Travel sickness - Sue
As a life-long sufferer here are some tips, from both ends of the sick bag...

Travel sickness tablets may work but you have to remember to take them before the journey starts.

Acupressure bands from the chemist, may also be useful in early pregnancy, child sizes available.

Stick sticking plaster behind the lower part of each ear. I think there's a pressure point here, and this really does work! Although not infallibly.

Sit the nauseous person on a newspaper - works better than you'd think and even if it doesn't at least it is easier to clear the mess up.

Tuck an old sheet over their lap - won't stop it happening but will make it easier to clear up! (This is also a good tip for up-chucking in bed, put an old sheet or large towel on the carpet in the likely direction of travel.)

Make sure there is a carrier bag handy in case they can't last until you can stop.

Train them to tell you when the feeling passes from 'feeling' to 'knowing I am going to be' sick. If you can. Obviously easier with older children.

Avoid milk/milkshakes - lemonade won't make them any less likely to be sick and will smell a whole lot better when you clear it up.

Keep the tip of your tongue in the hole of a Polo mint and see how long you can make it last.

Have 'Who can make it last longest?' competitions with Refreshers.

I can't comment on the crystallised ginger in the Vomit thread as I don't like ginger but I believe it works for some.

Finally, go NOWHERE without a change of clothes, several carrier bags, kitchen roll, wet wipes, and a bottle of drinking water. And keep them very accessible, not buried under a fortnight's worth of luggage!
Re: Travel sickness - Mark (Brazil)
> Acupressure bands from the chemist, may also be useful in early pregnancy, child sizes available.

Probably a bit of a sod to put on the child's wrist though. Imagine, I didn't even know children got travel sick before they left the womb.

You live, you learn.
Re: Travel sickness - Andrew Barnes

One of the best ways of avoiding travel sickness is to focus the eyes on something in the distance. Avoid reading, focusing on the inside of the car etc.

Andrew
Re: Travel sickness - Sue
Andrew Barnes wrote:
>
> One of the best ways of avoiding travel sickness is to focus
> the eyes on something in the distance. Avoid reading,
> focusing on the inside of the car etc.

Also true. Sufferers will be better in the front seat, but this is a problem if you have travel sick children without ever really growing out of it yourself. I'm very jealous of my husband because he can read in the car, which is why I tend to do most of the driving on long journeys. He might also be the better navigator if he would only follow our progress on the map! Probably a different topic there though ...
Re: Travel sickness - ladas are cool
never have a fiat multipla, because if the kid in the middle seat feels sick, it has to clamber over the other passengers to get out, which is going to take too long, so the kid will be sick on the person next to them.

also i remember when my sister was feeling sick, we stopped the car, opened the door, the door fell off the car, and she was sick on the door, it was terrible at the time, but is funny now.
Re: Travel sickness - Sue
ladas are cool wrote:
>
> never have a fiat multipla, because if the kid in the middle
> seat feels sick, it has to clamber over the other passengers
> to get out, which is going to take too long, so the kid will
> be sick on the person next to them.

Any child who can speak will tell you it is infinitely preferable to be sick over someone else than over yourself ...

> also i remember when my sister was feeling sick, we stopped
> the car, opened the door, the door fell off the car, and she
> was sick on the door, it was terrible at the time, but is
> funny now.

Was it a Lada, by any chance?
Re: Travel sickness - ladas are cool
no it was a ford cortina. ladas do not fall apart, a sort of 'built like a tank' feel.
Re: Travel sickness - Irene
They stop working long before they can fall apart.
Re: Travel sickness - ladas are cool
lies, all lies. ladas are good cars.
Re: Travel sickness - Rebecca
...and sit in the front, not the back.
Re: Travel sickness - Normal Bloke
It's also something that changes with age. Used to have cast iron guts, able to read maps/pace notes head down with the car performing the most ridiculous contortions. Now the ability to do this is reduced, plus I start to feel ill earlier on the fairground rides like waltzer and so on.

The best thing that's worked for the missus are acupressure bands. Does not stop the problem totally but enough to go to sleep. Then I just have the job of driving smoothly enough not to wake her.
Re: Travel sickness - Phil Goodacre
My youngest daughter endured several years of travel sickness when we used to holiday in France. She would be fine until we left the ferry, then sure as eggs is eggs, she would throw up before we got out of the terminal. It got to the stage where she was working herself into a state before we arrived at the terminal and in desperation, having tried everything else, we had her in the front seat with the road map, navigating for me. It kept her occupied for a good 180 miles to the ferry terminal and wonders be, no further problems. It was just a case of keeping her mind off the problem.
Re: Travel sickness - Sue
Phil Goodacre wrote:
> It was just a
> case of keeping her mind off the problem.

Yes, my youngest still has a 'thing' about throwing up and the anticipation is far worse than the event. He starves himself on car journeys (apart from sweets!) in case this precipitates it, and tries not to fall asleep, as he once woke up near the end of a journey only to decorate the surroundings. Duly grateful for tolerant friends and removable seats!

I can thoroughly recommend The Hitch-Hikers' Guide to the Universe for taking minds, young and old, off nausea, and even after multiple playings it has not palled for any of us!
the good rules of beating travel sickness. - ladas are cool
the best thing is to have a good meal the night before travelling, also i found that if you walk along the sea front the day of travelling you are OK. plus get a good night sleep beforehand, and dont eat any sweets on the journey, and yes ginger does work, so eat ginger snap biscuits.
Re: the good rules of beating travel sickness. - Cliff Pope
Fresh air, I mean real fresh air that used to come in through open windows before people forgot how to open them.
Watch the countryside not a book.
Try one of those psychological tricks like a dangling chain, and make it the sufferer's job to check that it is still there.
 

Value my car