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Sticking stickers on windscreens - wazza
Was reading somewhere about someone who had stuck a sticker on someone's car which was parked in a disabled bay without a badge. What is the legality on sticking stickers on someone's windscreen? Normally the car will be parked on a supermarket's carpark and not on the high street where my guess is that different law may apply. Where i used to work the security guard had the right to stick notices on the windscreen if the car is not properly parked. We were powerless to do anything as we said some nice things about the security guards as we tried to remove the sticky labels from the screen.

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Sticking stickers on windscreens - Downsie

I used to be a police officer.

S.1(1) Criminal Damage Act 1971 provides that a person is guilty of criminal damage if they intentionally or recklessly destroy or damage property belonging to another without lawful excuse.

Damage is not defined by the Act. The courts have construed the term liberally. Damage is not limited to permanent damage, so smearing mud on the walls of a police cell may be criminal damage. What constitutes damage is a matter of fact and degree and it is for the court, using its common sense, to decide whether what occurred is damage.

Therefore it is arguable that attaching a large sticker with adhesive that is difficult to remove is an offence under the Act. The relevent word is 'arguable' and it is unlikely that a police force would pursue a prosecution in the event of someone placing a sticker on your car window due to the very uncertain nature of the alleged crime. A successful prosecution could be privately pursued but only with strong evidence from reliable witnesses or video evidence.

The courts would probably take a dim view of such a prosecution, viewing it as petty. Even if the prosecution was successful, you would be unlikely to be compensated for the cost of bringing the case.

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Sticking stickers on windscreens - Bilboman
Criminal Damage, if it is permanent and/or difficult to remove and/or costs money to do so. Difficult to prove, unless there are chips or scratches. A civil action (e.g. small claims) would be easier, if, of course, you can find someone to sue. Doesn't matter if it was public or private land in either case.
Polytechnic car park (in my younger days) had a humouroless sergeant-major type in charge who would pounce on unauthorised cars and slap A4 "NO UNAUTHORISED PARKING" notices onto the driver's side of the screen with evil wallpaper paste that took forever to remove. One afternoon as he was snoozing, some students slapped posters all over the door and window of his hut, trapping him inside. Unable to sue anyone for unlawful imprisonment, as he was asleep and didn't see a thing!
Sticking stickers on windscreens - Ian (Cape Town)
Mmmm. Interesting.
Given the modern-day attitude of some people, who just do as they place and sod the rest of you, often a sticker which proves difficult to remove is the only solution.
Fining won't help, as they won't pay the fine, clamping is a pain to administer, so why not adopt the attitude of 'YOU have inconvenienced somebody, let US inconvenience YOU by way of a lesson'?
Morons who park in disabled bays, morons who park obstructing other oad users, morons who park in bays clearly signposted as being 'parking for XYZ Ltd only'... yep, get out the glue!
Sticking stickers on windscreens - normd2
Somewhere at the back of my mind there's a bell ringing telling me that to put a sticker on the windscreen is illegal as it will obstruct someone's vision if not removed properly ie the person putting the sticker on leaves themselves open to charges if the car is subsequently involved in an accident. Certainly up here these stickers are only applied to side windows and the embarrasment factor and removal hassle is still the same.
Sticking stickers on windscreens - Sim-O
Why would the person putting the sticker on a windscreen be responsible/partly responsible for an accident?
It would be the drivers responsibility to ensure that the vehicle is in road worthy condition and if vision is obstructed by stickers or anything else then the driver shouldn't have driven without remove the obstruction. no different to any other part of the car.
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Aim low, expect nothing & dont be disappointed
Sticking stickers on windscreens - flunky

Quite, just as if a criminal were to smash your car to bits, doesn't mean you can pretend it's undamaged and drive it accordingly. You can of course sue the criminal, but you have your own responsibility with regard to driving the car.

Of course if the sticker were impossible to remove and stopped you legally driving, you could likely sue for any costs you had occasioned in arranging alternative transport.
Sticking stickers on windscreens - s61sw
It's not big, and it's not clever, but someone once (unjustifiably) plastered a 'don't park here' notice on my (legally and considerately parked car). Got a mouthfull of abuse from the man when I returned to my car, so I simply remembered his address and made sure he was the recipient of any 'post for information' adverts in newspapers and magazines that I came across, covering the full gammut of human interests and perversions.
S6 1SW
Sticking stickers on windscreens - 1litregolfeater

Excellent!

I'm glad to hear nobody left any paraffin nearby that could have easily been knocked over.

Sticking stickers on windscreens - Downsie

I used to be a police officer.

S.1(1) Criminal Damage Act 1971 provides that a person is guilty of criminal damage if they intentionally or recklessly destroy or damage property belonging to another without lawful excuse.

Damage is not defined by the Act. The courts have construed the term liberally. Damage is not limited to permanent damage, so smearing mud on the walls of a police cell may be criminal damage. What constitutes damage is a matter of fact and degree and it is for the court, using its common sense, to decide whether what occurred is damage.

Therefore it is arguable that attaching a large sticker with adhesive that is difficult to remove is an offence under the Act. The relevent word is 'arguable' and it is unlikely that a police force would pursue a prosecution in the event of someone placing a sticker on your car window due to the very uncertain nature of the alleged crime. A successful prosecution could be privately pursued but only with strong evidence from reliable witnesses or video evidence.

The courts would probably take a dim view of such a prosecution, viewing it as petty. Even if the prosecution was successful, you would be unlikely to be compensated for the cost of bringing the case.

 

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