puncture embarassment - looking4car
I'm no mechanic, and no DIY expert but I thought I could change a wheel without too many problems.

I had a puncture today.

Got the car jacked up using the lightweight tools provided and got the wheelnuts off ok.

Could I hell as like get the wheel off. I was on a bit of an incline and the tiny jack was not giving much confidence when I was shaking and banging the wheel.

Ended up calling out the RAC. With a heavyweight trolley jack and a big mallet it came off but not immediately.

I don't know if he was just being kind but he said this often happened with alloys sticking.

Moral of the story is to check the wheels come off ok with the tools provided. Or should I just call the RAC ? ;-)
puncture embarassment - Wilco {P}
They do stick - luckily for me it wasn't a puncture though. Given modern service intervals and schedules I'm sure your wheels will sometime not come off the car for months or even years depending on your mileage and tyre wear.

So they need a big clout to shift them. And if you carry a mallet big enough to do the job you'll probably be looked on with some suspicion when you get tugged for that "routine inspection" late at night...
puncture embarassment - borasport20
I have a torque spanner about 2ft long in the back of the car, which ensures
(a) - It has enough leverage to crack the nuts without having to jump up and down on those little 'L' shaped things you get these days
(b) - you can torque the nuts up correctly when you put them back - stops the difficulty getting them off and prevents the weakening of alloys you can get from overtightening
(c) - I always know where the torque spanner is, as opposed to any other tool which may be occupying a random space somewhere in the garage.

Also, within a few weeks of buying a car, I always have all the wheels off and apply a smidgeon of copaslip


Bora - what Bora ?
puncture embarassment - looking4car
Yes Bora,the RAC man recommended copaslip.

Nice bloke and efficient service BTW, first time I've called them.
puncture embarassment - malteser
No need for the RAC OR Arnie muscles.
When you purchase your nice new car remove all the wheels and put copper-eze on all the wheel studs - replace wheels and no problems at puncture time!
When I owned a garage we ALWAYS put copper eze on every wheel we removed - small cost - big benefit later!
Why work when you can sleep?
puncture embarassment - hillman
>>...copper eze on all the wheel studs ...

I can imagine copper eze between the alloy rim and the axle, but shouldn't the wheel nuts be put on dry ?
puncture embarassment - Kuang
Doesn't studs refers to locator studs on the hub rather than the wheelbolts? I wouldn't imagine sticking goop on the threads would do any good whatsoever! :)
puncture embarassment - Kevin
In support of Hillman's post, I found the following warning in the Driver Handbook for one of my cars.

CAUTION
Never use oil or grease on studs or nuts. If you do the nuts might come loose. Your wheel could fall off, causing a serious accident.

Their advice is to clean the threads and hub surfaces with a wire brush to remove any corrosion, then replace them dry.

I always check wheelnuts with my own torque wrench whenever they've been removed. It's a five minute job and I know that they are tightened correctly. Much cheaper than having to replace warped disks or buy new nuts.

Kevin...
puncture embarassment - Bromptonaut
Could I hell as like get the wheel off. I was
on a bit of an incline and the tiny jack was
not giving much confidence when I was shaking and banging the
wheel.


I ma neithera mechanic nor a muscleman. Bought a decent socket set and a long extension bar after a couple of similar experiences in my Pug104 20 yrs ago. Advice at the time was to loosen the nuts before jacking, still do this and frequently need to apply my entire eight and a half stone to jumping on the extension bar.
puncture embarassment - Bromptonaut
I ma neithera mechanic nor a muscleman.


Or a typist!!
puncture embarassment - No Do$h
You should always loosen the wheelnuts whilst the car is on the ground anyway, otherwise your frantic tugging may rock the car off the jack.

One quick way of loosening the wheel on the hub is to loosen the nuts (quarter turn, no more), jack the car, lower car again, jack again. Often the act of loading and unloading the hub will "break to the seal", so to speak.
puncture embarassment - Ian (Cape Town)
Given the average moron employed by tyre-fitters worldwide, it is best to ensure that they don't overtighten the studs when they do any work on the wheels - especially with those compressed-air driven spanners, which always seem to be set to 100 % power! Best to do all the studs yourself, with a torque wrench. If the guys object, tell them you'll take your business elsewhere!
puncture embarassment - Wilco {P}
Think the thread was originally about getting the wheel off the hub rather than impossible to undo wheelnuts (which they always are after any garage treatment).

Good advice re copper-eze - having experienced the problem first-hand, I'll do this to my mine.
puncture embarassment - king arthur
Just make sure you don't get any on the brake discs!
puncture embarassment - henry k
Given the average moron employed by tyre-fitters worldwide, it is best
to ensure that they don't overtighten the studs when they do
any work on the wheels - especially with those compressed-air driven
spanners, which always seem to be set to 100 % power!
Best to do all the studs yourself, with a torque
wrench.


Just back again from your town. It was brilliant as ever.
Some friendly *** let one of the tyres down on a rental Scenic hired from a well known Co. I found it a real problem getting the wheel nuts off the alloys. Fortunately I got help as I was still in town. WD40 and a three foot long tube were required to move them. It would have been a real worry if it had occurred outside of town as there is a limit to how far a flat can be driven on.
It is not very practical to check wheel removal before setting off from the airport or I could take my own extension with me.

I too had problems at home with removing the alloys of a 3 year old Focus 2 litre. Nuts came off OK but wheels needed a hammering. I suspect the Ford FSH from the previous company owner did not extend to removing wheels as pad inspection does not need it.
I would agree with the advice. Take off all the wheels at the first opportunity and then relax a little.
 

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