perpetual motion car. - chris watson
i am working on a car that is driven by perpetual motion, the only problem is that the does a top speed of 37 mph, i cant get the car to go any slower (37 - mph in a 30 zone means alot of speed tickets), i also cant get it to brake (the engine is always doing 37mph), the good thing is that it costs nothing to run the car. the other thing is a car run by air power. what do people think???
Re: perpetual motion car. - Stuart B
Paint it pink and it will be a winner, ;-D
Re: perpetual motion car. - chris watson
this is serious. i am trying to make a perpetual motion car, it works in my volvo 340, if you have any ideas then please reply. it works on magnetic forces.
Re: perpetual motion car. - Vin
Chris,

Bet you all the money I ever make in my life that you can't make a perpetual motion *anything* by the end of 2002.

Your stake? One hundred quid. Great odds for you.

I am serious.

Vin
Re: perpetual motion car. - Ian Aspinall
A new political party, a pink Chieftain tank, and now a perpetual motion Volvo...Chris, you're an absolute star. Don't ever give up posting to this forum, will you?!?
Re: perpetual motion car. - David Woollard
Ian A,

Just two words too many in your post.....edit out "Don't ever" and it's nearer the mark.

(I didn't start it Martyn!)

David
Re: perpetual motion car. - Darcy Kitchin
David

Hardly moderate sentiments, eh?
Re: perpetual motion car. - Ian Cook
Is this a variant of the Rolls Canardly?
Re: perpetual motion car. - John Slaughter
Ian

More likely related to the Austin Tatious!

Cheers

john
Re: perpetual motion car. - John Slaughter
Chris

One of my jobs in the Power Industry got me answering the regular letters from people who had invented new ways of generating power from perpetual motion machines.

Sorry, but it cannot work. Perpetual motion simply doesn't obey the laws of physics. Send me the details and I'll tell you what's wrong with the idea - guaranteed. I'll even waive my usual consultancy fees, but I'm betting it won't cost me much!

Regards

john
Re: perpetual motion car. - chris watson
the idea is something that looks alot like a gyroscope which has magnets on the outer wheel, then you have a casing around the gyroscope which has magnets around the inside, so the effect is the magnets push away from each other, that then turns the gyroscope, so the gyroscope then turns forever, and on the bottom of the gyroscope is a set of pulleys which are belt driven, that in turn moves the wheels, so you can manage 37 mph. this is NOT a joke i have managed 37 mph from a 1985 volvo 340 DL that originally had a 1400 engine. what ever people say this car is real. i hope to surprise you all when the final modifications are done, then the car will be driven around the country, for all to see.
Re: perpetual motion car. - John Slaughter
Not a lot of detail, but I think I see the snag. Apparently stationary magnets constantly repel each other then. No, you have to constantly realign the magnets, and that's the energy input, so perpetual motion it isn't.

I can only assume that the 37 mph wasn't with this device driving the car.

regards

john
Re: perpetual motion car. - Darcy Kitchin
Chris,

There is a measure of healthy scepticism on the forum generated by your assertions. I too believe that not only can you never make a perpetual motion machine, but that a Volvo 340 is emphatically the wrong platform to test it, especially the perpetual bit.

I am writing this from my office in Spennymoor and I will pay your speeding fine if you can get the car over here for me to look at.

Some contributors have suggested that your car may be pink, please advise what colour Volvo 340 to look out for, and I will send you the office address.

PS if it's worked by magnetic power, is it safe to wear a clockwork watch in the vicinity?
Re: perpetual motion car. - Chris (not Watson)
Maybe some of the energy that keeps pushing the thing up to 37 mph could be channelled into the heated seats. That way if your backside was nice and warm you could relax in the knowledge that you could never break the thirty limit.

Chris

P.S. It would be safe to wear a watch, but time would seem to stand still. But then that's normal for a 340 anyway...
Re: perpetual motion car. - Dave
chris watson wrote:
>
> i am working on a car that is driven by perpetual motion, the
> only problem is that the does a top speed of 37 mph, i cant
> get the car to go any slower (37 - mph in a 30 zone means
> alot of speed tickets), i also cant get it to brake (the
> engine is always doing 37mph), the good thing is that it
> costs nothing to run the car. the other thing is a car run by
> air power. what do people think???

Moderator! Where are you!

I don't care what he does elsewhere but on *this* forum he should OBEY the law of thermodynamics!!!

Isn't it 3 points and 60 quid fixed penalty for breaking the law of thermodynamics?
Re: perpetual motion car. - Chris
Dave wrote:
>
> Isn't it 3 points and 60 quid fixed penalty for breaking the
> law of thermodynamics?

Oh, come on, everybody does it these days, especially when the traffic is light. Cars these days are much more capable than they used to be, and can handle flogiston streams, time travel and spontaneous combustion with ease. IMHO the laws of thermodynamics should be abolished to avoid criminalising the ordinary inventor.

Chris
Re: perpetual motion car. - Dave
Chris wrote:
>
> Dave wrote:
> >
> > Isn't it 3 points and 60 quid fixed penalty for breaking the
> > law of thermodynamics?
>
> Oh, come on, everybody does it these days, especially when
> the traffic is light. Cars these days are much more capable
> than they used to be, and can handle flogiston streams, time
> travel and spontaneous combustion with ease. IMHO the laws of
> thermodynamics should be abolished to avoid criminalising the
> ordinary inventor.

I agree! I mean I was prepared to tolerate the crack down contravening on Newton's First Law because that's dangerous and irresponsible. Only yesterday I saw a body fail to remain at rest or in uniform motion in a straight line unless compelled to change its state by the action of an external force. Disgraceful.

But this is to far! What next Pythagoros? It's a free country and I'll use any collective value of internal angles I choose in my triangles!
Thermodynamics - Vin
For heaven's sake stop this thread now as all the pointless energy being redistributed is contributing to the heat death of the universe.
My last thoughts. - David Woollard
Sorry Vin, my last word (who does that remind you of?) on the subject.

Perhaps we are doing cw a disservice here. I just remembered that perpetual motion did exist about 30 years ago and may well still do so.

There was a road in Scotland years ago where cars would go uphill with the engine off. There was no trick with the car, it was true. I think that was connected with magnetism and it is due to a shift in the tilt of the earth over time that this doesn't happen now. Something about the moon interfering with the pull.

I understand movement of the planets did affect the amount of pull on the car, a serious effect was given by uranus, and so we come full circle (perpetual motion you see) to where cw is talking from.

David
Re: My last thoughts. - Darcy Kitchin
David

Bet you wish there was such a road in the fens?

Me, I'm enjoying this thread tremendously and waiting for a pithy comment from David Lacey.
Re: My last thoughts. - Dave
Darcy Kitchin wrote:

> waiting for a
> pithy comment from David Lacey.

Dave Lacey's prolly already made a perpetual motion car as a parts bin special. He prolly used a Rover 213 shell...
Re: My last thoughts. - John Slaughter
No David, this one was done by mirrors - it was an optical illusion. Either that or it was the road the three Yorkshiremen used to mention when discussing how hard they had it in their youth. In their day they used to walk miles to work, uphill both ways!

Cheers

John
Re: My last thoughts. - Andrew Smith
there are a few of these road around the country. They require a horizon which tricks the eye into believing a road is uphill when in fact it is down.
Re: perpetual motion car. - Ian Cook
Well, at least Chris has now revealed the principle of his perpetual motion machine.

Me? I don't believe it, and I will continue working on my patent for self cooking fish and chips! I had to stop my brother working on a self igniting Lada, because I think it's been done before.
Re: perpetual motion car. - Darcy Kitchin
Had a self-igniting Fiat 128 once. This I think was the origin of the phrase "smoked windows"
Fiat 128. - David Woollard
Now there was a car Darcy. My uncle had one and I remember they were one of the first indications that lightweight, free revving, FWD (I think) cars had a real future.

The 1290cc version was quicker than such cars as the Rover 2000 with a fuel consumption about 10mpg better.

OK so they were a Fiat and rusted but while newish showed the way things would go ten years later.

David
Re: Fiat 128. - John Slaughter
Brilliant fun, but rust - never seen anything like them. Front suspension just fell off my cousin's example. As my car restoration instructor said, only one word applies to repairing rusty Fiats - DON'T.

Cheers

John
Re: Fiat 128. - Darcy Kitchin
Agreed, great fun. I had the Rallye version with driving lights, "sports" seats and extra gauges. It also had a pair of big electric horns mounted behind a cutout in the grille, and above the distributor. When it rained, water would collect on the horns and drip onto the dib. The engine would miss and then stop. Cured it with a plastic sheet and a bungee. Always wondered if Turin has a particularly dry climate - never been.
Re: perpetual motion car. - mike harvey
I seem to remeber that there is a machine very close to perpetual motion, which consists of a pair of white and a black sided discs set opposite and in reverse to each other, which spin on an axis inside a vacuum when sunlight is shone onto it. I think the black side absorbs the rays and energy, whilst the white side reflects it, so the thing turns. This of course does not drive anything, and the power input is greater than the frictional losses, so it looks like perpetual motion. Wouldn't overcome the frictional losses of a 340 though, or the wind, which increases as the square of the speed.
I agree with the rest of you. No.
Mike
Re: perpetual motion car. - Dave
mike harvey wrote:
>
> when sunlight is shone onto it.

Boyle is laughing at you mate - you've invented solar power! ;-)
Re: perpetual motion car. - mike harvey
No, twas not me! I'm no particle physisist, but I think light has some sort of mass, hence E=MC 2 (squared, can't do the 2 bit!)
Mike
Re: perpetual motion car. - John Slaughter
Yes, but as there is an energy input, it isn't perpetual motion - what happens in a darkened room?

Regards

john
Radiometers - Vin
Mike,

'tis a radiometer you have described - I've got one on my windowsill at home, and very diverting it is, too. You can get one at www.hawkin.com . It's the best sub-tenner present you can buy. It is, however, solar powered, so is not in any way related to perpetal motion.

And as for David Woollard's Moon-powered Lada, if it's making the Lada accelerate it's affecting the Moon's momentum by the same amount. And according to chaos theory, this could be just the kick the solar system needs to kick it into the path of a black hole, leading to innumerable deaths. Don't mess with the universe. It could, however result in us NOT going into a black hole we were otherwise destined for, so it may be better to keep up the good work, Chris, and hope for the best.

Vin
Pulling and the moon. - David Woollard
Hardly fair when Guy Lacey is on his hols but I bet the moon affects the way he pulls. Top rate during a full moon?? Natural magnetism or the attraction of that glinting GTI Golf?

David
Re: perpetual motion car. - Tom Shaw
What drugs are you all on, and where can I get some?
Would a perpetual motion bike be faster than a per - Dave
Of course the bike would be quicker!!!
Re: perpetual motion car. - Dwight Van-Driver
One thing for sure it aint a Volvo, its a Vauxhall.

When it gets there the driver " valks all" the way back.
Re: perpetual motion car. - Dave M
Dave Lacey's prolly already made a perpetual motion car as a parts bin special. He prolly used a Rover 213 shell...

As one of Daves friends i think its important to point out in fact his audi could well be powered by perpetual motion therefore explaining his inability to switch off his engine when he visits me
(sorry dave couldnt resist it)
Re: perpetual motion car. - Mark (Brazil)

Perpetual motion requires that friction, including air resistance, does not exist.
Speed of car is related to gearing, not engine.
Engine does x rpm not y mph.
Braking resistance is related to clutch/gearbox, not engine
Magnets deteriorate and therefore the motion would not be perpetual
Resistance/reaction between two forces will eventually balance, inevitably.

- At least make the wind-ups a little more intelligent.
Re: perpetual motion car - Alvin Booth
Chris,
Would you allow me to invest in your brilliant idea.
Ignore the sceptics. They said many great inventors were mad.
Please let me come to your asylum to discuss financing and any help you may need.
best regards,
Alvin
WIND POWERED CAR. - chris watson
i also have an idea for a wind powered car, as the car drives, the wind goes through the grill, which is then converted into power via wind turbines which charge batteries, so the car moves on battery power, also the faster you go the more wind goes through the grill, so the car gets a better charge.
Re: WIND POWERED CAR. - Alvin Booth
Chris,
Your'e a little genius.
I'm lost for superlatives.
We are all so proud of you. Get it patented before some of the pirates on this site run away with your ideas.
Finance....no probs, just ask us.

Alvin
Re: WIND POWERED CAR. - Mark
Alvin

I've a good idea where the wind could come from, an inexhaustable supply methinks.

as ever

Mark
Re: WIND POWERED CAR. - John Slaughter
Chris

Bloody hell - not that old chestnut!

Last serious reply from me -

IT WON'T WORK. The wind turbine will create extra drag as the air goes through it (you have to put energy into the turbine to get electricity out). The electricity out will be less than the extra drag, so the whole thing grinds to a halt. If it was that simple, it would have been done years ago.

Over and Out

John
Re: WIND POWERED CAR. - richard turpin
No. Youre all wrong. There is perpertual motion. The earth moves round, but the universe stays still. All you need is some planks between your garage and the universe. And that's it. No warming up necessary either.
Solar power. - David Woollard
No problem, I know where to find a plank!

David
Re: Solar power. - richard turpin
You are are all so rude! What's wrong with baked beans anyway. I like them. As for planks, David, I'm informed that we are all 99% made of water anyway. Just how do you fit in with this scenario? Water or wood?
Water or Wood. - David Woollard
Richard,

Trying , and I guess failing, to steer my moderate course between the two.

David
Re: Water or Wood. - Vin
David,

Remember this?

"my last word (who does that remind you of?) on the subject."

Vin
Last word. - David Woollard
The problem was mirrored when our small girls had pals round yesterday for a ride on their Shetland Pony, they all wanted to have the last ride.

Bit of a close thing, last word/last ride, in determined attitude between the kids and posts here (self included).

David
Re: Water or Wood. - Ian Cook
How can the earth move round, Richard - it's flat!
Re: WIND POWERED CAR. - Brian
It's not exactly perpetual motion, but I am waiting for someone to develop a car powered by photo-electric cells backed up by a compressed air motor with air tanks which can be recharged at home.
Then Gordon Brown can stick his fuel tax where the monkey put his nuts!
Re: WIND POWERED CAR. - Bill Doodson
If it will do 37 mph and its a Volvo 340 drive it to the nearest scrapper and put it and us out of our misery.

Bill
 

Value my car