long lifespan) ...


I have kept a pen-type gauge in each car for decades. I can't state categorically that they are 'accurate' but they give the same readings (within 1psi) from a given tyre, and they are certainly durable - tho having said that, one did fail a few years back. The important thing is always to check your tyres with the same gauge, to eliminate variations.

I have also had a foot pump for decades. I don't rely on its gauge, partly because I can't read it while I pump. I doubt it is very accurate anyway. But maybe they don't make them like they used to - this one is metal, not plastic.

Certainly get a puncture seen to as soon as you detect it, but don't automatically 'get a new tyre'. Loose screws or nails seem to be common, but they are usually in the tread and can be repaired for £5-10.

Edited by Andrew-T on 30/10/2009 at 10:47

Slow punctures and tyre pressure - L'escargot
Temporarily swap the wheel for the spare and take the wheel to a tyre fitting place for them to horizontally immerse in water. Alternatively put the wheel vertically in your bath with enough water to reach up to the wheel and slowly rotate the wheel until you've checked the complete tyre. This ought to reveal any leak.

Edited by L'escargot on 30/10/2009 at 07:18

Slow punctures and tyre pressure - Old Navy
One of these used every week or so should do the job.

www.motorspeed.co.uk/store_main.asp?int_product_id...4
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - mjm
You need an accurate pressure gauge, checked against a known standard occaisionally. The method you then use to replace any lost air depends upon whether you want to exercise your legs, plug in an electric device or spend 20p on a forecourt using a dirty, grit contaminated device abused by everyone who uses it.
A quick check on the comparative height of the sidewalls each side will reveal a problem.
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - dieseldogg
Ere
Wots wrong with a properly calibrated toecap kick
Scheesh
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - mjm
>>Ere
Wots wrong with a properly calibrated toecap kick
Scheesh<<

Absolutely nothing. When the toecap kick tells you that the tyre needs air, you pump it up, check it with a gauge, kick it again and calibrate your toecap. Two jobs in one.
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - FotheringtonThomas
If it's a slow puncture, then it'll slowly go flat. Look at it and see whether it is, and if it is, pump it up/swap it. Doesn't everyone do this? If you want to check for a leak, then spray the tyre with hairy lipsquid and water from a squirty plant spraying thing, which you probably already have one of, or lash out 99p & get one.
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - sierraman
Quite often a slow puncture is actually a poor seal between tyre and rim.Steel wheels are particularly prone to a bit of rust buildup causing this.A refit and rim clean is the cure.
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - FotheringtonThomas
a poor seal between tyre and rim.Steel wheels are particularly prone


IME it's alloys that suffer most, possibly due to damage to their paint letting salt in.
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - SteelSpark
If it's a slow puncture then it'll slowly go flat. Look at it and see
whether it is and if it is pump it up/swap it.


Could running with the tyre possibly become dangerous before it is visibly deflated?
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - Galaxy
I bought one of these recently. It's really excellent, the Rolls Royce of Tyre Gauges!

tinyurl.com/yjvoybd

Didn't buy it from this place, though, I bought it in Halfords. Cost £25.00.

Since then I've recommended it to several friends and most of them now have one, too!
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - Old Navy
I bought one of these recently.


For that money you could have got an automatic 12 volt pump and guage delivered to your door. A guage does not help resolve the problem.

Edited by Old Navy on 30/10/2009 at 13:54

Slow punctures and tyre pressure - Galaxy
For that money you could have got an automatic 12 volt pump and guage delivered
to your door. A guage does not help resolve the problem.


Yes, I could. A cheap and nasty one. I prefer quality!
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - L'escargot
Cost £25.00.
Since then I've recommended it to several friends and most of them now have one
too!


It must be nice to be that rich.
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - Old Navy
It must be nice to be that rich.

They are just keeping up with the neighbours, (or Galaxies). :-)
Slow punctures and tyre pressure - Andrew-T
Could running with the tyre possibly become dangerous before it is visibly deflated?


Most unlikely. When tubeless tyres replaced tubed versions many years ago, one of the selling points was improved safety following a puncture. Sudden failure of a tyre (blowout) is usually the result of sidewall damage or severe overheating by fast driving when seriously underinflated. If you check tyres regularly neither of these should happen. And make sure no sharp objects are stuck in the tread.

Edited by Andrew-T on 30/10/2009 at 14:32

 

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