Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - Bill C

HI all,, I have my breakdown cover through my car insurance and thankfully have never had to use it until this week when I drove into a deep pothole. The tire must have deflated because the sound of the bang was typically wheel rim to ground. I thought i'd change the wheel to my temp,spare but the alloy would not come off the hub, As usual in Glasgow East its always blowing a gale with torrential rain and I was soaked through and freezing cold so I rang the breakdown number and explained the situation only to be told that because I'd mentioned the word "Pothole" I wasn't covered and was put through to the claims department who after 15 mins wait said that because there could be body damage my only way was for them to call a recovery team but that I would have to pay for it all. by now I wasn't in the best mood so I told them where they could shove their policy !!. My local garage have since told me that the alloy had almost welded itself to the hub. On reflection I think I should have gone for a full claim but when your cold and wet you don't think clearly, So Beware and never mention to an insurer about potholes even though roads seem to compose of holes with tar around them. all the best Bill Clark (Glasgow)

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - daveyK_UK
Good advice, thank you
Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - Andrew-T

It's not much to do with insurance, but your problem illustrates the value of checking a car's wheels every year or two to make sure you are able to change a wheel at the roadside. Alloys, bolts and hubs tend to seize gradually if undisturbed. You don't say how old the car is, or when a wheel-bolt was last loosened. Even straight from a tyre fitter's, fixings can be too tight for loosening with the tools provided with the car.

You don't need to lift the car to check - when you have a few minutes to spare, just loosen and retighten each bolt (fully) so you are ready for an emergency.

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - bathtub tom

just loosen and retighten each bolt (fully) so you are ready for an emergency.

That won't help much if the wheel's stuck to the hub.

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - sammy1

That won't help much if the wheel's stuck to the hub

Happens a lot, Tyre fitters have a big rubber mallet for such occasions

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - Steveieb

Which breakdown company did you call out ?

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - maxime

I thought the advice was to undo the bolts a good bit and push pull on the wheel while still on the ground. He who must be sometimes obeyed told me that. then when it is freed, jack it up properly..

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - Alby Back
@Maxime, I got married in Scotland and all I promised to do before God and an audience was to cherish, but my wife undertook to obey. I remind her of this periodically. However, I'd have to say, she fairly frequently strays beyond the boundaries of her contractual obligations.

;-)
Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - maxime
@Maxime, I got married in Scotland and all I promised to do before God and an audience was to cherish, but my wife undertook to obey. I remind her of this periodically. However, I'd have to say, she fairly frequently strays beyond the boundaries of her contractual obligations. ;-)

That was scottish advice. Huuby from west calder.

Do you approve of his method though.

Sometimes I obey, after a nice noggin.

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - Falkirk Bairn

Wheel stuck to hub?

Loosen wheel nuts slightly.

Jack up car

Loosen the nuts a bit further

Lower the jack.

The weight of the car will free the wheel from the hub

Jack up & take the wheel off.

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - bathtub tom

Didn't work in my case, even took it round the block with the wheel nuts loose. Finally came free with a long piece of 4"x2" and a sledgehammer.

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - Sparrow

Each year when I swap my normal wheels to smaller ones fitted with winter tyres I have to use a rubber mallet to get them off. Rears are the worst for some reason. The fronts need just a couple of hits. To do the rears typically needs to rotate wheel and hit all the way round as it slowly comes off. I've not tried Maxine's suggested method, but have the mallet method down to a fine art now, after 3 winters of swapping wheels. Well worth it by the way, liads more grip.

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - madf

My wheels never stick. Coppaslip the mating surfaces.

Works a treat.

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - bathtub tom

My wheels never stick. Coppaslip the mating surfaces.

Be careful, around half the torque is transferred by friction between the wheel and hub.

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - Andrew-T

<< around half the torque is transferred by friction between the wheel and hub. >>

Presumably 100%, once the two become inextricably attached ?

I'm sure the 4 (or more) bolts, properly tightened, contribute something, and if any movement occurs, also 100% when further movement is prevented ?

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - edlithgow

My wheels never stick. Coppaslip the mating surfaces.

Be careful, around half the torque is transferred by friction between the wheel and hub.

I've used polythene sheet, aluminium foil, and (most simply) cheapo Taiwanese chassis grease. which I also use on the studs (in combination with polythene) and which is all I use now.

Coppaslip seems unnecesarily expensive, and you can't get it here anyway

Wheels havn't fallen off yet.

I'm not sure what ""torque transfer" means here, but if I wanted to improve the shear resistance I might use fine sand.

I dont, so I havn't

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - Bill C

Hi all, Thank for all your kind replies. Just to let you know that my cars back on the potholed road again but it's cost me £400.00 for a new alloy rim, a rear suspension spring (smashed in two) and a new tyre. The council will be hearing from me! First time I've posted on a forum, I didn't expect anybody to reply. Cheers People- Bill(Glasgow)

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - bathtub tom

Good luck with the council, unless you can show it had been reported previously - you did report it to them, didn't you, to prevent anyone else incurring damage?

Try www.fixmystreet.com

There are similar other websites.

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - skidpan

My wheels never stick. Coppaslip the mating surfaces.

Be careful, around half the torque is transferred by friction between the wheel and hub.

Been using coppaslip since about 1980 when the wheels stuck unto the hubs on a Mk 2 Escort I owned. In those 40+ years never had a single issue with wheels coming loose and since about 2000 its been common to find garages using coppaslip during services. Guess they hate hammering wheels off as much as we do.

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - Steveieb

Would be interested to learn which breakdown recovery company refused to help. I’m about to renew mine and Start rescue have much better reviews in Which than Auto-assist who I am currently with.

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - _ORB_

Would be interested to learn which breakdown recovery company refused to help. I’m about to renew mine and Start rescue have much better reviews in Which than Auto-assist who I am currently with.

When I had to use Start rescue when the Venga broke down, (fuel system failure) they were quick, took the car to the Kia dealer nearby and dropped me off at home.

Score 100%.

No hesitation in recommending start.

when you buy, type in Discount codes into google and check with moneysavingexpert. last time i renewed I got 15% off with a discount code.

Now have 2 years free with kia..

ORB

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - Xileno

Been using coppaslip since about 1980...

I seem to recall a thread on this forum from many years ago regarding this subject, whether to coppaslip or not. I think it might have been one of Aprilia's but the search facility on this forum is sometimes not too helpful. I seem to remember the subject caused some strong views on both sides and I doubt there's a proven definitive answer.

The logic is (from what I remember) that you want the torque transferred from the hub to the road via the hub/wheel facing surface, rather than via the bolts. If there's not enough friction between the mating surfaces, then the bolts are taking the strain more.

I do a compromise and when the wheels are off I thoroughly clean both the hub and wheel surfaces and use just a very small bit of coppaslip. However, as I do a lot of my own maintenance, the wheels come of every year, pads removed, calipers cleaned and regreased, but I know this probably doesn't happen in many garages. If the wheels were removed regularly then Coppaslip would not be needed.

Edited by Xileno on 28/02/2021 at 10:46

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - madf

The Jazz wheels have a lip which fits round the hub when bolted up.

Any slight movement of the wheel on the hub is stopped by the lip. So any slippage is minimal and te ehub takes the strain -not the wheel bolts.

Of course, if I was driving a 500bhp monster and doing racing starts...

I have always used coppalsip/grease for over 50 years of driving and seen no evidence of damage to wheel threads.

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - edlithgow

The Jazz wheels have a lip which fits round the hub when bolted up.

Any slight movement of the wheel on the hub is stopped by the lip. So any slippage is minimal and te ehub takes the strain -not the wheel bolts.

Of course, if I was driving a 500bhp monster and doing racing starts...

I have always used coppalsip/grease for over 50 years of driving and seen no evidence of damage to wheel threads.

Having thought about it a bit more, I'd assume the mention of "torque" above implies its the rotational load that is being considered. The lip will probably take lateral loads such as the weight of the vehicle and bump shocks.

The concern would thus be failure of the wheel studs in shear if they have to take all the acceleration or deceleration (such as emergency braking) forces as the wheel tries to rotate relative to the (lubricated) hub surface.

This, AFAIK, doesn't in fact happen, ever, even to me (touch wood).

Re what to use, as well as being relatively expensive where available, and unobtainable here in Taiwan, I don't like Coppaslip on (largely theoretical) electrochemical grounds. This probably wouldn't really be an issue with my steel wheels but might be with the alloys most people have.

I have a small tube of Aluslip, bought in Japan. I use it sparingly on things like exhaust manifold studs,

If cheapo chassis grease didn't do the job on hubs I might supplement it by rubbing with aluminium foil, but I've already painted the hubs with aluminium and sunflower oil (which set long ago so it doesn't stick my wheels on) so this would usually be overkill.

Edited by edlithgow on 02/03/2021 at 00:16

Honda Jazz - Beware! breakdown cover - skidpan

If the wheels were removed regularly then Coppaslip would not be needed.

Winter, salt, warm spells, rain, snow etc and it does not take long for alloys to stick to a steel hub.

 

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