Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - Anna Lee

Changing a flat tire sounds simple: jack up the car, replace the tire with a spare tire, and then you can get back on the road again.

But the importance of doing things properly for safety cannot be stressed enough, particularly when it involves a machine that weighs at least a ton (or thereabouts). Otherwise, the least of your concerns would be a simple flat tire.

Do:

  • Have the necessary tools
  • Mind the jacking points
  • Engage the parking brake
  • Wear protective gloves

Don't:

  • Ignore the right jack
  • Loosen the lug nuts after lifting the car
  • Forget to bring out the spare first
  • Let the nuts dry up

Do you have more idea? Don't hesitate to share with me :D

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - Andrew-T

Wonder who is backing this idiot's guide ?

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - John F

Clearly from America.......'tire' 'lug nuts'. Not necessarily idiotic, they're just different. One could add - do it in a safe place, even if it means wrecking the tire (sic). Not a problem in the US as virtually always plenty of safe space to pull over to. Not so on on so many of our cramped roads. Could also add torque to the correct tightness when you get home.

Edited by John F on 22/12/2020 at 10:33

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - edlithgow

One could add - do it in a safe place, even if it means wrecking the tire (sic). Not a problem in the US as virtually always plenty of safe space to pull over to. Could also add torque to the correct tightness when you get home.

Are you assuming tactical air support, maybe from a drone operated by the local èquivalent of the AA (AAA)?

Seem more likely than them having a torque wrench, and probably more useful.

I can remember a few "What's in your emergency tool kit?" threads on the US site I used to post on before I was banned, in which sidearms seriously outweighed spanners. Quite a few long weapons (mostly AR-15) too.

Another guy regarded carrying an electric impact driver as essential.

"How else are you going to get the lug nuts off?"

Seriously. I am not making it up.

Thinking about it a bit more though, if you think you might have to remove the "lug nuts" under fire, time might be of the essence.

Edited by edlithgow on 23/12/2020 at 03:23

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - FP

Bizarre stuff.

"Don't ignore the right jack".

"Don't let the lug nuts dry up."

Lug nuts?

Tires?

And I've never heard of people replacing the "tire" themselves - that's pretty difficult. Most people replace the wheel and tyre.

One idea I will share with you, Anna - stop your d***** and go away.

(The filter doesn't like "d r i v e l", apparently.)

Edited by FP on 22/12/2020 at 10:32

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - sammy1

Sounds pretty logical to me. Not much Christmas cheer to the OP here!

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - Andrew-T

And I've never heard of people replacing the "tire" themselves - that's pretty difficult. Most people replace the wheel and tyre.

Something I remember from a garage in America in the mid-60s is the sight of a tire being released from the bead by a large black man jumping on it in big boots. I'm sure the machines we are now so familiar with must have existed, but apparently not at this place.

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - Engineer Andy

I suspect this is a segway (nice bit of Americanism to compliment the use of 'tire') to posting some spam as an edit on another 'comment', given recent form by the spammer brigade.

I suspect this 'advice' is lifted straight off another website, ahem, I mean websight ("Do you have more idea" - yeah - great Ingleesh there old bean).

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - FP

Don't you mean "prequel" or "prelude"?

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - Andrew-T

Don't you mean "prequel" or "prelude"?

No, I think he means a segue, but I also thought it might be an appropriate pun for a motoring column ....

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - FP

A segue is a section of music that follows another without a break; it's not the piece that precedes, but the one that follows, so the post cannot be the "segway... to posting some spam".

Edited by FP on 22/12/2020 at 23:51

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - edlithgow

I thought it was the transition between the two, though that's just from context. I've never looked it up.

Edited by edlithgow on 23/12/2020 at 03:16

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - Carrot

Wiping my ass: what to do & NOT to do?

Do you have more idea? Don't hesitate to share with me :D

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - Smileyman

do hope the spare isn't flat!

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - bathtub tom

do hope the spare isn't flat!

Yes! Colleague had a puncture and because the spare was flat had to have two relays to get them home. Why the AA couldn't pump up a tyre I don't know.

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - Senexdriver

On a serious note, I’m always a bit nervous as to where exactly the jacking point is. Not always clear - certainly a point of some debate on my A3! Manufacturer-supplied jacks never look substantial enough to me. In recent years I’ve only had to change a wheel once and I was lucky enough to be able to do it on my driveway with my own trolley jack. If I get a flat while out, I’ll call out my breakdown recovery company. Changing a wheel is part of the cover.

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - Andrew-T

I’m always a bit nervous as to where exactly the jacking point is. f I get a flat while out, I’ll call out my breakdown recovery company.

All my cars that I can recall have had obvious jacking points and jacks capable of supporting the car for long periods. I have come across (old) Minis which had clearly been jacked under the front footwell, with predictable results. And back in the day plenty of cars' jack-points failed due to corrosion.

The most likely problem with changing a wheel at the roadside will be finding a hard level surface to jack against.

Edited by Andrew-T on 10/01/2021 at 23:00

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - edlithgow

The most likely problem with changing a wheel at the roadside will be finding a hard level surface to jack against.

I'd say the most likely problems, in rough order of probability, would be:-

1. Flat spare (no spare is likely too, but excluded by "changing a wheel")

2. "Professionally" applied wheel nuts, which will have been massively over-torqued and un-lubricated, so won't be removable with the standard tools.

3. .finding a hard level surface to jack against.

I wonder if there are actually any figures on this? A quick Google didn't find any.

Edited by edlithgow on 11/01/2021 at 09:57

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - Andrew-T

<< 1. Flat spare (no spare is likely too, but excluded by "changing a wheel")

2. "Professionally" applied wheel nuts, which will have been massively over-torqued and un-lubricated, so won't be removable with the standard tools.

3. .finding a hard level surface to jack against. >>

Well, yes, Ed, but you are widening the discussion which is really about jacking points. Your items 1 and 2 require recognition and preparation by the user, while my point (3) is likely to arise accidentally, wherever the urgency of wheel-changing occurs.

Changing a flat tire: What to do & NOT to do? - edlithgow

I've often seen the recommendation to carry a bit of board (plywood would be a better bet) as a jack foot, so the .finding a hard level surface to jack against is subject to recognition and preparation by the user too, though come to think on't I dont have one. Should fix that, really

I'm not sure the discussion was about jacking points, but if it was, I'd add in passing that I never use them, because (a) I don't trust them (with good reason on some of my past cars) (b) I dont usually have the original jack, which is often required to use the "official"jacking points. I use a bottle jack

(Seems to be stuck in italics. Whaddya gonna do?)

 

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